ArtsAutosBooksBusinessEducationEntertainmentFamilyFashionFoodGamesGenderHealthHolidaysHomeHubPagesPersonal FinancePetsPoliticsReligionSportsTechnologyTravel

Antique Jacobean Furniture

Updated on April 28, 2018
Source

Jacobean furniture is sturdy, massive in size, notoriously uncomfortable, and made to last.

By Sharon Stajda,

The term Jacobean furniture is a term used to cover all English style furniture from the reign of King James, to King James II. However, throughout this span of time Jacobean furniture showed markedly different influences. The earliest Jacobean furniture was influenced mainly by Elizabethan (1603 -1688) styled furniture. Commonwealth Style (1649-1660) marks the middle of the Jacobean Period when the furniture was of simpler design and under-decorated. The late Jacobean Period is that of the Carolean period, named for King Charles II. In this period, the furniture was influenced by Flemish Baroque design.

Early English Jacobean furniture was widely copied by the colonial Americans, although the furniture was more primitive because there were fewer skilled furniture makers living in America at the time. In true patriotic form, American colonists renamed their Jacobean reproductions that of "Early American" furniture.

Source

The Features Of True Jacobean Furniture

Jacobean furniture was built very sturdy, massive in size, notoriously uncomfortable, and made to last. The furniture pieces that were produced consisted mainly of chests, cupboards, trestle tables, wainscot chairs, and gate legged circular tables. Brewster and Carver chairs (made with numerous spindles filling their straight frames) were also produced, their names are taken from two distinguished American Colonists of the period.


Types Of Wood Used In The Making Of Jacobean Furniture

The Woods Used In Jacobean Furniture

Oak and pine were the most popular woods of choice for the furniture makers of the Jacobean era. Chairs would often have split spindles, bulbous Spanish carved feet, and rush seats. Chests, large cupboards, and trestle tables were embellished with Flemish scrolls, ornately carved panels, and ornamental twists. These design elements made the massive Jacobean pieces appear very formal and stately.

Source
Source

The Construction Of Jacobean Furniture Simple Yet Very Sturdy

As a rule, Jacobean furniture construction was simple. It was assembled with mortise and tenon joints, held together with pegs. The majority of lines are square and rectangular, most with flat-fronted surfaces. The art of inlay and veneering added a wonderful ornate look, especially in cupboards and cabinets. Many pieces were painted, which further added to the style of the piece.

Upholstering materials used for Jacobean chairs and settees were of fine quality, and very ornate. Materials such as silk, tapestries, crewelwork, linen, velvet, and even leather were used on various types of chairs.

Jacobean period furniture can mainly be found in the auction houses of England. Being built to last, many pieces have not only survived but are still in good condition.

Love Antiques? Visit The Online Encyclopedia Of Antiques - At Old And Sold.You will be pleasantly surprised at the A-Z information listed on Antiques. Please visit.

Photo Gallery

Click thumbnail to view full-size

Charles II Period Chest

Source

History And Jacobean Furniture

Jacobean Period

SOVEREIGNS, JAMES I, CHARLES I, CROMWELL, CHARLES II, JAMES II

And now having proceeded with our studies in chronological order, we reach the second period of the Renaissance in England, a period essentially native. The shackles of the Italian masters were slipped off, and with hands-free to express thought actually the decorative artists produced something peculiarly their own. As was the custom, the style was not named for its originators, but for the house that occupied the throne during its growth. So we call this decorative period Stuart or Jacobean.

Jacobean Or Restoration Furniture

Influences at work - Characteristics of designs - Furniture of the Restoration-Distinctive types sprang up. The furniture that which was made soon after the Restoration, and the style that continued to be followed with more or less change and development during the reigns of Charles H. and James II. in fact until Dutch influence made itself felt and an entirely new phase came about in the history of the furniture trade.

The Early Jacobean Period -1600-1620

THERE was a very close affinity between the Elizabethan and early Jacobean periods, and the two really form one continuous style in which the profusion and over-elaboration of the former period became modified during the first twenty years of the 17th century.

The general system of house planning was very similar to that in the previous reign, although an attempt to produce a more ordered arrangement of rooms was apparent. The true spirit of the Renaissance, however, was not yet properly understood, and the general misapplication of the decorative details continued.

The Later Jacobean Period -1620-1660

The first architect in England to appreciate the true significance of classic design was Inigo Jones, whose first important work was the rebuilding of Whitehall Palace in 1619. His work, although owing its origin to the same source as that of the contemporary craftsmen in England, was of a definitely different character from theirs. He eliminated all that remained of the Gothic tradition and designed with a thorough knowledge of the correct principles of the Palladian style. Although his productions were thus considerably advanced, his influence did not become general for many years; perhaps, because of it. The somewhat vague and inconsistent work of the Elizabethan and early Jacobean periods was still continued contemporaneously.

