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Mandrake, the Witches' Herb

Updated on February 3, 2018
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Snakesmum was brought up by an avid gardener, and has always had an interest in plants and growing vegetables. She also has pet snakes.

Mandrake, aka Mandragora officinarum

Here I've gathered information about the mandrake plant, including medicinal uses, legends, and how to grow it.

So far, I've successfully raised four mandrake plants from seed, and will soon be planting my home-grown seeds!

(Update) So far, I haven't been able to raise any seedlings, but I've only had seed pods twice. Maybe next year.

The mandrake comes from the Mediterranean area, and is quite common in the Middle East. It is also found in North Africa.

It is often found on stony and uncultivated ground, which is often of poor quality. Mandrake prefers well drained and sandy soil, and it may not tolerate too much frost.

Mandrake In Flower

Source

Mandrake's An Unusual Plant

.....Maybe that's why I like it!

The mandrake plants shown in the picture below this capsule were grown from seed by me. There are four plants in the pot, and the tiny purple speck in the centre is the first flower I've ever had on them, and they are four years old.

Seeds are difficult to come by where I live, so I was really happy to find these some years ago. Out of just twenty seeds, there are four survivors, which is a 20% rate. That's not too bad. Of course, I'm hoping for more flowers next year, and maybe this time, they'll be pollinated.

There are many legends about Mandrake, and, if you've seen the Harry Potter films, then you'll have seen the plant being grown in the school, and screaming when uprooted.

It's said that if you hear the scream from a Mandrake being pulled up, then you'll die, so don't pull them out of the ground. :-)

The Mandrake Are Flowering!

Mandrake In Flower
Mandrake In Flower

Mandrake Trivia

Mandrake's ruling planet is Mercury, and Earth is sometimes mentioned in association with it.

It is sacred to Hecate, and is also associated with Diana, Hathor, Aphrodite, Circe, and the Alrauna Maiden (A legendary sorceress). I've also seen it mentioned with Saturn as a ruling deity.

If you can't get the real mandrake, Mandragora officianalis, then the Americal herb mayapple, Podophyllum peltaltum, can be used as a substitute. It is not related to the real mandrake.

Here is a list of folk names also used to describe mandrake. Some of these are names for the Americal mandrake.

  • Alraun, Anthropomorphon,
  • Baaras, Brain Thief,
  • Circeium, Circoea,
  • Galgenmannchen, Gallows,
  • Herb of Circe, Haxenmannchen,
  • Ladykins,
  • Mandragen, Mandragor, Mannikin,
  • Racoon Berry,
  • Satan's Apple,
  • Semihomo,
  • Sorcerer's Root,
  • Wild Lemon,
  • Womandrake,
  • Witches' Mannikin

The First Mandrake Plant For The Year

This is the first of my four mandrake plants to show itself above ground this year; the other three are holding back. It looks such a tiny plant in that huge pot, doesn't it?

I'd love it if they all came up at once, as two of them flowered last year, and if they were all in flower at the same time, perhaps I'd get some seeds from them. Maybe this year............

A Week Later

Just checked on the mandrake pot, and all four plants are up and doing well. Even better, two of them are already showing flower buds. Since this is at the same time, perhaps this year I'll be able to collect some seeds.

The plants look really healthy, and are growing strongly, so I must be doing something right. :-)

It's been a long wait for flowering size, about 4 or 5 years, but perhaps it has something to do with the climate, since originally these plants came from the Mediterranean area. Maybe that's why they're out of time with our seasons here in Australia - who knows, but I'd love to get some seeds from them.


A Djinn
A Djinn | Source

Djinn's Eggs

Another name for mandrake, in Arabic is "djinn's eggs" - beid el-jinn.

A djinn. or jinn, is a supernatural creature, which like humans, is capable of being good, evil, or neutral. Sometimes they are though of as demons.

Like humanity, jinn have supposedly been given free will. They occupy a parallel world to us, and may sometimes be seen by humans, and may occasionally interact with them.

Hitler & Hanussen

Source

Mandrake Root And Adolf Hitler

Thanks to one of my readers for this post - I hadn't found this particular piece of mandrake trivia.

I wonder if Mandrake root did bring the Third Reich into being?

