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Arts & Crafts: The Movement & The Design Styles for Architecture & Interior Decorating

Updated on March 6, 2016
chezchazz profile image

Chazz is an Interior Decorator/Consultant/Retailer, amateur photographer, cook, gardener, handyman, currently restoring an 1880 Victorian.

Photo is a detail from American Bungalow Style by Robert Winter. Available Below.
Photo is a detail from American Bungalow Style by Robert Winter. Available Below.

The Arts & Crafts Movement: More than an Architectural and Interior Design Style


This page provides a review of the Arts and Crafts movement and its main variations written by a specialist in historic interior design (me). The information on this page will help you create the right look for c.1900 period home decor.

You will find decorator tips, information about colors, fabrics, furnishings and accessories as well as photos and resources to help you decorate in any of the variations of Arts and Crafts period decorating styles.

Detail of an Arts & Crafts floral motif.
Detail of an Arts & Crafts floral motif.

The Arts & Crafts Movement

Philosophy and Origins


The Arts and Crafts Movement was a philosophy as well as a design movement in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries (c. 1890-1915). Developed in reaction to the transformations in craftsmanship caused by the industrial revolution, it emphasized individual design and craftsmanship while also being a social and environmental cause.

Many of the leading proponents of the movement were active in socialist causes as well as artistic endeavors. In the United States, the Arts & Crafts/Craftsman movement was the aesthetic counterpart of Progressivism, also a social reform movement.

For now, it is important to know that the Arts & Crafts movement was just that. It was more than a style but embraced a well-articulated popular philosophy and aesthetic.

Note the portieres in the doorway and the linearity of the furnishings. (The watermark does not appear on actual posters but is to deter unauthorized use of allposters images. It is used here with permission.)
Note the portieres in the doorway and the linearity of the furnishings. (The watermark does not appear on actual posters but is to deter unauthorized use of allposters images. It is used here with permission.) | Source

Arts & Crafts Style

The Arts and Crafts movement overlapped with and grew out of the late Victorian (Eastlake/ Aesthetic, Gothic Revival) period. In response to the excesses of the Victorian era and the increasing reliance on manufactured mass-produced furnishings and other items, the Arts & Crafts movement focused on a return to simplicity and craftsmanship.

This style of home decor is based on heavy, rectilinear forms visually lightened by details and/or construction techniques. The use of parallel slats with equal spaces between them and stained glass inserts in doors and walls are two examples of this.

The Joinery and support (e.g. corbels) are visible and incorporated into the design of the building or funiture. The contrast of air and light, the stability of wood and open space created an overall effect that was warm and both solid and graceful. Ornamentation is minimal and used to subtly enhance the lines, function and construction of the piece.

The Morris chair shown here (above right) exemplifies the Arts & Crafts style's design dictum.

American Bungalow Style
American Bungalow Style

300+ gorgeous color photos of 24 exemplary Bungalows with detailed, easy-to-read text. If you haven't yet fallen in love with this style you will after reading this book.

 

For Your Arts & Crafts Library - American Bungalow Style

The American Bungalow Arts & Crafts style home had many regional variations, but common features generally included low-pitch roof lines on a gabled or hipped roof, deep overhanging eave that extended to cover a front porch with exposed rafters or corbel brackets under the eaves. They were built using local materials and were very popular from 1910 to 1925. Bungalow style houses were built in some areas of the country until 1940.

The Arts & Crafts Movement in America

A Gustav Stickley Craftsman Interior
A Gustav Stickley Craftsman Interior
The Craftsman Magazine 1904 published by Gustav Stickley
The Craftsman Magazine 1904 published by Gustav Stickley | Source

American Craftsman Style

Craftsman style is rooted in the Arts & Crafts movement and frequently the two are neither distinguished nor distinguishable from each other. It takes its name from a popular publication that featured the Arts and Crafts influenced designs introduced by Gustav Stickley.

There were regional variations in Craftsman styles of architecture and interior design across the United States. Bungalows, for example, which were more modest versions of Arts & Crafts houses, were extremely popular. Bungalows were generally built in planned neighborhoods of the early 1900s and the style was embraced by the burgeoning middle class.

