ArtsAutosBooksBusinessEducationEntertainmentFamilyFashionFoodGamesGenderHealthHolidaysHomeHubPagesPersonal FinancePetsPoliticsReligionSportsTechnologyTravel

How to Build a Bug Hotel or Hibernaculum

Updated on September 24, 2013

What is a Hibernaculum?

Hibernacula (the plural of hibernaculum) are often referred to as bug or insect hotels. They are specially designed structures that offer small invertebrates like solitary bees places to spend the winter where they can stay (relatively) warm, dry and safe from predictors.

As a Landscape Architect I have often built and specified hibernacula of varying types and sizes for varying purposes. The simplest I have prescribed have been simply piles of logs left in a stack after felling trees. Often in gardens a more aesthetic approach is required. In this lens I will show you how you can do your bit for biodiversity and sustainability and build a hibernaculum that not only looks good, but will also provided much needed habitat for wildlife in your garden or yard.

Hibernaculum detail
Hibernaculum detail

Why You Should Definitely Build a Hibernaculum in Your Yard or Garden

It can't have escaped your attention that the world's population of bees is falling drastically. Whilst there are likely many factors effecting the decline in bees and other insects (such as inappropriate use of insecticides, destruction of habitat, scarcity of food sources etc), I personally believe the loss of over-wintering sites also plays a large part in their decline.

Many insects hibernate over winter in secluded spots in holes in standing deadwood and in soft rock and brickwork. Sadly we have lost a lot of this valuable hibernation habitat.

Why the decline in certain invertebrates is a bad thing

Any decrease in biodiversity has knock on effects that ultimately reduce the resilience of an ecosystem. Put bluntly if a population of just one organism drastically declines the whole system is weakened and can become vulnerable. If this happens other species can become vulnerable. For example if we loose bees we loose our pollinators and our crops don't get pollinated. which means food shortages for us.

But we can help

By building a hibernaculum in your yard or garden you can provide a valuable home to insects, bees, grubs, all sorts. This in turn provides food for birds and hedgehogs etc.

Photo credit: quimby

Wildlife Gardening Resources

Wildlife Gardening
Wildlife Gardening

A great book for introducing your children to gardening for wildlife

 

What You Will Need to Build Your Hibernaculum

You will be able to find everything you need free of charge from your neighbourhood

I think the best hibernacula are made of a range of materials to give the widest possible choice for the wildlife in your garden. As I said above I have specified very simplistic hibernacula in the past constructed of nothing more than cut logs, leaf litter and earth. If these are all the materials you have to hand, then you can still make a decent hibernaulum!

Personally I prefer natural materials to make hiberrnacula. You may have seen some constructed using car or truck tyres, plastics, and concrete products. Whilst is possible for creepy-crawlies to make their over-winter homes within these materials I think it is better, both ecologically and aesthetically, to use a pallet of natural materials.

Here's a list of materials that I favour:

Soft

Logs

Sawn (untreated) timber

Scrap wood such as (untreated) timber pallets or railway sleepers

Wood shavings and sawdust

Straw

Newspapers (see note below)

Hessian and sackcloth

Leaf mould

Hard

Bricks (preferably of the stock variety and not engineering bricks)

Clay pavers

Clay roof tiles

Natural stone paving slabs

Clay pipes

Stones

Gravel

Sourcing Materials

Its amazing what you can get for free. I once got a beautifully turned wooden display bowl from a green-waste recycling facility (I rescued it before it went in and asked the contractor if I could have it). I cleaned it up, sanded it down, and gave it to my mother as a present.

There might be a temptation to take items out of a skip, bin, dumpster, debris box, or similar. DON'T! Even if the item has been placed within the skip, and the skip/dumpster is on the public highway, it is still owned by the person who has thrown it away. Placing an item within a skip does not actually imply that the owner no longer wants it (legally). I've fallen foul of this myself. Once I was laying a patio at a client's house and loading the excavated debris into a skip on the road outside the front of the house. When I went for lunch I left my wheelbarrow on the skip, so it was out of the way. I came back half an hour later and it was gone!. Of course you can always ask the owner if you can take something from the skip.

Designing Your Hibernaculum

Use of Hibernaculua Materials

Material Choices

The list above is by no means exhaustive, feel free to add any other materials to your hibernaculum. Just make sure they are natural materials/products

I always aim to get a mix of soft and hard materials. I know many other designers will use only hard materials in their hibernacula, but there are two good reasons for including soft materials.

The first reason I believe adding soft hibernacula materials is a good idea is that they are often naturally insulating. The addition of things like straw and Hessian can offer protection against the harshest of the winter temperatures for hibernating wildlife.