Hitler was apparently losing his grip on his followers in the late 1930s, and was somewhat depressed. He met an astrologer/magician named Erik Jan Hanussen in Berlin (Hanussen was actually a Jew, who's family name was Steinschneider).

Much taken with Hanussen, Hitler had his horoscope charted by him, and became more interested in the occult.

Hanussen taught Hitler about the use of the mandrake root in spells, and also improved his speech, and body language, so that his public image was improved.

Of course, the fact that Hitler believed in all this gave him credibility when he was speaking, so in that way, one could say that mandrake root, and the spells cast using it, actually did help bring him into power.

To find out more, do a search using the terms "Hitler" and "Mandrake Root" - you'll get a lot of information!

Medieval Drawing Of Mandrake

Public Domain, as the copyright has expired.
Public Domain, as the copyright has expired. | Source

Spellwork With Mandrake Root

Mandrake Root is said to attract wealth, by drawing money towards you. It can also be used to increase agility, strength, and cunning, all very useful attributes.

On the other hand, there are also mentions online that mandrake can be used for mass curses,explosions, and meteor swarms, among other things.

It can also be used to make food for your pets, and to perform telekinesis, but I'm certainly not going to give any to my animals!

With all of this going for it, isn't it surprising that mandrake isn't better known? :-)

Mandragora autumnalis

Source

More Uses For Mandrake

.......don't try these at home!

Mandrake is a member of the nightshade family, and most members of that family are poisonous. Even our potatoes and tomatoes can be dangerous, as they are also part of the Solanaceae. The picture is potato flowers.

By the way, I always refer to the Mediterraneum mandrake, Mandragora officianalis as mandrake root, not the US version, which is may apple.

I've been having a browse around to find more information about mandrake root, and came up with a couple of interesting tidbits.

Did you know that in the ancient world, mandrake was recommended as an aphrodisiac? Not sure just how they used it, becaue you wouldn't want to ingest it! Anyway, it's mentioned in the bible: the reference I found is Genesis 30 : 14-17

The Romans believed that a demon resided in the mandrake root, and if you pulled up the plant, the scream from the demon would kill you.

In the Middle Ages, mandrake root was a popular anaesthetic. Wonder if the patients recovered?

Finally, A Mandrake Seedpod!

It's been over a year since the mandrake flowered, and I didn't think that this year any seed pods would be forthcoming. Imagine my surprise then, when I moved a dying leaf aside, and found a large green seedpod. I'm really happy about that, and will be watching it very closely to monitor its ripening.

Later: Although I waited until the seed pod ripened, and put it away for safekeeping, it has become lost in the disaster area that is part of my storage system.

Another Mandrake Tidbit

Lucius Apuleius, an ancient philosopher and student of Plato, best known for "The Golden Ass", had this to say about Mandrake:

'For witlessness, that is devil sickness or demoniacal possession, take from the body of this said wort Mandrake by the weight of three pennies, administer to drink in warm water as he may find most convenient - soon he will be healed.'

I wouldn't recommend that you try it!

Mandragora

Ancient and Magical Uses

Mandrake belongs to the element of Fire, and is ruled by the Planet Mercury.

Its powers are : Fertility, Health, Love, Money, and Protection

Mandrake has been used as an aphrodisiac, and as an anaesthetic, especially in the Middle Ages.

It seems that mandrake has hypnotic qualities, so in the past, it was used as the original 'date-rape' drug! Other herbals mention it as being a protection against rape.

Time For The Mandrake To Die Down

The four mandrake plants in a pot are looking very sad and sorry for themselves right now. The leaves are drooping and broken, and there are insect bites in them. (See the photo above)

They come up in our Autumn, and die down in Spring, so they're sort of back to front for our climate. Must be because they're really a Northern Hemisphere plant and they haven't learned any different! :-)

Hopefully, they'll come up again next year.....

Culpeper's Herbal

Photo by Snakesmum
Photo by Snakesmum

The Mandrake, According To Nicholas Culpeper

Here are some snippets of information about the mandrake from my copy of "Culpeper's Complete Herbal & English Physician", published in 1826.

......The green leaves, bruised with axungia and barley-meal, heal all hot swellings and inflamations.

......Infused in wine, and drank, it causeth sleep, and easeth pains; the apples smelt to, or the juice taken in a small quantity, also cause sleep.

......The seed and fruit do cleanse the womb.

