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Traditional, Colourful, Indian Art Rangoli (Draw Yourself)

Updated on October 23, 2017
ChitrangadaSharan profile image

Chitrangada loves the richness of Indian art,culture and traditions. As a writer she wants to spread information to the readers, about India

Rangoli made with coloured sand
Rangoli made with coloured sand | Source

What is a Rangoli ?

Rangolis are colorful, decorative designs, drawn on the floor. It is part of the Indian culture and tradition. Rangolis are made on festivals, especially Diwali. It is also made during weddings. Rangolis can be made with colored sand, flowers, rice flour, turmeric and other things varying according to different parts of India.

Flower Rangoli with earthen lamp at the centre
Flower Rangoli with earthen lamp at the centre | Source

Colorful Rangolis : A cultural tradition of India!

© Chitrangada Sharan, July 2013

All Rights Reserved

  • India is a country, which loves colors--Vibrant and full of life.
  • India is a multilingual and multicultural country, but one thing is common---its Spirit and enthusiasm.
  • The enthusiasm to celebrate every small pleasure, with folk songs, dances and festivals. There might be variation, depending upon the terrain and the availability of resources.

Rangoli is a traditional art of India and is made on the floor of homes or courtyards.

  • Basically these are bright colored patterns and designs, which can be made with colored wheat flour, colored rice, rice powder, turmeric powder, vermillon, fresh flowers or flower petals. But nowadays even chemical colors are used to make Rangoli designs.
  • It is a skill, which is passed on from one generation to the other.
  • You can see small Rangolis and very big ones too. The big ones are generally made with lot of people participating in the drawing of Rangolis.

The purpose of making Rangolis:

  • The main purpose of making Rangolis is to bring Good Luck and Prosperity, to the members of the family.
  • This is the reason, why in many homes, the Rangolis are made early morning, before leaving home for job or any other work, which you want to be successfully completed.
  • The Rangoli of course has cultural and religious significance attached to it as well. Before starting daily prayers, Rangolis are made to welcome the Gods and get their blessings.
  • It is generally made by the lady of the house or young girls and this is considered auspicious.
  • In many homes, especially in Southern India, Rangolis are made everyday and not just on special occasions.
  • Marriage ceremonies, special occasions and festivals like Deepavali cannot be complete without colorful Rangoli.

The Festival of Lights, Diwali is incomplete without Rangoli art.
The Festival of Lights, Diwali is incomplete without Rangoli art. | Source

How to make Rangoli with Rice powder, Coloured powder, Turmeric, Flowers !

1. Rangolis Made With Turmeric Powder Or Vermilion:

For festivals, weddings and religious purposes, turmeric or 'haldi' powder and vermilion or sindoor is used to make Rangolis.

Simple designs or religious symbols, such as the 'Swastika', the 'Fish', the 'Sun', the 'Moon', the 'Stars', the 'Lotus', the 'Om'symbol etc. are made, either on the floors or on the walls.

When a wedding is to take place, or a child is born, and even to welcome the new bride or bridegroom, these auspicious Rangolis are drawn.

2. Rice Powder Rangolis:

These Rangolis need a little bit of preparation.

Soak half cup of rice in water. After the rice has absorbed the water, drain the water and let it dry for some time. You can even dry it on a tissue paper, if you do not want to wait.

Grind the rice with the help of a food processor and your Rangoli powder is ready.

You can mix some water, if you want to make a wet rice powder Rangoli or dry as per your choice.

Make beautiful designs with the help of the rice powder.

3. Flower Rangolis:


This kind of Rangoli , as the name suggests is made with flowers.

You may choose different contrasting colours to make a beautiful Rangoli---Bright yellows, reds, white purple, in flowers such as Marigold, Rose, Jasmine, look great.

After making the Rangolis on the surface of a cup of water in a flat plate, you must keep sprinkling water as required to keep the flowers fresh and the Rangoli beautiful. Just as you would do with a flower bouquet in a flower vase.

4. Coloured Powder Rangoli:

This is the most common one and does not require much preparation. You can get the sand colours at the market and there are lot of colours to choose from.

Just draw a design of your choice and fill in the colours.

Basically Rangoli designs are geometrical patterns. But you do not need your geometrical tools to draw it.

Flower Rangoli
Flower Rangoli | Source

How to draw Rangolis on the floor!