The second reason is that these materials are preferred by some species. Whilst some species are happy to hunker down under a rock for the winter, others prefer to burrow into deadwood. Offering a mixture of materials simply widens the appeal of your hibernaculum for local wildlife.

Structural Integrity

It should be expected that the soft materials within your hibernaculum will degrade over time. This is natural and the best thing for the hibernaculum. Let the materials decompose naturally, and don't be tempted to keep you bug hotel too clean and tidy. Let it age gracefully.

My top tip: Make sure the basic structure of the hibernaculum is constructed of hard materials, or at least soft materials that will last. You often see hibernacula made of pallets and thin wood. Whilst there's nothing wrong with using these materials in a hibernaculum, they will degrade faster than brick, clay, and stone. This can lead to your hibernaculum collapsing prematurely. I recommend building the basic structure of hard materials, making shelves and then filling the shelves with soft materials. That way you will be able to keep the structure for many years and simply replace the soft materials once they have degenerated past to the point where they are no longer useful for wildlife to use for hibernation.

Building your Hibernaculum

How to build a really good bug hotel

Foundations

Some people recommend lifting your hibernaculum of the ground on bricks or the like. The theory being it helps keep your materials drier, thus slowing their decomposition. Personally I prefer to set hibernacula directly on the ground. This is more natural, and will give easier access for non-flying invertebrates to take up residence. Provided you follow my advice and build the structure out of hard materials it doesn't matter if the soft materials in the lower level rot off quicker.

Start by sraping back the grass or other vegetation. Create a level area, slightly larger than your planned hibernaculum.

Next you are ready to start building the structure.

Structure

I like to create a bed of crushed concrete or stone to ensure I can get a level surface to build up from.

You can create the structure using pallets, railway sleepers, or old concrete posts.

You are aiming for a layered approach, like a high rise.

Another way to build the structure is to make side and back walls from, say pallets.

The structure wants to be built so that it will stand up with only the hard (or more durable soft) materials.

Experiment with what you like.

I think a good hibernaculum can be beautiful as well as functional.

Don't be afraid of using garden wire to secure the pieces of the structure together.

Filling the Structure

Once the basic structure is in place you can fill up the gaps with your soft materials.

With logs or other wood it pays to drills holes of varying sizes in the ends to allow easy access for the creepy-crawlies.

Aesthetics

Keep in mind the look of the hibernaculum. Take a look at some of the examples I've posted here.

Hibernacula Inspriation - Take a look at these beautiful bug hotels

Click thumbnail to view full-size
Claire Whitehouse has created a beautiful hibernaculum for her 2005 'The Real Rubbish' garden Photo credit and more info: http://tinyurl.com/p5lwsfqThis hibernaculum makes great use of of an odd space to create an interesting and varied bug hotel.Photo credit: http://tinyurl.com/pavhnomA mini hibernaculum proving you don't need a lot of space! Photo credit: http://tinyurl.com/qf3sxnpThis hibernaculum looks great, but lacks structural integrity. Given a few years you may find some of the materials falling out...The size and range of materials in this hibernaculum are inspiring. Photo credit: http://tinyurl.com/pc2vajlThatch is a great habitat for some animals. If you know a thatcher why not build a roof on your hibernaculum? Photo credit: http://tinyurl.com/paeq57y
Claire Whitehouse has created a beautiful hibernaculum for her 2005 'The Real Rubbish' garden Photo credit and more info: http://tinyurl.com/p5lwsfq
Claire Whitehouse has created a beautiful hibernaculum for her 2005 'The Real Rubbish' garden Photo credit and more info: http://tinyurl.com/p5lwsfq
This hibernaculum makes great use of of an odd space to create an interesting and varied bug hotel.Photo credit: http://tinyurl.com/pavhnom
This hibernaculum makes great use of of an odd space to create an interesting and varied bug hotel. Photo credit: http://tinyurl.com/pavhnom
A mini hibernaculum proving you don't need a lot of space! Photo credit: http://tinyurl.com/qf3sxnp
A mini hibernaculum proving you don't need a lot of space! Photo credit: http://tinyurl.com/qf3sxnp
This hibernaculum looks great, but lacks structural integrity. Given a few years you may find some of the materials falling out...
This hibernaculum looks great, but lacks structural integrity. Given a few years you may find some of the materials falling out...
The size and range of materials in this hibernaculum are inspiring. Photo credit: http://tinyurl.com/pc2vajl
The size and range of materials in this hibernaculum are inspiring. Photo credit: http://tinyurl.com/pc2vajl
Thatch is a great habitat for some animals. If you know a thatcher why not build a roof on your hibernaculum? Photo credit: http://tinyurl.com/paeq57y
Thatch is a great habitat for some animals. If you know a thatcher why not build a roof on your hibernaculum? Photo credit: http://tinyurl.com/paeq57y

I would love to hear your comments. - Have you ever built a hibernaculum/bug hotel?