The Prairie style of the midwest and the Mission style that was inspired by the early American Colonial missions of the southwest are two other regional variations of the style. We will discuss these variations in more detail later on.

For more about Gustav Stickley, William Morris and other names associated with the Arts and Crafts Movement, see Part 2 of Arts and Crafts Period Interior Design and Home Decorating: Names to Know.

What to Look For in Arts & Crafts Style Interior Decor

© 2011-15 Restoration Fabrics & Trims LLC
© 2011-15 Restoration Fabrics & Trims LLC

You can still find a wide range of period antiques including pottery, metal work, furniture, and more from the Arts & Crafts/Craftsman/Mission period. Names to look for include Roseville, Rookwood, Roycroft, Weller, William Morris, Gustav Stickley, Walter Crane, John Ruskin, Charles Rennie Mackintosh, and others. There are also many fine reproductions available as the style is currently popular again (or still, depending on your perspective).

Look for abstracted art-nouveau influenced flat or shallow incised designs, hammered metals, gothic-influenced iron strap hinges, construction joinery as part of the design, an emphasis on linearity as opposed to curves and on functionality.

Popular motifs included stylized depictions of flora and fauna. Birds, Roses, Tulips, Sunflowers, Rabbits, Dragonflies, Pinecones, Peacocks, and Deer were some of the most frequently used. The Arts & Crafts style was a bridge between the former Art Nouveau style and the Art Deco period that followed it. Both of these traditions are also evident in the Craftsman era.

A rendering of an interior from a Craftsman style home. Note the high wood railings, slat-back chairs, mica chandelier, area rugs, and earthtone colors. This picture is available in a variety of sizes and formats at
A rendering of an interior from a Craftsman style home. Note the high wood railings, slat-back chairs, mica chandelier, area rugs, and earthtone colors. This picture is available in a variety of sizes and formats at | Source

Arts & Crafts Colors Are Taken from Nature

© Restoration Fabrics & Trims
© Restoration Fabrics & Trims

Arts and Crafts colors are a harmonious palette taken from nature. Earthtones including Ochre, Madder red, Hunter and Olive greens and blue, gray, and beige shades of Stone predominate. They are dusty, muted, and soft tones that generally avoid pastels and primary colors. Please note that because computer monitors do not accurately and consistently depict color so the photo should be considered an approximation.

From The Beautiful Necessity by Bruce Smith and Yoshiko Yamamoto. Available below.
From The Beautiful Necessity by Bruce Smith and Yoshiko Yamamoto. Available below.

Arts & Crafts / Craftsman / Mission Style Furnishings

For Period Home Decor

Great deals can still be found on authentic antique Arts and Crafts furniture and new furniture in the style is also popular. New pieces range from top quality pieces still being produced by the Stickley company and hand-crafted copies made from original patterns to assemble-it-yourself "Mission" furniture scaled smaller for apartment living and tighter budgets.

"Mission" furniture is very versatile. It mixes well with Gothic Revival and Eastlake styles as they share the same roots -- and often the same artists and designers. It also works nicely when combined with country primitives and Asian influenced styles as well as some modern pieces.

The Beautiful Necessity
The Beautiful Necessity

140 exquisite photographs demonstrate how the Craftsman style has brought warmth, comfort, and utilitarian ease to homes past and present.

 

Note: Despite the common usage, Mission Style is not the same as Craftsman/Stickley Style. See section below on Regional Variations for additional information.

Arts & Crafts Fabrics - For Period Interior Decorating

Workers printing chintz by hand at the William Morris Works at Merton Abbey
Workers printing chintz by hand at the William Morris Works at Merton Abbey | Source

The Arts and Crafts era saw a resurgence of the "Renaissance Man" in many ways. William Morris, for example, was a prolific author in multiple genres, a designer and artist equally comfortable designing typography, illustrations, books, rugs, embroidery, wallpaper, stained glass, tapestries, curtains, furniture and textiles, as well as a philosopher, social activist, and businessman.