  • Making Rangoli designs is very easy. Initially you may find it difficult to draw a design. But those who know a little bit of drawing can do it.
  • The basic trick is that, you just have to draw several dots symmetrically and then join them in beautiful shapes of your choice.
  • Finally fill in the colours carefully, so that there is no overlapping and there is clear demarcation among different colours.
  • It is matter of practice to perfection.
  • To start with, one can make small designs, before trying the big ones.
  • There is no limit to the imagination. People make incredible designs and drawing and filling of colours is just fun, as the whole joy is of getting together with family and friends.
  • After all that is the purpose of festivals---to bring happiness and harmony!

The colourful Rangolis truly represent the culture and diversity of India, They joy of creating beautiful, colourful designs on the floor brightens up the lives of people.

© Chitrangada Sharan

5th July, 2013

PROTECTED: PLEASE DO NOT COPY!

Easy Rangoli designs, source: YouTube

Have you ever tried drawing RANGOLIS?

See results
Rangolis are also drawn to welcome guests
Rangolis are also drawn to welcome guests | Source

Flower Rangoli, source: You tube

Colored powder Rangoli, source: You tube

© 2013 Chitrangada Sharan

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    • ChitrangadaSharan profile image
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      Chitrangada Sharan 10 months ago from New Delhi, India

      Thanks Nithya for revisiting this hub about Rangolis!

      Truly appreciated!

    • Vellur profile image

      Nithya Venkat 10 months ago from Dubai

      Came back to read and admire the beauty of rangolis, thank you for sharing.

    • ChitrangadaSharan profile image
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      Chitrangada Sharan 13 months ago from New Delhi, India

      Thank you Shampa for all those appreciative and kind words!

      I am glad you liked this hub about Rangoli. I am very much aware about the Bengali culture and the most beautiful 'Alpana' designs they make. I have many Bengali friends and some Bengali relatives too.

      Rangoli art has almost become universal in India and it is made everywhere. I have had the privilege of living in many parts of India and thus learnt a lot from everywhere.

      Thanks again for your lovely comments!

    • shampa sadhya profile image

      Shampa Sadhya 13 months ago from NEW DELHI, INDIA

      Thank you for sharing this article on Fb as I have missed reading it earlier. There is nothing special to write about your writing as it is wonderful as always. Although I do not draw, paint or make rangoli anymore, still a big admirer of this form of fine arts. Bengalis give 'alpona' with white rice powder paste but nowadays many also opt for colored one, dry or wet, even one made with flowers is getting popular too. To be very specific, during religious festivals preferably at the place of kalash sthapana alpona is made. Once again a very good write-up.

    • ChitrangadaSharan profile image
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      Chitrangada Sharan 13 months ago from New Delhi, India

      Thank you MarleneB for your kind visit and appreciation of the hub!

      Your question is valid and not insensitive at all.

      Rangoli is symbolic of the fact that 'all good or beautiful things come to an end.'

      Just as the flowers give the message about life-- Live it, Love it, Appreciate it but do not get too much attached or addicted to it.

      Man is Mortal and whosoever accepts and understands this reality of life, will always remain calm and peaceful in any situation, favourable or not so favourable.

      In South India Rangoli is created each morning and not only on Diwali or festivals. When the new one has to be made the previous one is erased or wiped out.

      During Diwali however People prefer to keep it for at least one week. If it is spoilt it can be redrawn as the ritual is to make it temporary.

      Thank you and I hope I satisfied your curiosity.

      Have a lovely day!

    • ChitrangadaSharan profile image
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      Chitrangada Sharan 13 months ago from New Delhi, India

      Thank you Suzette for your kind comments!

      Yes indeed they look beautiful and it is fun and so enjoyable when the entire family gathers to create these auspicious Rangoli designs.

      Turmeric is considered very auspicious and it is a must for festivals or wedding rituals. Same is true for rice or rice powder too.

      Thank you for your visit and positive comments!

    • MarleneB profile image

      Marlene Bertrand 13 months ago from Northern California, USA

      I saw a video of a lady making one of these and it was beautiful. At the time, I did not know the significance of it. Now that I know, it is even more beautiful. And, I hope I don't sound insensitive, but, what happens to the artwork when the flowers die or when the design is disturbed, by say... mother nature. Or, for the people who create Rangolis each morning? I think after a few days, one would run out of space to create a fresh new one without destroying the previous one. Is there a ritual for replacing the art? Oh, how I hope this is not a thoughtless question.

