ArtsAutosBooksBusinessEducationEntertainmentFamilyFashionFoodGamesGenderHealthHolidaysHomeHubPagesPersonal FinancePetsPoliticsReligionSportsTechnologyTravel

Jute Plant - Saluyot (Corchorus Olitorius)

Updated on September 11, 2017
Saluyot (Corchorus olitorius) Jute plant or Jew's Mallows with a young flower ready to blossom.
Saluyot (Corchorus olitorius) Jute plant or Jew's Mallows with a young flower ready to blossom. | Source

Saluyot, as we call it in the Philippines is known to others as Jew's mallow, or the jute plant. Jute is commonly grown in the Philippines as a vegetable. The plant grows for up to 6 ft. in height with alternate leaves. The saluyot, is well known specially to the Ilocano people as the jute or saluyot leaves is an ingredient to their favorite Ilocano dish, dinengdeng which is a dish composed of all other kinds of vegetables.

Growing up to 6 ft., jute is an annual, erect plant. They do well on containers too. In fact, the jute plant photo above was planted in a container. The plant likes the warm weather but would be damage by severe drought and cold weathers.

Jute leaves are smooth, and thin and it is the leaves that is consumed. I have never tried or haven't heard of the fruit being included in cooking. One similarity it shares with okra is the saluyot leaves being slimy once cooked.

Sauteed jute leaves and long beans in soy sauce.
Sauteed jute leaves and long beans in soy sauce. | Source

Cooking with jute (saluyot) leaves:

As said, the jute leaves are often one of the vegetables in Ilocano dish dinengdeng. The dish is a healthy eat, a mixture of other vegetables as such eggplant, taro roots, okra, bitter melon, and other vegetables such as kalunay too can be added, according to one's choice or to replace another missing vegetable on the dish.

Other than that, the jute leaves can be:

* Sauteed.

= Sauté saluyot leaves with your choice of other vegetables. At home, we sauté jute leaves with long beans, a quick and easy viand for the day or when in a hurry.

= Or it can be sauteed with bamboo shoots.

In other countries, the jute leaves is also consumed.

* In Thailand, the saluyot or jute leaves is eaten with plain rice congee after being blanched.

* It is also usually used in stew in Nigerian cuisine.

* When dried, the leaves can be made into a herbal tea.


Click thumbnail to view full-size
An open ute flower.Unopened jute flower.
An open ute flower.
An open ute flower. | Source
Unopened jute flower.
Unopened jute flower. | Source

The yellow flowers of jute plant is small, about 2 -3 cm. and have both female and male organs. This flower would soon turn into a cylindrical capsule.


Did you know?

Saluyot, also known as Egyptian Spinach (melokhiya) and Jew's Mallow, got its name because it was a staple food of both since ancient times. Being considered as Egypt's staple food, jute was reportedly eaten by Cleopatra for its anti-aging benefits.

Click thumbnail to view full-size
Saluyot fruits. Showing here are the green, cylindrical fruits. Inside are many tiny, round seeds which turns black in color once matured while the fruit itself turns brown.
Saluyot fruits. Showing here are the green, cylindrical fruits. Inside are many tiny, round seeds which turns black in color once matured while the fruit itself turns brown.
Saluyot fruits. Showing here are the green, cylindrical fruits. Inside are many tiny, round seeds which turns black in color once matured while the fruit itself turns brown. | Source
Source

Have you known this plant before or maybe have tried cooking it?

See results

Health Benefits of Jute or Saluyot:

* This leafy vegetable is a good source of thiamine, riboflavin, ascorbic acid and rich in fiber.

* Jute leaves also provides beta-carotene which is good for the eyesight.

* It is also high in antioxidants.

* A good source of iron, calcium, phosphorus, and potassium.



Saluyot leaves on sale on one of San Diego's Seafood City branch.
Saluyot leaves on sale on one of San Diego's Seafood City branch.

Did you know?

Because jute gets slimy when cooked, it is used to thicken soups while the seeds are used for flavoring.

Comments

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment

    • profile image

      Marlyn 

      3 years ago

      Can the branches of the Saluyot tree be used as a substitute for seeds??

    • precy anza profile imageAUTHOR

      precy anza 

      4 years ago from USA

      @ Rajan:

      It does, looks like a mini okra. I don't think the fruits are edible though. It's only the tops that I knew is edible. Thanks for stopping, reading and sharing. :)

    • rajan jolly profile image

      Rajan Singh Jolly 

      4 years ago from From Mumbai, presently in Jalandhar,INDIA.

      The fruit just looks like okra. Can't you cook it. Even okra seeds turn almost black when mature and dry.

      Heard of this plant just for the first time today. Very interesting.

      Voted up, interesting and shared.

