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Dandelion Flowers

Updated on June 22, 2013

Why Does Everyone Hate Dandelion Flowers

I love the golden yellow bright against the green lawn. That is Spring to me. If it wasn't for the dandelion, I think I would be a lot more gloomier during this trying time of the year. Yes it is Spring but until everything dries out a bit , Spring is also the dirtiest season with the cold and wet and mud and rain before everything starts to grow.

Spring also shows the most pleasing changes I think. Starting cold and wet and ending sunny and bright. Just like a dandelion. Smile. It is probably the first bouquet you ever gave your Mom. Stop teaching your kids that dandelions are bad. Kids love them.

Photo Credits

Dandelion Flowers

The Ultimate Dandelion Cookbook
The Ultimate Dandelion Cookbook

Did you know Dnadelions are edible? And not just the leaves

 
Spring Flower Yellow Dandelion Live Wallpaper
Spring Flower Yellow Dandelion Live Wallpaper

Take your dandelions with you where ever you go

 

What Is So Good About Dandelion Flowers

Ready for picking and eating
Ready for picking and eating

Dandelions are members of the Aster family native to Eurasia and were brought to North America by the first settlers over 300 years ago. Since then they have established themselves through out North America. The name Dandelion is French for Lions Tooth which describes the shapes of the edible leaves.

In fact. all parts of the dandelion are edible. The young leaves for salad greens, the older leaves for cooked vegetable, the flowers for making dandelion wine and the roots, when dried and powdered, can make a coffee-like drink. It was even used as a medicinal herb back in Europe as a cure or aid for liver or bile troubles and even as a diuretic.

It is a truly versatile plant and it's no wonder they brought it over with them when the settlers came.

What Is Not So good

not so good for eating
not so good for eating

Dandelions propagate rapidly with a very rapid life cycle. They are evasive and grow everywhere and anywhere. They have gotten the name of being a weed because of this but it doesn't mean it is bad. Unless, of course, you are one of the obsessive -compulsive people that requires a mono colored lawn. You keep working at it, I am sure you eventually get there.

Golf courses, I can see why they hate dandelions, but then again golfers? People who think chasing a little white ball around is entertaining. I am just kidding.

It's the way dandelions propagate that makes them so prolific. It also explains why dandelions seem to learn how to duck the lawn mower blades. They are asexual and basically clone themselves. So this means that when a dandelion survives long enough to turn to seed, those thousands of wind borne seeds will be exactly like the one that made the seeds. All those dandelions that ducked the first mow of grass, propagates into thousands. That's how dandelions learn to duck.

What side of the fence are you on?

Dandelions are not native to North America but they are here to stay. Where do you stand?

Dandelions were probably the first bouquet you gave your Mom... remember?

A-Redneck says:

I hate that people use chemicals on the dandelion. Bees feed on them in the spring.

What I Use Dandelions For

I know you think dandelions, you think dandelion wine. I don't make dandelion wine though. I have tried it, just never made it myself. Just looking on the net though, you'll find lots of recipes for dandelion wine. Some use the whole flower head others just the petals. From experience, use just the petals. It may be more work but it makes for a wine that is not as bitter.

I like salad greens. After a long winter of iceberg lettuce salads harvesting greens from the lawn before they come up in the garden is a treat. I use the young leaves only as the older leaves are bitter. If you only have the older leaves to work with you can blanch them like spinach. A trick I learned from a neighbor when I was younger is to cover the section of dandelions you wish to harvest from with a sheet of cardboard. This blocks the sunlight from them and they grow blanched, similar to the technique one uses to grow celery. In this way even the longer leaves are tender and tasty.

As with any wild edibles it is best to eat sparingly, One never knows the full effect of large quantities will do to you. Being a diuretic means you'll be going to that bathroom more often and in some cases you get dehydrated so be careful about eating wild food in excess. A salad is not an excess., so no worries.

Photo Credit

If you are lost in thought and

If stress is upon you or not

Make a wish and wish real hard

Then blow a dandelion seed head

and see you wish come true...

What Do Dandelions Mean To You

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    • Green-horizon profile image

      Green-horizon 

      5 years ago

      Good job.

    • Northerntrials profile imageAUTHOR

      Northerntrials 

      5 years ago

      @HughSmulders LM: Cool I like Ray Bradbury but I don't think I have read that story. I'll give it a look see.

    • k4shmir profile image

      k4shmir 

      5 years ago

      nice lens. thanks for sharing.

    • HughSmulders LM profile image

      HughSmulders LM 

      5 years ago

      My favorite book is Dandelion Wine by Ray Bradbury. Your article has inspired me to reread it again! =)

    • Northerntrials profile imageAUTHOR

      Northerntrials 

      5 years ago

      @maryseena: Let me know ow it goes....

    • maryseena profile image

      maryseena 

      5 years ago

      Thanks for sharing the trick you learned from your neighbor. I'll try that to make the leaves more palatable.

    • Northerntrials profile imageAUTHOR

      Northerntrials 

      5 years ago

      @anonymous: Wonderful observation. I love it.