Period fabrics feature patterns, colours and textures that combine intricacy and simplicity and range from subtle to dramatic. Interweaving both sinuous nouveau-influenced and angular abstracted shapes, these fabrics often beg to be touched, examined more closely, and admired tirelessly. Whether woven, block printed, screen printed, stenciled or embroidered, you're sure to find a fabric that is the perfect complement to your Arts and Crafts interior decor.

New & Vintage Arts & Crafts Style Fabrics

You can still find authentic William Morris, Charles Voysey, and other period designs in vintage & new reproduction fabrics for drapery, upholstery, bedding, and other interior decorating projects. The ones shown above are from Restoration Fabrics & Trims.

Rug shown above is "Poppy" by Axminster carpet, designed by William Morris in 1875 as it is used in the library of the Lyman Estate in Waltham, Massachusetts. Photographed by Kevin Latady. Used with permission.
Rug shown above is "Poppy" by Axminster carpet, designed by William Morris in 1875 as it is used in the library of the Lyman Estate in Waltham, Massachusetts. Photographed by Kevin Latady. Used with permission. | Source

Arts & Crafts Area Rugs

Area rugs were used to add warmth and create accented areas in the Arts & Crafts home. Rugs, like furmiture, were sometimes included in an architect's designs for upscale homes and were custom made-to-order.

In order to create an authentic historic style interior decor, hand-made area rugs are a necessity but wall-to-wall carpet should be avoided.

Area rugs do not have to be custom designed, but should be chosen with care to complement your space, furnishings, color scheme, and purpose.

Your choice of rugs is also a great way to personalize your home decor. Whether flat-woven, hand-knotted, tapestry or another type, Arts & Crafts rugs featured geometric and abstracted art nouveau style designs and sometimes a combination of both.

Everest Khalista Area Rug by Couristan. Available at
Everest Khalista Area Rug by Couristan. Available at | Source

In addition to the nature-based and other motifs described above, gingko leaves, trees, solid areas with a decorative border, and imported persian and oriental rugs with strong design elements were popular.

Rugs in the Craftsman, Bungalow, Prairie, or Mission style home should preferably be made from a soft wool.

Use of an appropriate rug pad is highly recommended as it provides safety from slippage, more cushioning, protects your floors, and extends the life of the rug.

Select New Reproduction Rugs to Complement Your Arts & Crafts Home Decor

We've personally chosen these because of the appropriateness of the designs and colors and the quality and value. All of these ship free and are available in different sizes. Most are also available in other colors.

Not sure what size area rug to get? Click Here.

A selection of Arts & Crafts style area rugs. Left to right: Momeni Nouveau Ivory Floral, Shaw Timber Creek Rug by Phillip Crowe, Shaw Phillip Crowe Timber Creek Mission Leaf Rug, American Craftsman Style Madison Area Rug. From
A selection of Arts & Crafts style area rugs. Left to right: Momeni Nouveau Ivory Floral, Shaw Timber Creek Rug by Phillip Crowe, Shaw Phillip Crowe Timber Creek Mission Leaf Rug, American Craftsman Style Madison Area Rug. From | Source
Source

Arts & Crafts Pottery & Metalware

The Quintessential Craftsman Home Accessories

Skill, craftsmanship and the use of local natural materials were the hallmarks of the Arts and Crafts Movement. In addition to woods, clay and metal were frequently used materials. Hand-crafted pottery and metal items were popular household items during the Craftsman era.

By the late 1890s there were hundreds of small pottery studios and metal manufacturers, each focused on blurring the distinction between art and utility. It was also a productive time for experimentation and many new glazes, techniques, and discoveries revolutionized the industry.

From ashtrays and bookends to cutlery, desk accessories, fireplace tools, hardware, pitchers, jardinieres, and vases, utilitarian art objects exemplified the Arts & Crafts philosophy and helped define the Craftsman style home.


The majority of metal items were made from copper but silver, brass and pewter were also used. In addition to fashioning items from various metals, metal was also used for lighting. Metal in Arts & Crafts period lighting can be structural, decorative (as in overlays on slag glass) or both.

Some pieces were cast in bronze, others were forged, such as ironwork, but most items were created by intense heating and stretching or bending and hammering create the design, which is usually drawn from nature. Glazing and hand burnishing complement the design and protect the finish. Although frequently more work intensive and expensive to make than pottery, Art metal is usually more affordable than art pottery.