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      suzettenaples 13 months ago

      This is really a beautiful art to have in your home. The designs are lovely. I was surprised to see that termeric and rice powder are used to create these. What a creative art to add to your home. Love the different designs!

    • ChitrangadaSharan profile image
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      Chitrangada Sharan 16 months ago from New Delhi, India

      Namaste Deborah Demander!

      Thank you for your kind visit and appreciation of the hub. I am pleased to learn that you liked this traditional art of India.

      Have a good day!

    • Deborah Demander profile image

      Deborah Demander 16 months ago from First Wyoming, then THE WORLD

      Thank you for sharing these beautiful and significant works of art. They are gifts from the heart.

      Namaste

    • ChitrangadaSharan profile image
      Author

      Chitrangada Sharan 22 months ago from New Delhi, India

      Thank you Vikas Arora ji, for your kind visit and appreciation of the hub!

      Glad you liked it!

    • punitbook profile image

      Vikas Arora 22 months ago from India

      Really beautiful collection and rangoli collection. We must apply in all the occasion.

    • ChitrangadaSharan profile image
      Author

      Chitrangada Sharan 2 years ago from New Delhi, India

      Thank you Shankar ji, for your visit and appreciation!

      Glad you liked it!

    • profile image

      Shankar 2 years ago

      They all are very beautiful..

    • ChitrangadaSharan profile image
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      Chitrangada Sharan 3 years ago from New Delhi, India

      Thank you janshares, for your kind visit and wonderful comments!

      I am glad that you liked this folk art of India. Much appreciated!

    • ChitrangadaSharan profile image
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      Chitrangada Sharan 3 years ago from New Delhi, India

      Thank you AudreyHowitt, for your visit and appreciation!

    • ChitrangadaSharan profile image
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      Chitrangada Sharan 3 years ago from New Delhi, India

      Thank you Suzette Walker, for reading and commenting!

      I am glad that you liked this hub and you are right that Indians in general are attracted towards vibrant colors.

      Regarding 'Swastika', it is considered an auspicious symbol, since many centuries ago, in fact since ages.

      In fact it is a Sanskrit word, which means, Sun, life, good luck, power, strength and considered auspicious.

      I am aware that Hitler used this symbol, for whatever reasons and thus there is a lot of confusion over this symbol in most Western countries. But I have also read that Hitler used the symbol of Swastika in its reverse shape. God knows what it meant for him.

      But in most Asian countries, it is still considered an auspicious symbol.

      Thanks again!

    • ChitrangadaSharan profile image
      Author

      Chitrangada Sharan 3 years ago from New Delhi, India

      Thank you Audrey Hunt, for your beautiful comments!

      I am glad to know that you liked this Indian tradition. Getting involved in Rangoli making is a rejuvenating experience. And having so many happy people around, has a very positive impact on the senses.

      Have a good day and thanks for sharing!

    • ChitrangadaSharan profile image
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      Chitrangada Sharan 3 years ago from New Delhi, India

      Thanks Paula, for your visit and comments!

      You are right that they resemble Mandalas. But Mandalas are drawn with geometric precision according to set spiritual rules. In Rangolis, you have the liberty of drawing any beautiful shape/ size/ color you wish.

      Thanks again!

    • janshares profile image

      Janis Leslie Evans 3 years ago from Washington, DC

      Thank you for sharing such a rich part of the Indian culture, Chitrangada. These Rangoli are gorgeous. I had never seen nor heard of such. This is a well-done and informative hub. Voted up, beautiful, and interesting.

    • AudreyHowitt profile image

      Audrey Howitt 3 years ago from California

      These are beautiful--and so diverse!

    • suzettenaples profile image

      Suzette Walker 3 years ago from Taos, NM

      I have never heard of these until reading your article. These are beautiful and I have noticed that Indians do like bright and intense colors in clothing and homes etc. These designs are beautiful and your instructions are easy to follow as is the video. One thing that concerned me - swastikas as a design? I associate those with Adolf Hitler, WWII and the Holocaust. Does that word have a different meaning in the Indian culture. I would not want to see a swastika. Besides that, this is a beautiful hub.