    • Northerntrials profile imageAUTHOR

      Northerntrials 

      5 years ago

      @GameHelp: Thanks.

    • theserpentisris profile image

      theserpentisris 

      5 years ago

      @Redneck Lady Luck: As much as I don't care for dandelions in my yard, I refrain from using sprays. A good weeding tool is far more cost effective and won't leave behind unsightly "dead-spaghetti" as my wife likes to call it.

    • profile image

      anonymous 

      5 years ago

      Dandelion looks so bright in the green lawn, just looks like stars are shining in the dark sky.

    • profile image

      GameHelp 

      5 years ago

      They do look beautiful I'll give you that. :)

      Great lens!

    • Faye Rutledge profile image

      Faye Rutledge 

      5 years ago from Concord VA

      I know some people hate them in their yard, but I could never understand why. They're a pretty little flower to me. Take advantage of it. :)

    • profile image

      anonymous 

      5 years ago

      I love the golden yellow bright against the green lawn

    • Northerntrials profile imageAUTHOR

      Northerntrials 

      5 years ago

      @PromptWriter: I hear yah. I am usually reminded of that fact the first time I have to shovel snow...

    • Northerntrials profile imageAUTHOR

      Northerntrials 

      5 years ago

      @jlshernandez: No problem. Ièm glad to be of some service.

    • PromptWriter profile image

      Moe Wood 

      5 years ago from Eastern Ontario

      Most of my backyard is dandelions. And clover. There's grass but well, let's not go there. I think they are beautiful and do not mind them at all, except when they grow between the cracks of the sidewalk/driveway -- hard to remove there.

    • jlshernandez profile image

      jlshernandez 

      5 years ago

      I never knew dandelions were edible. Thanks for the education and interesting info.

    • Northerntrials profile imageAUTHOR

      Northerntrials 

      5 years ago

      @Redneck Lady Luck: Very good point. Can I quote you on this? It is so important and I have had 25 years to turn my wife's POV of bees and wasps around. She thinks she's allergic to them but she's not most everyone swells when they get stung. Her problem is an acquired reaction - a panic attack. I've even gone as far to show her by letting them crawl on me

    • Redneck Lady Luck profile image

      Lorelei Cohen 

      5 years ago from Canada

      I wish more people would view the dandelion as an early spring flower and stop using poisons to remove them. Our pollinators are so very important and they are having such a difficult time surviving this pesticide use.

    • Northerntrials profile imageAUTHOR

      Northerntrials 

      5 years ago

      @PhilNext: I often wonder if some of these names were made-up or twisted enough just made to sound good. Thanks for the info.

    • profile image

      PhilNext 

      5 years ago

      More informations : if dandelion name is french 'dent de lion', this name is not very used in french language, mainly replaced by the not very romantic 'pissenlit' (from the diuretic properties : 'to piss' ).

    • Northerntrials profile imageAUTHOR

      Northerntrials 

      5 years ago

      @lesliesinclair: It is interesting just how useful they are and I wonder who started this cultural hate on for dandelions. Maybe he was a golfer.

    • Coffee-Break profile image

      Dorian Bodnariuc 

      5 years ago from Ottawa, Ontario Canada

      I love dandelions. I think they are beautiful on a green lawn, though I wouldn't like the lawn invaded by them.

    • lesliesinclair profile image

      lesliesinclair 

      5 years ago

      They used to seem like a plague. I wasn't interested in making the wine and did want a pure green lawn, but I think that was just a cultural thing. Now I think dandelions are fine, since I've learned about some of their healthy uses in food and drink.

    • Northerntrials profile imageAUTHOR

      Northerntrials 

      5 years ago

      @Anthony Altorenna: The best I can describe the young leaves is tangy bitter like watercress or rocket. It;s a nice addition but don't make a whole salad of the leaves. Try it and thanks for visiting.

    • Anthony Altorenna profile image

      Anthony Altorenna 

      5 years ago from Connecticut

      I've got plenty of dandelions to go around, and the kids love to pick the flowers. So far, I haven't gathered the courage to make a dandelion salad but maybe someday....

    • Northerntrials profile imageAUTHOR

      Northerntrials 

      5 years ago

      @shewins: I like blowing the seed heads and watching the seeds drift off. I'll have to use my new camera and take a movie of it against the mountain backdrop this week. Thanks for visiting and the comments. I appreciate it.

    • shewins profile image

      shewins 

      5 years ago

      I love Dandelions, in fact I even plant them in flower pots along with other colorful plants. They don't take over there and look pretty. I don't really have lawns, so they don't bother me.

    • Northerntrials profile imageAUTHOR

      Northerntrials 

      5 years ago

      @LiteraryMind: I guess some old ways are better. Thanks.

    • LiteraryMind profile image

      Ellen Gregory 

      5 years ago from Connecticut, USA

      You taught me some things I didn't know about dandelions. Both my grandmother's used to put some dandelion leaves in salads with other mixed greens.

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