Due to its emphasis on individual craftsmanship, most pieces produced during the Arts and Crafts era were signed. Some names to look for in metals include Heintz, Roycroft, Dirk Van Erp, Gustav Stickley, Buffalo Art Crafts and the Forest Craft Guild. However, don't be surprised if you come across a piece with a name that is not listed in any of the relevant references.

Working in copper was somewhat of a craft fad at the time and quite a few pieces made by amateurs can be found. These vary considerably in quality as one might expect but the prices are usually much lower than "name" pieces.

Potteries included Newcomb, Dedham, Grueby, Pewabic, Marblehead, Rookwood, Roycroft, Weller, Roseville and many others. Arts and Crafts pottery is highly collectible and prized so it also can be very highly priced. Although some pieces can still be found at garage sales and thrift shops on occasion, and one can still be lucky enough to get a great buy at auctions, it often seems that most affordable pieces have already been snatched up. Fortunately there are many high quality reproductions being produced by independent potters and small firms. Many of these not only feature typical Arts & Crafts shapes and motifs but also use the same glazing techniques from a hundred years ago.

Arts & Crafts Era Lighting - Adds A Warm Ambience to Your Home Decor

Photo Montage © 2011-15 Restoration Fabrics & Trims LLC
Photo Montage © 2011-15 Restoration Fabrics & Trims LLC

Beauty, harmony and utility exemplified the Arts & Crafts Movement philosophy. When these principles were applied to lighting the results ranged from primitive-like and boxy to Gothic inspired and intricate Art Nouveau designs. In addition to the usual types of Arts & Crafts motifs, designs also incorporated elements of classical and colonial revival styles.

Electric lighting was still new around the turn of the 20th century and most fixtures were attached to walls or ceilings and the designs incorporated metal "pipes" similar in appearance to the way gas fixtures were hung. Fixtures were not hung by chains until cloth-covered wiring became available. Styles ranged from simple single one-bulb pendants to more elaborate chandeliers with multiple arms and levels. Flush mounted fixtures might be used in kitchens, bathrooms and hallways but were not considered appropriate for more "public" areas of the house.

After 1910, due to the invention and availability of different bulbs, hanging bowl fixtures were also made, allowing for more indirect lighting. Some later Arts & Crafts or "Mission" light fixtures look garish with today's bulbs as they were designed for bulbs that gave a warmer, softer light.

Lighting for Arts & Crafts, Craftsman & Bungalow Interiors

Martini Mission Table Lamp, Comanche Two-Light Desk Table Lamp, and Square Inverted Mission Pendant. See these and more Meyda Tiffany Craftsman Arts & Crafts Style Light Fixtures available at
Martini Mission Table Lamp, Comanche Two-Light Desk Table Lamp, and Square Inverted Mission Pendant. See these and more Meyda Tiffany Craftsman Arts & Crafts Style Light Fixtures available at | Source

Arts & Crafts interiors were often dark due to the paneled walls and darker muted colors used, so table and floor lamps were also frequently used and staircases might feature a lamp mounted on the newel post.

The idea was to have "pools" of light to highlight or accent certain areas of the room, not to brighten the entire space.

It is important to realize that, although considered bright after years of gas and oil lamp lighting, the bulbs available at the time gave off light approximately equivalent to today's 25 watt incandescent bulbs.

Bases were usually metals like copper and bronze, but wood and pottery bases were also used. Shades were leaded, slag, or painted glass and mica in addition to parchment, fabric, paper and sometimes alabaster or leather. (Mica shades were made by forming sheets from the translucent flakes of the mineral combined with shellac.)

Lamps could also be made partially or entirely of wicker, sometimes with the shades lined in fabric. Styles ranged from simple geometric shapes to the elaborate designs of Louis Comfort Tiffany. Although we might think of lamps other than "Tiffany" style as plain, it was not unusual to find those also hung with prisms or trimmed in fringe to further diffuse the light.