    • vocalcoach profile image

      Audrey Hunt 3 years ago from Nashville Tn.

      Oh, what beautiful colors! I love this tradition you have in India. The patterns and designs make me feel beautiful and bring me peace. Thank you and will share. - Peace to you - Audrey

    • Paula Atwell profile image

      Paula Atwell 3 years ago from Cleveland, OH

      This sounds a little bit like Mandalas. :)

    • ChitrangadaSharan profile image
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      Chitrangada Sharan 3 years ago from New Delhi, India

      Thank you Nithya!

      Your visit and comments are much appreciated. Happy Deepawali!

    • Vellur profile image

      Nithya Venkat 3 years ago from Dubai

      I love rangolis, they are so beautiful. The rangoli photos are great.

    • ChitrangadaSharan profile image
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      Chitrangada Sharan 3 years ago from New Delhi, India

      Hi Nidhi!

      Thanks for your kind visit and comments! You can make Rangoli designs on canvas too and oil paint them. The above mentioned designs are for temporary decoration and have to be made on the floor. If you want to make on your wall, you will have to use permanent colors.

      Thank you!

    • profile image

      Nidhi 3 years ago

      Hi Chitrangada, Can you make rangoli designs on a canvas also?

    • ChitrangadaSharan profile image
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      Chitrangada Sharan 3 years ago from New Delhi, India

      Thank you MJennifer, for your wonderful comments!

      Very valuable interpretation that just as 'Man is mortal' and 'all good things come to an end'--these colorful designs are symbolic of that.

      We must live happily with the present and enjoy the beauty of today!

      Thank you so much for your insightful comments!

    • ChitrangadaSharan profile image
      Author

      Chitrangada Sharan 3 years ago from New Delhi, India

      Thank you Peggy W, for such beautiful words of appreciation of this article!

      I am so glad to learn that you liked this art form. Yes, the flower Rangolis are heavenly fragrant. All this does require planning, preparation and practice, but when one looks at the final result, its worth all the effort.

      Many thanks for such a generous share on HP, Google+ and twitter!

    • ChitrangadaSharan profile image
      Author

      Chitrangada Sharan 3 years ago from New Delhi, India

      Thank you Daisy, for your kind words of appreciation!

      I am so pleased that you liked this hub. Rangolis are easy to make and no doubt give us the joy of creation. Me and my daughter had so much fun creating all these colorful designs.

      Thank you so much for sharing it so generously on HP, Google+ and twitter!

    • MJennifer profile image

      Marcy J. Miller 3 years ago from Arizona

      What a lovely tradition, Chitrangada! I love that the rangoli is beautiful but impermanent -- so symbolic of life passages. That really reflects such a cultural difference from my own, where we seem to attach such a need for permanence (and thus a sense of ownership) rather than enjoying the beauty of the day and then letting it go.

      I really enjoyed this.

      Best -- Mj

    • Peggy W profile image

      Peggy Woods 3 years ago from Houston, Texas

      How very interesting that this is done daily by many people! The designs are beautiful and must take lots of practice to make them look so perfect. I can just imagine how beautiful and fragrant one made with all flowers must be! I saw this from Daisy's share on G+. Will also share on G+, twitter and on HP.

    • Daisy Mariposa profile image

      Daisy Mariposa 3 years ago from Orange County (Southern California)

      Chitrangada,

      What a fascinating article! I love reading Hubs from which I learn something new. I'm tweeting this article, posting the link on Google+, and sharing it with my HubPages followers.

    • ChitrangadaSharan profile image
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      Chitrangada Sharan 3 years ago from New Delhi, India

      Thanks goodnews11, for your visit and comments!

      Glad you liked this hub. My neighbor is a Tamilian and it is beautiful to see her make wonderful rice powder designs, in front of her door, early in the morning.

      Thanks again for your positive comments!

    • goodnews11 profile image

      OSBERT JOEL C 3 years ago from CHENNAI

      You have done a great job.. This hub reflects the tradition of our Nation. Here in Tamil Nadu people use to make rangoli in front of their houses every morning using rice power...

      Well done!

    • ChitrangadaSharan profile image
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      Chitrangada Sharan 3 years ago from New Delhi, India

      Hi Shreya!

      Thanks for visiting this page! But I am afraid, I can not add your picture on this page. If I am not mistaken, you are not a member of HP.

