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Get a Bridge Calendar 2013 for the Bridge Fanatic You Love

Updated on April 5, 2013

Great gift for Bridge Players

The true Bridge fanatic wants nothing more then a Bridge calendar on the wall. Every day the joy of learning something new about Bridge and having a little bit of time for his or her favorite passtime. The Bridge calendar makes an ideal gift for a Bridge player so if you know someone and need a gift don't hesistate.

If you are new to Bridge it's better to buy a book for beginners about bridge. Do start learning the game of Bridge because it's a fascinating card game that will bring you a lot of good times. You play this game together with your partner who is seated on the opposite side of you at the table. Every game you try to score more points then your competitors. You accomplish this by by anticipating future moves by your opposition. Everyone can learn this game and once you get it, it's a lot of fun. Because you play against other duo's Bridge is a very social sport.

History

The first bridges were made by nature itself â as simple as a log fallen across a stream or stones in the river. The first bridges made by humans were probably spans of cut wooden logs or planks and eventually stones, using a simple support and crossbeam arrangement. Some early Americans used trees or bamboo poles to cross small caverns or wells to get from one place to another. A common form of lashing sticks, logs, and deciduous branches together involved the use of long reeds or other harvested fibers woven together to form a connective rope capable of binding and holding together the materials used in early bridges.

The Arkadiko Bridge in Greece (13th century BC), one of the oldest arch bridges in existence

The Arkadiko Bridge is one of four Mycenaean corbel arch bridges part of a former network of roads, designed to accommodate chariots, between Tiryns to Epidauros in the Peloponnese, in Greece. Dating to the Greek Bronze Age (13th century BC), it is one of the oldest arch bridges still in existence and use. Several intact arched stone bridges from the Hellenistic era can be found in the Peloponnese in southern Greece[1]

The greatest bridge builders of antiquity were the ancient Romans.[2] The Romans built arch bridges and aqueducts that could stand in conditions that would damage or destroy earlier designs. Some stand today.[3] An example is the Alcántara Bridge, built over the river Tagus, in Spain. The Romans also used cement, which reduced the variation of strength found in natural stone.[4] One type of cement, called pozzolana, consisted of water, lime, sand, and volcanic rock. Brick and mortar bridges were built after the Roman era, as the technology for cement was lost then later rediscovered.

The Arthashastra of Kautilya mentions the construction of dams and bridges.[5] A Mauryan bridge near Girnar was surveyed by James Princep.[6] The bridge was swept away during a flood, and later repaired by Puspagupta, the chief architect of emperor Chandragupta I.[6] The bridge also fell under the care of the Yavana Tushaspa, and the Satrap Rudra Daman.[6] The use of stronger bridges using plaited bamboo and iron chain was visible in India by about the 4th century.[7] A number of bridges, both for military and commercial purposes, were constructed by the Mughal administration in India.[8]

Although large Chinese bridges of wooden construction existed at the time of the Warring States, the oldest surviving stone bridge in China is the Zhaozhou Bridge, built from 595 to 605 AD during the Sui Dynasty. This bridge is also historically significant as it is the world's oldest open-spandrel stone segmental arch bridge. European segmental arch bridges date back to at least the Alconétar Bridge (approximately 2nd century AD), while the enormous Roman era Trajan's Bridge (105 AD) featured open-spandrel segmental arches in wooden construction.

Rope bridges, a simple type of suspension bridge, were used by the Inca civilization in the Andes mountains of South America, just prior to European colonization in the 16th century.

The first cast iron bridge, built in 1779

During the 18th century there were many innovations in the design of timber bridges by Hans Ulrich, Johannes Grubenmann, and others. The first book on bridge engineering was written by Hubert Gautier in 1716. A major breakthrough in bridge technology came with the erection of the Iron Bridge in Coalbrookdale, England in 1779. It used cast iron for the first time as arches to cross the river Severn.

With the Industrial Revolution in the 19th century, truss systems of wrought iron were developed for larger bridges, but iron did not have the tensile strength to support large loads. With the advent of steel, which has a high tensile strength, much larger bridges were built, many using the ideas of Gustave Eiffel.

In 1927 welding pioneer Stefan BryÅa designed the first welded road bridge in the world, which was later built across the river SÅudwia Maurzyce near Åowicz, Poland in 1929. In 1995, the American Welding Society presented the Historic Welded Structure Award for the bridge to Poland.[9]

[edit]Types of bridges

BRIDGE CALENDAR 2013

Great Bridge calendar with one page for every day. Fantastic gift to any Bridge fanatic. Put this Bridge calendar somewhere in your home where yo spend some time every day and you will learn something new about Bridge from this calendar every day. Improve your game without studying as time passes.

BridgePartner Bidding Device

Bidding Boxes can be very usefull supplies for regular Bridge players. If you want to host a game with friends at home they are invaluabe. This is a very good set that will last a long time. My parents have been playing with their set for over ten years.

Bridge Partner Bidding Device with Laquered Cards (Set of 4) Boxes
Bridge Partner Bidding Device with Laquered Cards (Set of 4) Boxes

Easy open and close

Stackable for storage

Durable lacquered bidding cards

Mountable

 

Barclay Bridge Size Playing Cards - Double Boxed Cards-12 decks

Great gift set of cards for frequent players of Bridge, Gin Rummy or Canasta. They are very well made by Barclay. If you are not a player yourself and want to gift this, don't be turned off because they are plastic because plastic is the best kind of material for playing cards if you are a frequent player. I have played a lot of cards and owned countless decks but nothing can beat well made plastic decks. They last a long time, don't get marked as easily and they are easy to shuffle well. Everything a real card player wants really.

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    • DrBillSmithWriter profile image

      William Leverne Smith 4 years ago from Hollister, MO

      Neat to be a first like on a lens! ;-)