Some Arts & Crafts lighting was individually hand-crafted while others were mass-produced or a combination of both methods. Whichever you choose, Arts & Crafts lighting was not designed just to brighten the nights. It was designed to add warmth and coziness to your home and is an essential part of Arts and Crafts interior design to consider when planning your home decor.

Mission Revival style Arts & Crafts era home. Note the the arches, adobe/stucco, and red tile roof style influenced by the Spanish missions of the southwest.
Mission Revival style Arts & Crafts era home. Note the the arches, adobe/stucco, and red tile roof style influenced by the Spanish missions of the southwest.

Mission Style

The Craftsman style of furniture most often associated with Gustav Stickley is often wrongly referred to as Mission style. This is incorrect because Mission style, and the subsequent Spanish Colonial revival style, refer to the style of the Spanish Missions of the southwestern United States, especially in California. Mission style features arches and have a definite Andalusian (Moorish-influenced Spanish) flavor.

What is generally referred to as Mission style today, including the ubiquitous category of "Mission Oak" furniture is frequently an incorrect label. The Mission style of the Arts and Crafts movement should more accurately be called Mission Revival, which enjoyed its greatest popularity between 1890 and 1915, actually preceding the Craftsman/Stickley style.

Mission Missives

Mission style conjures up the cultures of Morocco and North Africa, Spain, and Mexico.

It blends seamlessly with the artistic genius of southwestern, Native American, and a utopian Californian vision. In looking at these structures, it is difficult to remember that the Pueblo Indians first crafted expressions of Spanish Mission architecture under the supervision of Franciscan friars in the 1600s.

This book artfully puts the timeless beauty they created into perspective.

California Romantica
California Romantica

California Romantica features the most important, yet rarely seen, residential exemplars of the California Mission and Spanish Colonial styles. From whitewashed stucco walls and cloistered patios to tile roofs and sumptuous gardens, each house shown is a masterpiece, splendidly appointed with authentic Monterey furniture, California tile, and Navajo rugs. Among the seaside estates, canyon villas, and courtyard bungalows is Diane Keaton's former home in Beverly Hills, thoughtfully restored with noted designer Stephen Shadley, for which she has been recognized as a committed preservationist.

 

Mission Style Lighting

Quoizel La Parra 18-Light Chandelier with Scavo Glass Shades, Hinkley Casa Large Bowl Chandelier, Jeremiah Seville Imperial Bronze 12 Light Chandelier, and Casa 3 Light Chandelier in Olde Black. Also available in other types of lighting and sizes at
Quoizel La Parra 18-Light Chandelier with Scavo Glass Shades, Hinkley Casa Large Bowl Chandelier, Jeremiah Seville Imperial Bronze 12 Light Chandelier, and Casa 3 Light Chandelier in Olde Black. Also available in other types of lighting and sizes at | Source

Prairie Style

Prairie House Drawing by Frank Lloyd Wright, circa 1895-1910.
Prairie House Drawing by Frank Lloyd Wright, circa 1895-1910. | Source
The Wright Style: Re-Creating the Spirit of Frank Lloyd Wright
The Wright Style: Re-Creating the Spirit of Frank Lloyd Wright

Exquisite, detailed photos of interiors and exteriors of over 40 houses created by Frank Lloyd Wright and his followers.

 

The Prairie School originated in Chicago and refers to a style of architecture and interior design originated by Frank Lloyd Wright, who was influenced by Louis Sullivan. In turn, the style is also applied to the generation that followed Wright. It is mostly associated with the midwestern United States, but did spread to other areas.

For more about the Prairie school, see Arts and Crafts Period Interior Design and Home Decorating Part II.

Prairie Style Lighting for Period Decor

Top: Prairie Wall Sconce, M. Tiffany Prairie Chandelier, Murray Feiss Prairie House Lantern; Bottom: Kichler Desk Lamp, M. Tiffany Wright Butterfly Table Lamp, M. Tiffany Prairie Corn Pendant, M. Tiffany Prairie Wheat Floor Lamp.
Top: Prairie Wall Sconce, M. Tiffany Prairie Chandelier, Murray Feiss Prairie House Lantern; Bottom: Kichler Desk Lamp, M. Tiffany Wright Butterfly Table Lamp, M. Tiffany Prairie Corn Pendant, M. Tiffany Prairie Wheat Floor Lamp. | Source

Do You Have a Favorite Arts & Crafts Style?