      Thanks anyway for your enthusiasm and I am sure your Rangoli must be beautiful. Thanks!

    • profile image

      Shreya Garg 3 years ago

      hi, i wanted to add my rangoli...plss help me

    • ChitrangadaSharan profile image
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      Chitrangada Sharan 3 years ago from New Delhi, India

      Thanks poetryman6969, for your visit and comments!

    • poetryman6969 profile image

      poetryman6969 3 years ago

      some lovely designs and colors!

    • ChitrangadaSharan profile image
      Author

      Chitrangada Sharan 3 years ago from New Delhi, India

      Thanks Fiona Jean Mckay, for visiting this hub and your appreciative comments!

      I am sure you can make them with just a little bit of practice. If you face any problem, I would be so glad to help.

      Thanks and have a good day!

    • Fiona Jean Mckay profile image

      Fiona 3 years ago from South Africa

      These are really lovely - thank you for including the instructions for making the rice powder. I would love to try to make one of these but am not sure I would be able to.

    • ChitrangadaSharan profile image
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      Chitrangada Sharan 3 years ago from New Delhi, India

      Thanks CraftytotheCore, for visiting this hub and your appreciation!

      Yes these beautiful patterns can be made with flour and are easily mastered with practice.

      Thanks for your lovely comments!

    • CraftytotheCore profile image

      CraftytotheCore 3 years ago

      These are so beautiful. I find it amazing that these can be made from flour. They are so lovely.

    • ChitrangadaSharan profile image
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      Chitrangada Sharan 4 years ago from New Delhi, India

      Thanks loveofnight, for reading this hub and your positive comments!

      I am sure you will make wonderful Rangolis and spread happiness.

      Thanks for your lovely comments!

    • ChitrangadaSharan profile image
      Author

      Chitrangada Sharan 4 years ago from New Delhi, India

      Hi Dolores Monet!

      Many thanks for visiting this hub and your kind words of appreciation!

      Yes, it is wonderful to create these wonderful colourful designs and my daughter enjoys doing it. This no doubt spreads positivity and happiness.

      Thanks for your lovely comments and support!

    • loveofnight profile image

      loveofnight 4 years ago from Baltimore, Maryland

      i love this, i had never heard of this art form before but i definitely am intending to try it. thank you for such a useful hub.

    • Dolores Monet profile image

      Dolores Monet 4 years ago from East Coast, United States

      So beautiful! It must be wonderful to make this colorful art along with your daughter. And the both of you making Rangoli to share with guests and neighbors - you are creating such happiness!

    • ChitrangadaSharan profile image
      Author

      Chitrangada Sharan 4 years ago from New Delhi, India

      Hi lindajot!

      Thanks for reading this hub and your kind comments! I am pleased with your appreciation of the Indian culture. These designs are temporary by choice but you can make them permanent if you like. If drawn with oil paint or enamel paint, it stays like one draws it. But the general tradition is to make it temporary with ingredients mentioned above. We take care, so that it does not get spoilt soon, by avoiding to step on it.

      Thanks again!

    • lindajot profile image

      lindajot 4 years ago from Willamette Valley - Oregon

      Really enjoyed this hub! I love to read about other cultures, and India sounds amazing. I'm wondering if these designs are temporary, and how long do they last?

    • ChitrangadaSharan profile image
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      Chitrangada Sharan 4 years ago from New Delhi, India

      Hi Devika!

      Thanks for your kind visit and positive comments. Its always a pleasure to have your feedback.

      Thanks again!

    • DDE profile image

      Devika Primić 4 years ago from Dubrovnik, Croatia

      Colorful RANGOLI : A Traditional Indian Art-How To Make Colorful Designs very beautiful and you always good to read another awesome hub fromyou

    • ChitrangadaSharan profile image
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      Chitrangada Sharan 4 years ago from New Delhi, India

      Thanks midget38, for visiting this hub and your appreciation!

      Yes, you are right Rangoli making is fun and if lot of people participate, the fun only multiplies.

      Thanks!

    • profile image

      midget38 4 years ago

      Got my students to make Rangoli once and we had a lot of fun. A great hub, Sharan!

    • ChitrangadaSharan profile image
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      Chitrangada Sharan 4 years ago from New Delhi, India

      Thanks sky2day, for your interest and such nice words of appreciation!

