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How to Verify if Your Gas Line is Grounded

Updated on September 13, 2012

Do You Know if You Have A Gas Line?

I know I have a gas line because I have the yellow, flexible gas line coming out of our gas water heater
I know I have a gas line because I have the yellow, flexible gas line coming out of our gas water heater | Source

Do You Have a Gas Line?

Do you have:

  • A gas furnace?
  • A gas water heater?
  • A gas stove?
  • A gas dryer?
  • A gas fireplace?

Answering yes to any of these questions means you have a gas line in the house and you should verify that it is grounded.

Is Your Gas Line Grounded?

Our house is in contract and the prospective buyers requested an inspection of our current home. Inspections are necessary for the buyer to understand the condition of the home as well as what items they would like to have repaired prior to closing. Our buyers generated a request to remedy as a result of the inspection. They have the opportunity to review the detailed inspection report and determine what items they can live with and what items they want the sellers to repair. I was shocked to find that one item in our remedy list was to have our gas line grounded.

Imagine that lightning strikes your house or even the ground outside your home. The energy can travel to your gas line and it can result in an explosion. When I asked our certified technician, Lonnie Judoson, “When you say explosion…” he said, “I mean explosion. Your house and everything in it gone!”

Is your gas line grounded?

Before and After Picture of Gas Line Being Grounded

Click thumbnail to view full-size
My gas line was not grounded: Yellow gas line and no copper wire grounding either side of the aluminum regulatorMy gas line is now grounded: copper wire attached to the black iron pipe on either side of the aluminum regulator
My gas line was not grounded: Yellow gas line and no copper wire grounding either side of the aluminum regulator
My gas line was not grounded: Yellow gas line and no copper wire grounding either side of the aluminum regulator | Source
My gas line is now grounded: copper wire attached to the black iron pipe on either side of the aluminum regulator
My gas line is now grounded: copper wire attached to the black iron pipe on either side of the aluminum regulator | Source

An Example of the Gas Line Grounded Outside the House

The gas line can also be grounded outside the home by attaching the #6 copper wire to the black iron pipe outside and burying the grounding rod or pipe eight feet into the ground.
The gas line can also be grounded outside the home by attaching the #6 copper wire to the black iron pipe outside and burying the grounding rod or pipe eight feet into the ground.

How Do You Determine if Your Gas Line Is Grounded?

I wasn’t even sure how to tell if our gas line is grounded.

We have a gas water heater. There is a yellow, flexible corrugated gas line coming from our water heater. Once I knew what I was looking for, I saw many yellow gas lines in the ceiling of our basement. Find two black iron pipes on either side of the aluminum regulator. If you do not have a #6 gauge copper wire connected to the pipes and going into your electrical box or outside your home, your gas line is not grounded.

If we had a finished basement and the gas line was not exposed, our technician told me that another option would be to ground the black iron pipe from outside the house and burying it eight feet into the ground.

Proper Gas Line Installation and Grounding

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An example of the CSST gas line being properly secured to an overhead beam on our basement ceilingOur #6 copper wire is grounded securely into the electrical boxOur technician curled the back of the copper wire where it attached to the black iron pipe for additional safety and to prevent the wire from slipping
An example of the CSST gas line being properly secured to an overhead beam on our basement ceiling
An example of the CSST gas line being properly secured to an overhead beam on our basement ceiling | Source
Our #6 copper wire is grounded securely into the electrical box
Our #6 copper wire is grounded securely into the electrical box | Source
Our technician curled the back of the copper wire where it attached to the black iron pipe for additional safety and to prevent the wire from slipping
Our technician curled the back of the copper wire where it attached to the black iron pipe for additional safety and to prevent the wire from slipping | Source

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Proper Gas Line Installation

Before beginning any job, our technician assesses that the gas line is properly installed. He verified proper supports for the gas line in addition to the correct size couplers. He makes sure nothing is hanging from the yellow gas line. He has seen instances where people have hung things, such as clothes hangers, from the gas line. That can put excess stress on the line causing it to crack and resulting in catastrophe.

Double check your gas line. Is it properly installed and free of hanging objects?

Did you check? Is your gas line grounded?

See results

Lonnie Judson Handyman Services

My Local Recommendation for Proper Gas Line Grounding:

Call for an estimate: (614) 620-4455

Gas Line Now Properly Grounded

I am shocked that we waited ten years to have our gas line grounded. When you consider the odds of having lightning strike your house, you might not consider it a big deal, but I don’t play the odds.We have been in our house for a decade and two homes in our neighborhood have caught on fire due to lightning strikes.

After learning about grounding the gas line, we would be fortunate to have a fire instead of an explosion.

I rest easy knowing that our gas line is now grounded.

Can you?

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    • twinstimes2 profile image
      Author

      Karen Lackey 5 years ago from Ohio

      Thanks, Kashmir! As always, I appreciate your comments as well as your avatar!

    • twinstimes2 profile image
      Author

      Karen Lackey 5 years ago from Ohio

      I am glad he checked. Our house is a new build and perhaps they do things differently depending on part of the country as well as with or without basements. Thanks for commenting and sharing!

    • kashmir56 profile image

      Thomas Silvia 5 years ago from Massachusetts

      Hi twinstimes2 great hub with very valuable information that every home owner need to know.

      Well done and vote up and more !!!

    • eHealer profile image

      Deborah 5 years ago from Las Vegas

      Twinstimes2, I made my husband read this hub and he said the gas line was underground, I think I have to take his word for it, but you know, he did check, and that's a good thing! Thanks for the informational and very important hub. Voted Up and Shared!

    • twinstimes2 profile image
      Author

      Karen Lackey 5 years ago from Ohio

      Natasha, I didn't know this either, but I am glad I learned. I was hoping that I could inform a couple people on what I learned last week, too! Thanks for reading!

    • Natashalh profile image

      Natasha 5 years ago from Hawaii

      Gosh! I didn't know gas lines could be grounded! I glad I live in an apartment right now and don't have to worry about this stuff.

    • twinstimes2 profile image
      Author

      Karen Lackey 5 years ago from Ohio

      Thanks for reading, Laura. My goal was information and just enough fear that you would check. :) I figure my family was too valuable not to check.

    • LauraGSpeaks profile image

      LauraGSpeaks 5 years ago from Raleigh, NC

      Very informative hub. Since you have put fear in my mind, I am going now to see if my gas line grounded....