Which Arts and Crafts Style do you like best?

See results

Like Interior Decorating Tips and/or Old Houses?

We're Glad You Stopped By!

Don't Forget

There's More in Part 2

For more about the Arts & Crafts Movement and the people who inspired and shaped it, be sure to see Part 2 of Arts and Crafts Period Interior Design and Home Decorating: Names to Know.

© 2011 Chazz

This space is for you - You know what to do

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    • teelover profile image

      teelover 3 years ago

      Great selection, thanks!

    • profile image

      appelonia 3 years ago

      Lots of nice information. Thanks!

    • ehomedesignidea1 profile image

      ehomedesignidea1 3 years ago

      I love crafting! If only I have all the time in the world to express my love for it, I'd surely have a house full of my creations. But then, superwoman needs to do other chores as well. :D

    • profile image

      ryangflo 3 years ago

      Really creative, thanks!

    • profile image

      LadyDuck 4 years ago

      Beautiful lens, I like the drawings, this is a style I really appreciate. Congratulations great work!

    • VineetBhandari profile image

      VineetBhandari 4 years ago

      Wow, very detailed lens Thanks for sharing

    • profile image

      adamluis 4 years ago

      Nice Work, Very Detailed

    • profile image

      cmadden 4 years ago

      You've given me a new appreciation for this style.

    • profile image

      anitabreeze 4 years ago

      This is one of my favorite styles. Great lens.

    • RoseAEckert profile image

      RoseAEckert 4 years ago

      Aww, I love arts and crafts, thank you for this page!

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      Love this page - helped me define the style that I love and gave me lots of ideas for the direction I want to take.

    • nanafisher profile image

      nanafisher 4 years ago

      Love the info, gives me some new ideas for my home. A great lens.

    • KateH2 profile image

      KateH2 4 years ago

      Wow this is a great lens with LOTS of information to read and digest! Our house was built in 1820 and we are working our way through redecorating in period colours and adding period features so I find these lenses in particular, very interesting.

    • TemporaryTattoo1 profile image

      TemporaryTattoo1 4 years ago

      Modern Furniture just doesn`t cut it for me. I love this lens, great pieces here abd great for getting the creative decorating juices going, thanks for another wonderful lens.

    • shewins profile image

      shewins 4 years ago

      I love the arts and crafts period. I have a Stickley chair and desk, lots of mission style furniture.

    • squidoopets profile image

      Darcie French 4 years ago from Abbotsford, BC

      Your home decor lenses are like a virtual trip into the many different eras and their decorating styles - very cool!

    • traveller27 profile image

      traveller27 4 years ago

      Back for another look - very nice!

    • profile image

      DecoratingMom411 4 years ago

      You have great ideas and your lens is very detailed and interesting! Thank you for sharing!

    • David Stone1 profile image

      David Stone 4 years ago from New York City

      I love this period. Very easy to live with. Nice presentation.

    • PNWtravels profile image

      Vicki Green 4 years ago from Wandering the Pacific Northwest USA

      I know little or nothing about home interior design, but I learned from this lens that the designs and look that I like are definitely of the craftsman period. Great info.

    • Dianne Loomos profile image

      Dianne Loomos 4 years ago

      I think the house in the TV series NUMB3RS was decorated in Arts & Crafts style. It was beautiful!

    • VspaBotanicals profile image

      VspaBotanicals 4 years ago

      Lovely!

    • LynetteBell profile image

      LynetteBell 4 years ago from Christchurch, New Zealand

      Really nice lens:)

    • profile image

      NYThroughTheLens 4 years ago

      Wow, wonderful lens with fantastic info. I have always loved the decor from this period but I wasn't aware that it was referred to as the Arts and Craft period. Fascinating.

    • karMALZEKE profile image

      karMALZEKE 4 years ago

      Wonderfully presented. I now know where to start. I love the Arts and Crafts period and style.

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      I just loved this a little while back and was thrilled to see it on the front page with a purple star, congratulations...this really is a beauty!