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment

    • ashleydpenn profile image
      Author

      ashleydpenn 4 years ago

      @AcornOakForest: Thanks for stopping by and taking the time to comment, KampSeagull. I tried to reply via email, but it seems it didn't work?! But I agree with you. I think these hiburnacula are vitally important in the urban environment. I do however also think that they can look nice in a rural setting as well. :)

    • ashleydpenn profile image
      Author

      ashleydpenn 4 years ago

      @Virginia Allain: Thank you Vallian. I think this idea has real potential to help children get to know all sorts of creepy crawlies.

    • AcornOakForest profile image

      Monica Lobenstein 4 years ago from Western Wisconsin

      I live in a rural area where there is no shortage of natural nooks and crannies for insects but I love this idea for urban areas.

    • Virginia Allain profile image

      Virginia Allain 4 years ago from Central Florida

      Several of my sisters studied entomology as children. They would have loved this.

    working

    This website uses cookies

    As a user in the EEA, your approval is needed on a few things. To provide a better website experience, hubpages.com uses cookies (and other similar technologies) and may collect, process, and share personal data. Please choose which areas of our service you consent to our doing so.

    For more information on managing or withdrawing consents and how we handle data, visit our Privacy Policy at: "https://hubpages.com/privacy-policy#gdpr"

    Show Details
    Necessary
    HubPages Device IDThis is used to identify particular browsers or devices when the access the service, and is used for security reasons.
    LoginThis is necessary to sign in to the HubPages Service.
    Google RecaptchaThis is used to prevent bots and spam. (Privacy Policy)
    AkismetThis is used to detect comment spam. (Privacy Policy)
    HubPages Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide data on traffic to our website, all personally identifyable data is anonymized. (Privacy Policy)
    HubPages Traffic PixelThis is used to collect data on traffic to articles and other pages on our site. Unless you are signed in to a HubPages account, all personally identifiable information is anonymized.
    Amazon Web ServicesThis is a cloud services platform that we used to host our service. (Privacy Policy)
    CloudflareThis is a cloud CDN service that we use to efficiently deliver files required for our service to operate such as javascript, cascading style sheets, images, and videos. (Privacy Policy)
    Google Hosted LibrariesJavascript software libraries such as jQuery are loaded at endpoints on the googleapis.com or gstatic.com domains, for performance and efficiency reasons. (Privacy Policy)
    Features
    Google Custom SearchThis is feature allows you to search the site. (Privacy Policy)
    Google MapsSome articles have Google Maps embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    Google ChartsThis is used to display charts and graphs on articles and the author center. (Privacy Policy)
    Google AdSense Host APIThis service allows you to sign up for or associate a Google AdSense account with HubPages, so that you can earn money from ads on your articles. No data is shared unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    Google YouTubeSome articles have YouTube videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    VimeoSome articles have Vimeo videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    PaypalThis is used for a registered author who enrolls in the HubPages Earnings program and requests to be paid via PayPal. No data is shared with Paypal unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    Facebook LoginYou can use this to streamline signing up for, or signing in to your Hubpages account. No data is shared with Facebook unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    MavenThis supports the Maven widget and search functionality. (Privacy Policy)
    Marketing
    Google AdSenseThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Google DoubleClickGoogle provides ad serving technology and runs an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Index ExchangeThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    SovrnThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Facebook AdsThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Amazon Unified Ad MarketplaceThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    AppNexusThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    OpenxThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Rubicon ProjectThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    TripleLiftThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Say MediaWe partner with Say Media to deliver ad campaigns on our sites. (Privacy Policy)
    Remarketing PixelsWe may use remarketing pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to advertise the HubPages Service to people that have visited our sites.
    Conversion Tracking PixelsWe may use conversion tracking pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to identify when an advertisement has successfully resulted in the desired action, such as signing up for the HubPages Service or publishing an article on the HubPages Service.
    Statistics
    Author Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide traffic data and reports to the authors of articles on the HubPages Service. (Privacy Policy)
    ComscoreComScore is a media measurement and analytics company providing marketing data and analytics to enterprises, media and advertising agencies, and publishers. Non-consent will result in ComScore only processing obfuscated personal data. (Privacy Policy)
    Amazon Tracking PixelSome articles display amazon products as part of the Amazon Affiliate program, this pixel provides traffic statistics for those products (Privacy Policy)