      This is such a nice gesture on your part that you are planning to make Rangolis on the auspicious occasion of your grandson' s birthday. My best wishes to you and your grandson in advance.

      Thank you once again!

    • skye2day profile image

      skye2day 4 years ago from Rocky Mountains

      Precious woman. Oh I see. Thanks so much. I am going to make a rangoli for my grandsons birthday party in September. It looks like great fun to make one and then to share with others. Better yet everyone at the party could help make it. Well I have time to think on it. Thank you so much for sharing. Love n Hugs, Skye

    • ChitrangadaSharan profile image
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      Chitrangada Sharan 4 years ago from New Delhi, India

      Hi sky2day!

      So nice to see you here! I appreciate your visit and valuable comments.

      Normally, no glue is put before making the Rangolis. People try not to step on it and it stays like it was made, until one wants to remove it or sweep it off. During Diwali-the festival of lights, it is kept for as long as the guests keep on visiting, which can happen for as long as a week. If it is spoilt due to some movement, it can be easily touched up or remade. People enjoy making Rangolis, especially during festivals.

      Another way is to surround it with flower pots etc. so that children do not step over it by chance.

      Thanks for your support, votes and interest!

      Have a good day!

    • skye2day profile image

      skye2day 4 years ago from Rocky Mountains

      Hello dear and precious Chitrangada. This is a beautiful hub. I love how you laid out the steps. Easy to follow. I think this would be so fun to do at a birthday party or as you mentioned any celebration. I am wondering if you wanted it to stay put would you put down glue so the sand stays? I did not see that in the hub. Do you all save yours or after the celebration sweep up sand? Love n Hugs to you in India. Skye

      voted up girl awesome

    • ChitrangadaSharan profile image
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      Chitrangada Sharan 4 years ago from New Delhi, India

      Thanks howcurecancer, for visiting and appreciating!

    • howcurecancer profile image

      Elena@LessIsHealthy 4 years ago

      Wow! Never seen this kind of art. Beautiful!

    • ChitrangadaSharan profile image
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      Chitrangada Sharan 4 years ago from New Delhi, India

      Thanks Writer Fox, for stopping by!

      Glad you liked and enjoyed it!

    • Writer Fox profile image

      Writer Fox 4 years ago from the wadi near the little river

      What beautiful folk art! I have never seen this before. Enjoyed.

    • ChitrangadaSharan profile image
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      Chitrangada Sharan 4 years ago from New Delhi, India

      Thanks Rose, for stopping by! Your comments about Indian culture touched my heart.

      I am glad that you liked the hub. Thanks for voting up!

    • rose-the planner profile image

      rose-the planner 4 years ago from Toronto, Ontario-Canada

      The Indian culture s so incredibly rich in so many aspects. The Rangoli art is spectacular in both beauty and symbolism. Thank you for sharing a bit of your world with us. (Voted Up) -Rose

    • ChitrangadaSharan profile image
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      Chitrangada Sharan 4 years ago from New Delhi, India

      Thanks Sunil, for stopping by and your support!

      I am glad you liked this little effort of mine to showcase some aspects of our great culture. I will follow your advice of writing more such hubs about our vast cultural heritage.

      Thanks!

    • sunilkunnoth2012 profile image

      Sunil Kumar Kunnoth 4 years ago from Calicut (Kozhikode, South India)

      Simply wonderful. Thank you for sharing the rich heritage of our great nation. Keep up the spirit. Write more to showcase the magnificent features of Incredible India. Best of luck.

    • ChitrangadaSharan profile image
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      Chitrangada Sharan 4 years ago from New Delhi, India

      Thanks KoffeeKlatch Gals, for stopping by and your words of appreciation! I am so glad you liked it.

    • ChitrangadaSharan profile image
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      Chitrangada Sharan 4 years ago from New Delhi, India

      Thanks Dim Flaxenwick, for reading the hub!

      I am so pleased to read your lovely comments, especially about India. So nice to know that you have visited India 4 times.

      We Indians indeed love colors, in clothes, in food, in festivals and almost everything. Glad you liked the pictures.I have many more pictures of Rangolis, made by my daughter during Diwali festival.

      Many thanks for voting up so generously and all that appreciation!

    • KoffeeKlatch Gals profile image

      Susan Haze 4 years ago from Sunny Florida

      Beautiful patterns and colors. I would love to try it.