    • profile image

      MarcellaCarlton 4 years ago

      Astounding lens! I am completely wowed by all the information here.

    • profile image

      JoshK47 4 years ago

      Great design ideas! Blessed by a SquidAngel!

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      Cool lens thanks for sharing!

    • rachel young 12 profile image

      rachel young 12 4 years ago

      This is a fantastic lens; very informative and fascinating. I love the Arts and Crafts period!

    • SheilaMilne profile image

      SheilaMilne 4 years ago from Kent, UK

      The is a most comprehensive description of the Arts and Crafts movement. Excellent!

    • LiteraryMind profile image

      Ellen Gregory 4 years ago from Connecticut, USA

      A great lens about the craftsman period. So many examples of lamps and fabrics and accessories.

    • chas65 profile image

      chas65 4 years ago

      Being an antique dealer and antique enthusaist, this is one of my favorite styles. Happy to send blessings your way.

    • profile image

      Jennifer_Glennon 4 years ago

      I love the lighting collection that you have showed. It has given me a few ideas.

    • kimbesa2 profile image

      kimbesa 4 years ago from USA

      Awesome! I love the Arts and Crafts Style!

    • profile image

      DMVAgent 4 years ago

      wonderful lens you have... very neat designs... thanks for sharing this, i like it so much.

    • LoriBeninger profile image

      LoriBeninger 4 years ago

      Beautiful lens. I love this style. I had the privilege of attending the Legion of Honor's exhibition of Lalique/Tiffany/Fabrege a couple of years ago (San Francisco). My favorite piece was a hair comb shaped like two swallows, made of horn. Breathtaking. Thank you for this. The security word for this Comment is "uberwow." I think that's appropriate.

    • JuserTM profile image

      JuserTM 4 years ago

      Awesome lens, great job!

    • profile image

      HouseBuyersOfAmerica 5 years ago

      beautiful lens...nice descriptions with wonderful photographs...keep it up..

    • profile image

      davidrwells 5 years ago

      Fantastic Lens!! Though am not much of an art critic but it doesn't take an expert to appreciate the effort the author has put in writing this post.

    • profile image

      anonymous 5 years ago

      Great lens, nicely done! Thumbs up

    • TheWritingnag profile image

      Writing Nag 5 years ago from Colorado Springs, Colorado

      Love the Arts and Crafts Period! Beautiful photos!

    • TheWritingnag profile image

      Writing Nag 5 years ago from Colorado Springs, Colorado

      Love the Arts and Crafts Period! Beautiful photos!

    • TheWritingnag profile image

      Writing Nag 5 years ago from Colorado Springs, Colorado

      Love the Arts and Crafts Period! Beautiful photos!

    • profile image

      Jazroockfree 5 years ago

      Beautiful lens!Thanks from sharing and information

    • caffimages profile image

      caffimages 5 years ago

      What lovely ideas and comprehensive writing on this subject. I've recently moved into a UK 1930's house and was looking for ideas. Plenty here, thank you.

    • profile image

      anonymous 5 years ago

      I think I could be comfortable living right here, the Arts and Crafts Movement was a great crusade that we still get to enjoy the warmth and aesthetics of, I think they got it just right and you have represented it here to perfection!

    • buteoflyer2 profile image

      Kathie Miller 5 years ago from Southern California

      I love the Arts and Crafts style. The way they used nature for the design inspirations. This is a great lens. I would love to live in an Arts and Crafts home.

    • profile image

      anonymous 5 years ago

      Great lens on the Arts and Crafts period. Like that you touched on multiple facets of that design era..

    • profile image

      julieannbrady 5 years ago

      I've had a very informative visit today ... love the palette of nature colors! You can be my decorator any time you can free yourself up!

    • profile image

      snappycanvas 5 years ago

      These are all great and lovely ideas for the interior design of every home! Good job!

    • i Dia1 profile image

      i Dia1 5 years ago

      I really like this style of design. Those rugs are beautiful.

    • profile image

      anonymous 5 years ago

      LOVE ANYTHING DIFFERENT...VERY WELL PRESENTED LENS!