    • precy anza profile imageAUTHOR

      precy anza 

      5 years ago from USA

      @ Drbj: It is an interesting plant, specially with how those fruits lines up on the branch :)

      @ Avian: Right. They probably have it on Oriental markets, specially on Summer seasons. They might not have it everyday but sure there's days they have it. :)

    • aviannovice profile image

      Deb Hirt 

      5 years ago from Stillwater, OK

      Sounds like another winner to me, Precy Anza. I'll bet that there might be some at the Oriental market!

    • drbj profile image

      drbj and sherry 

      5 years ago from south Florida

      How interesting, precy. Imagine! Jute can grow up to 6 feet even when grown in a container. That's a powerful plant.

    • precy anza profile imageAUTHOR

      precy anza 

      5 years ago from USA

      @ Anglnwu:

      Just like okra, it's mucilaginous. It gets slimy when cook. :)

      @ Katherine:

      Yes. Now you can try it on cooking, good as a sauteed vegetable. :) I love the tiny, yellow flowers too.

    • cat on a soapbox profile image

      Catherine Tally 

      5 years ago from Los Angeles

      Very interesting- thank you! We are familiar w/ jute as a fibrous material for weaving and making nets but didn't know it had so many uses in cooking and is so nutritious.

    • anglnwu profile image

      anglnwu 

      5 years ago

      Interesting. I've not heard of this plant before. You said it's related to the okra family or is the fruit like okra? Would like to try it some day. Thanks for sharing and rate dup.

    working

    This website uses cookies

    As a user in the EEA, your approval is needed on a few things. To provide a better website experience, hubpages.com uses cookies (and other similar technologies) and may collect, process, and share personal data. Please choose which areas of our service you consent to our doing so.

    For more information on managing or withdrawing consents and how we handle data, visit our Privacy Policy at: https://hubpages.com/privacy-policy#gdpr

    Show Details
    Necessary
    HubPages Device IDThis is used to identify particular browsers or devices when the access the service, and is used for security reasons.
    LoginThis is necessary to sign in to the HubPages Service.
    Google RecaptchaThis is used to prevent bots and spam. (Privacy Policy)
    AkismetThis is used to detect comment spam. (Privacy Policy)
    HubPages Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide data on traffic to our website, all personally identifyable data is anonymized. (Privacy Policy)
    HubPages Traffic PixelThis is used to collect data on traffic to articles and other pages on our site. Unless you are signed in to a HubPages account, all personally identifiable information is anonymized.
    Amazon Web ServicesThis is a cloud services platform that we used to host our service. (Privacy Policy)
    CloudflareThis is a cloud CDN service that we use to efficiently deliver files required for our service to operate such as javascript, cascading style sheets, images, and videos. (Privacy Policy)
    Google Hosted LibrariesJavascript software libraries such as jQuery are loaded at endpoints on the googleapis.com or gstatic.com domains, for performance and efficiency reasons. (Privacy Policy)
    Features
    Google Custom SearchThis is feature allows you to search the site. (Privacy Policy)
    Google MapsSome articles have Google Maps embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    Google ChartsThis is used to display charts and graphs on articles and the author center. (Privacy Policy)
    Google AdSense Host APIThis service allows you to sign up for or associate a Google AdSense account with HubPages, so that you can earn money from ads on your articles. No data is shared unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    Google YouTubeSome articles have YouTube videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    VimeoSome articles have Vimeo videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    PaypalThis is used for a registered author who enrolls in the HubPages Earnings program and requests to be paid via PayPal. No data is shared with Paypal unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    Facebook LoginYou can use this to streamline signing up for, or signing in to your Hubpages account. No data is shared with Facebook unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    MavenThis supports the Maven widget and search functionality. (Privacy Policy)
    Marketing
    Google AdSenseThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Google DoubleClickGoogle provides ad serving technology and runs an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Index ExchangeThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    SovrnThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Facebook AdsThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Amazon Unified Ad MarketplaceThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    AppNexusThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    OpenxThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Rubicon ProjectThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    TripleLiftThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Say MediaWe partner with Say Media to deliver ad campaigns on our sites. (Privacy Policy)
    Remarketing PixelsWe may use remarketing pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to advertise the HubPages Service to people that have visited our sites.
    Conversion Tracking PixelsWe may use conversion tracking pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to identify when an advertisement has successfully resulted in the desired action, such as signing up for the HubPages Service or publishing an article on the HubPages Service.
    Statistics
    Author Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide traffic data and reports to the authors of articles on the HubPages Service. (Privacy Policy)
    ComscoreComScore is a media measurement and analytics company providing marketing data and analytics to enterprises, media and advertising agencies, and publishers. Non-consent will result in ComScore only processing obfuscated personal data. (Privacy Policy)
    Amazon Tracking PixelSome articles display amazon products as part of the Amazon Affiliate program, this pixel provides traffic statistics for those products (Privacy Policy)