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Mandrake

Updated on May 16, 2014

Mandragora Autumnalis

Mandrake is a traditional witchcraft plant with much legend associated with it. The root was said to scream a horrible cry when pulled from the ground. This year I will be growing Mandrake for the very first time. I hope to grow a nice root for magickal uses. Mandrake is not easy to grow. It is very complex. I ordered a package of seeds online. I was sent 5 seeds to work with. They were ordered from a website called Alchemy-Works. The link is provided below.

Mandrake is considered a baneful herb. It is quite poisonous, but has been used in some home remedies. It was been used to treat diseases of the liver and bowels. Culpepper attributes this plant to Mercury. Other sources would attribute it to Saturn. There are 2 types of Mandrake. One is American and the other is European. You can use Mandrake to ward off bad energy in your home.

Saturn Governed Plants

Mandrake is a slow growing plant. Saturn is the planet in astrology which is considered slow moving. It used to be the slowest planet to orbit the earth before the outer planets were discovered. Many astrologers attribute slow growing plants to Saturn. Saturn also governs plants which are baneful.

Mandrake Illustrations

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Illustration from "The Home and School Reference Work, Volume V" by The Home and School Education Society, H. M. Dixon. Published in 1917.A mandrake, from: Jacob Meydenbach: Hortus sanitatis, 1491Illustration from William Turner's Herbal - Mandrake from between 1551 and 1568.
Illustration from "The Home and School Reference Work, Volume V" by The Home and School Education Society, H. M. Dixon. Published in 1917.
Illustration from "The Home and School Reference Work, Volume V" by The Home and School Education Society, H. M. Dixon. Published in 1917.
A mandrake, from: Jacob Meydenbach: Hortus sanitatis, 1491
A mandrake, from: Jacob Meydenbach: Hortus sanitatis, 1491
Illustration from William Turner's Herbal - Mandrake from between 1551 and 1568.
Illustration from William Turner's Herbal - Mandrake from between 1551 and 1568.

Witchcraft Uses For Mandrake

Mandrake was traditionally used in flying ointments. There is much debate as to what these flying ointments were created for. Some believe that these herbs help facilitate astral projection. Others believe that these herbs produce hallucinations. This is known as a psychotropic effect.

The most common use of Mandrake in witchcraft is to create a poppet. There are several ways to use poppets of this sort. The root resembles a human figure. It can be carved to look even more realistic. There are both love spells and prosperity spells which employ a Mandrake poppet. Healing rituals are another popular use.

To cast a love spell with a Mandrake root you need a piece of paper which is cut into a thin strip. You would write the name of the desired lover on this slip of paper. You would then wrap the paper around your Mandrake poppet.

For a prosperity spell you can carry the poppet around with you when it is wrapped in money.

Mandrake can be used as an energetic, purgative, to improve creative abilities, to strengthen magickal work, or for an exorcism.

Growing Mandrake

Mandrake is a low growing plant. It is a perennial. The flowers are white. They turn into green berries. These berries become yellow when ripe.

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