    • Dim Flaxenwick profile image

      Dim Flaxenwick 4 years ago from Great Britain

      What a fantastic hub!!!!!!.

      The pictures too, are stunning.

      I have visited India 4 times and each time l don't want to leave,. The first thing that hit me was the colour everywhere. Colour in the streets , so different from grey, grim Britain.

      l knew nothing of Rangolis until now. it is fascinating. I had to vote up and press all the buttons except funny.

      beautiful work.

    • ChitrangadaSharan profile image
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      Chitrangada Sharan 4 years ago from New Delhi, India

      Thanks pinto2011, for reading and appreciating the hub!

      I am glad, you liked my little effort to familiarize people with our vast and great tradition.

      Thanks!

    • pinto2011 profile image

      Subhas 4 years ago from New Delhi, India

      Hi ChitrangadaSharan! Very well written hub on our tradition. You have really displayed the essence of our festivities and how through these activities we make our life colorful and enjoyable.

    • ChitrangadaSharan profile image
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      Chitrangada Sharan 4 years ago from New Delhi, India

      Thanks Nell, for your visit and comments! So nice to see you here and thanks for voting up and sharing!

    • Nell Rose profile image

      Nell Rose 4 years ago from England

      These are so beautiful, and the meanings behind them are fascinating to read, voted up and shared! nell

    • ChitrangadaSharan profile image
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      Chitrangada Sharan 4 years ago from New Delhi, India

      Thanks Seeker7, for reading and commenting! It's a pleasure to see you here. I am so glad you liked this hub. I appreciate your lovely comments!

    • Seeker7 profile image

      Helen Murphy Howell 4 years ago from Fife, Scotland

      Oh what a beautiful hub this is - I love these wonderful designs and colours! I think what also adds to their beauty and energy is the meanings and thoughts that go into the Rangolis while they're being made.

      A fascinating and beautiful hub!

    • ChitrangadaSharan profile image
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      Chitrangada Sharan 4 years ago from New Delhi, India

      Thanks suzzycue, for your visit and appreciation!

      I am glad you liked this art form of India. And yes, Rangolis are made for a purpose. They are made to welcome Gods and your guests. It truly brings positivity, happiness, prosperity and good luck. The joy is even more, if it is made with all the family sitting together to make it. I enjoy making them along with my daughter.

      Thanks and so nice to see you again!

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      Chitrangada Sharan 4 years ago from New Delhi, India

      Thanks Lavender Jade, for your visit and appreciation!

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      Chitrangada Sharan 4 years ago from New Delhi, India

      Thanks zanaworld, for your visit and valuable comments!

      You are right Rangolis set the festive mood. And there is no limit, how many beautiful rangolis can be made and are made in different parts of India---each one delightful to look at. I have lived at different locations in India and I am familiar with the magic. I enjoy making them along with my daughter.

      Many thanks for your appreciation!

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      Susan Britton 4 years ago from Ontario, Canada

      It is great you showed me an Indian art and culture to enhance life style. I love it. These are so beautiful and they have meanings. See you learn something new every day on Hubpages. Well done ChitrangadaSharan.

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      Lavender Jade 4 years ago from Derbyshire

      These are beautiful, really enjoyed reading this hub

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      SA Shameel 4 years ago from Bangalore

      Rangolis are one of the delight sights - specially in front of a house. During Onam, one of our neighbor would make beautiful and colorful rangolis in their house. It is wonderful and a delight to look at.

      Thanks for wonderful and very interesting hubpage on Rangoli.

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      Chitrangada Sharan 4 years ago from New Delhi, India

      Hi mylindaelliott!

      Thank you so much for visiting this hub and your words of appreciation.

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      mylindaelliott 4 years ago from Louisiana

      I hadn't heard of these. They are so lovely. Thank you for sharing.

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      Chitrangada Sharan 4 years ago from New Delhi, India

      Thanks jabelufiroz, for reading and commenting! Thanks for voting up!

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      Chitrangada Sharan 4 years ago from New Delhi, India

      Thanks anndango, for your visit and words of appreciation!

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      Firoz 4 years ago from India

      Great hub on colours. Voted up and beautiful.

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      anndango 4 years ago

      These are beautiful - the colours and designs! Thanks for sharing this beautiful art form.