    • profile image

      TheDeeperWell 5 years ago

      One of the artists on the recent Studio Tour here in Three Rivers, CA, is a furniture maker who loves the arts and crafts movement. http://threeriversartstudiotour.com/badgley10.html Rick has taught me a lot about this design movement, so it was a lot of fun to read more about it on this informative lens.

    • SmBizGuru LM profile image

      SmBizGuru LM 5 years ago

      This is a really informative lens. I never new much about the Arts & Crafts design period and what the history is behind it. I watch lots of HGTV with my daughter who is a teenager but very into design and color. Now I'll know what they're talking about when they reference this design style.

    • profile image

      miaponzo 5 years ago

      Love your style :) Thanks! Blessings!

    • Margaret Schindel profile image

      Margaret Schindel 5 years ago from Massachusetts

      My husband once tried to explain the Craftsman style to me. This lens did it so much better! Thanks for another wonderfully informative lens.

    • ElizabethJeanAl profile image

      ElizabethJeanAl 5 years ago

      I like the arts and crafts look. I have several reproduction rugs. I love them

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      andrzejisosna 5 years ago

      A great lens with some beautiful items, I particulary love the tiffamy lamps.

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      BestLaminateInc1 5 years ago

      What a great ideas! I love Falling Water for many reasons: location, architecture, innovative interior...With many great ideas you provided here it is easy to be inspired to create something extraoridinary:)

    • PoetFlow profile image

      PoetFlow 5 years ago

      Arts and crafts live on!

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      woodgems 5 years ago

      Love Arts & Crafts. Yet another great lens!

    • Close2Art LM profile image

      Close2Art LM 5 years ago

      Wonderful lens in every way, Blessed!

    • ajgodinho profile image

      Anthony Godinho 5 years ago from Ontario, Canada

      Beautifully crafted and informational lens on the Arts and Crafts movement, and home decorating ideas. Blessed!

    • Diana Wenzel profile image

      Renaissance Woman 5 years ago from Colorado

      Very interesting article. A new insight for me was the connection of this style to philosophy and social activism. I have always appreciated and felt drawn to many elements of Arts and Crafts design and its variants. The aesthetic of nature and the attention to high quality craftsmanship is very appealing and fitting.

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      anonymous 5 years ago

      It is interesting to me to learn that the arts and crafts movement was also philosophical and political in nature. I enjoyed your lens. All the best.

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      sherioz 5 years ago

      Beautifully set up and informative. I'm just learning now about antiques and this is great for my continuing education!!

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      RocklawnArts 5 years ago

      Very cool. "Mission Revival" - I'll have to remember that.

    • AlisonMeacham profile image

      AlisonMeacham 5 years ago

      The arts and crafts period is a particular favorite style of mine. The Disney Grand Californian hotel is a wonderful example of the use of the style. Squid Angel Blessings to you

    • Blackspaniel1 profile image

      Blackspaniel1 5 years ago

      Well done

    • Gerald McConway profile image

      Gerald McConway 5 years ago

      great lens, great information, very well done!

    • aesta1 profile image

      Mary Norton 5 years ago from Ontario, Canada

      Your lens is a delight to read. Blessed!

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      TheCheshireCat 5 years ago

      Great lens. Just wish the antique pottery wasn't so expensive. I love it but will have to settle for reproductions for now I guess.

    • Anthony Altorenna profile image

      Anthony Altorenna 5 years ago from Connecticut

      I especially like the wood tones and textures of quarter-sawn oak used to build traditional Arts & Crafts furniture, and the styling is timeless. Nicely done!

    • FanfrelucheHubs profile image

      Nathalie Roy 5 years ago from France (Canadian expat)

      I love the Arts and Crafts period, especially the colors.

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      AlleyCatLane 5 years ago

      I love the Arts and Crafts architecture.

    • kimbesa2 profile image

      kimbesa 5 years ago from USA

      Beautiful showcase...thanks!

    • Scarlettohairy profile image

      Peggy Hazelwood 5 years ago from Desert Southwest, U.S.A.

      I love the Arts and Crafts style homes and decorating. The Frank Lloyd Wright house in Springfield, IL (the Dana Thomas House) has gorgeous Arts and Crafts details.

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