The Inigo Jones Jacobean Period -1620-1660

The mansions built from 1620 to the end of the Commonwealth were of two distinct types-those still designed in the early Renaissance style of the Elizabethan and Jacobean periods, and those that sprang from the genius of Inigo Jones or his followers. It is somewhat difficult at the outset to realize that such buildings as Hatfield House and Whitehall Palace were built within ten years of each other, of such a different conception was the work of Jones to that of any other contemporary building. From the beginning, he broke right away from the jumbled and loose ideas that characterized the work being produced when he commenced his task of raising English architecture from the decline into which it was falling during the reign of James I.

ENGLISH. CIRCA 1610 - The Later Jacobean Period

Source

Want To Further Explore Jacobean Furniture

Visit Old And Sold Antique Digest

Please take time to visit this wonderful link. Old And Sold Antique Digest literally has thousands of articles, not only on pottery, and identifying pottery marks, but they have a wonderful reference article, on just about any and every kind of antique you can think of. For all, you antique lovers, make this one a Favorite ... www.oldandsold.com

Guestbook Comments

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment

    • Bohemians profile image

      Bohemian 

      9 months ago from Pennsylvania USA

      Beautiful photos! finding the antique pieces in good condition is always a struggle.

    • JeffGilbert profile image

      JeffGilbert 

      5 years ago

      Very well researched and educational. Great lens!!

    • profile image

      KarenCookieJar 

      7 years ago

      I love old furniture.

    working

    This website uses cookies

    As a user in the EEA, your approval is needed on a few things. To provide a better website experience, hubpages.com uses cookies (and other similar technologies) and may collect, process, and share personal data. Please choose which areas of our service you consent to our doing so.

    For more information on managing or withdrawing consents and how we handle data, visit our Privacy Policy at: https://hubpages.com/privacy-policy#gdpr

    Show Details
    Necessary
    HubPages Device IDThis is used to identify particular browsers or devices when the access the service, and is used for security reasons.
    LoginThis is necessary to sign in to the HubPages Service.
    Google RecaptchaThis is used to prevent bots and spam. (Privacy Policy)
    AkismetThis is used to detect comment spam. (Privacy Policy)
    HubPages Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide data on traffic to our website, all personally identifyable data is anonymized. (Privacy Policy)
    HubPages Traffic PixelThis is used to collect data on traffic to articles and other pages on our site. Unless you are signed in to a HubPages account, all personally identifiable information is anonymized.
    Amazon Web ServicesThis is a cloud services platform that we used to host our service. (Privacy Policy)
    CloudflareThis is a cloud CDN service that we use to efficiently deliver files required for our service to operate such as javascript, cascading style sheets, images, and videos. (Privacy Policy)
    Google Hosted LibrariesJavascript software libraries such as jQuery are loaded at endpoints on the googleapis.com or gstatic.com domains, for performance and efficiency reasons. (Privacy Policy)
    Features
    Google Custom SearchThis is feature allows you to search the site. (Privacy Policy)
    Google MapsSome articles have Google Maps embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    Google ChartsThis is used to display charts and graphs on articles and the author center. (Privacy Policy)
    Google AdSense Host APIThis service allows you to sign up for or associate a Google AdSense account with HubPages, so that you can earn money from ads on your articles. No data is shared unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    Google YouTubeSome articles have YouTube videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    VimeoSome articles have Vimeo videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    PaypalThis is used for a registered author who enrolls in the HubPages Earnings program and requests to be paid via PayPal. No data is shared with Paypal unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    Facebook LoginYou can use this to streamline signing up for, or signing in to your Hubpages account. No data is shared with Facebook unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    MavenThis supports the Maven widget and search functionality. (Privacy Policy)
    Marketing
    Google AdSenseThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Google DoubleClickGoogle provides ad serving technology and runs an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Index ExchangeThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    SovrnThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Facebook AdsThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Amazon Unified Ad MarketplaceThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    AppNexusThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    OpenxThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Rubicon ProjectThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    TripleLiftThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Say MediaWe partner with Say Media to deliver ad campaigns on our sites. (Privacy Policy)
    Remarketing PixelsWe may use remarketing pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to advertise the HubPages Service to people that have visited our sites.
    Conversion Tracking PixelsWe may use conversion tracking pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to identify when an advertisement has successfully resulted in the desired action, such as signing up for the HubPages Service or publishing an article on the HubPages Service.
    Statistics
    Author Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide traffic data and reports to the authors of articles on the HubPages Service. (Privacy Policy)
    ComscoreComScore is a media measurement and analytics company providing marketing data and analytics to enterprises, media and advertising agencies, and publishers. Non-consent will result in ComScore only processing obfuscated personal data. (Privacy Policy)
    Amazon Tracking PixelSome articles display amazon products as part of the Amazon Affiliate program, this pixel provides traffic statistics for those products (Privacy Policy)