......It heals vehement pains of the head, and the tooth-ache, when applied to the cheeks and jaws, and causeth sleep.

Medicinal Uses For Mandrake

In ancient times, Mandrake was used as an anaesthetic - the patient chewed on a piece of root before being operated on.

It was also used for purging, and as an emetic.

Sometimes it was uses as a sedative for the insane.

Herbally, Mandrake is still used, but can be toxic, so mostly it is used for salves. It is claimed to be useful against hydrophobia and epilepsy.

Warning : If you have any Mandrake, do not ingest it, as it is toxic if not used properly.

Source

Magical Uses

Use at your peril!

In the Middle Ages, mandrake became more popular in magic, and was used as a magical talisman.

It was thought to protect people against demons, and it was also used for exorcisms.

If you could find a root which was shaped like a mannikin, and placed it on your mantelpiece, it will bring you wealth and happiness.

Mandrake was also used for fertility, was thought to improve the strength of any spell.

Your Comments About Mandrake

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    • Snakesmum profile image
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      Jean DAndrea 3 years ago from Victoria, Australia

      Haven't heard that one Nell, but it would be an interesting note to add to the hub. Shall have to do some research! Thanks for visiting.

    • Nell Rose profile image

      Nell Rose 3 years ago from England

      Hi, fascinating look at the Mandrake, if I remember right, I read somewhere that Jesus was given some mandrake to help him on the cross? not sure, but it was some sort of pain killing plant that slowed down his body functions, I will have to go look it up now! lol! good luck with the growing!

    • Snakesmum profile image
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      Jean DAndrea 3 years ago from Victoria, Australia

      Ah yes, but the Harry Potter mandrake isn't the real thing! :-) I've never pulled one of my plants up to see what the root looks like.

    • peachpurple profile image

      peachy 3 years ago from Home Sweet Home

      oh so that is mandrake, doesn't look like in harry potter film

    • Snakesmum profile image
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      Jean DAndrea 4 years ago from Victoria, Australia

      @rking96: I think it's the way it grows sometimes, when the root looks like a mannekin! :-)

    • rking96 profile image

      Rick King 4 years ago from Charleston, SC

      Interesting lens. What is it about mandrake that makes it so mysterious? Is it the poison factor?

    • Flora Crew profile image

      Flora Crew 4 years ago from Evanston, Illinois

      I was a Jon Donne fan in my youth and fascinated by the "and get with child a mandrake root" quote.

    • Snakesmum profile image
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      Jean DAndrea 4 years ago from Victoria, Australia

      @PadmashriSriram: Fortunately, I've never pulled one out of the ground, and they haven't screamed at me yet! :-) Thanks for visiting.

    • PadmashriSriram profile image

      PadmashriSriram 4 years ago

      A beautifully written lens. I remember reading about Mandrakes in Harry Potter books.

    • somergreat48 profile image

      somergreat48 4 years ago

      This was a pleasure to read very interesting! I want to grow one!

    • alyellow lm profile image

      alyellow lm 4 years ago

      Great information, I learnt new things now.

    • profile image

      tonyleather 4 years ago

      Fascinating lens about this mystical plant!

    • smine27 profile image

      Shinichi Mine 4 years ago from Tokyo, Japan

      Very interesting. I love learning new things so thanks!

    • Meganhere profile image

      Meganhere 4 years ago

      Fascinating lens. Thanks, I really enjoyed it.

    • socialcx1 profile image

      socialcx1 4 years ago

      Great lens. This is all news to me but found it quite fascinating. Many thanks

    • MissRubyStars profile image

      MissRubyStars 4 years ago

      Fascinating information. I had never heard of Mandrake before. Thanks for sharing!

    • DSBVols17 profile image

      DSBVols17 4 years ago

      great lens never seen a mandrake until now thank you for sharing

    • profile image

      ArtbyMAR 4 years ago

      I only thought the Mandrake existed in Harry Potter! Very interesting and enjoyed reading about the history of this herb.

    • Snakesmum profile image
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      Jean DAndrea 4 years ago from Victoria, Australia

      @anonymous: It's native to the Middle East, but you may be able to find a supplier on Google in SA. Good luck!

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      I found this topic so interesting. It is a herb I have never heard of before! Wonder where I can get my hands on some here in South Africa?

    • bornot2b1 profile image

      bornot2b1 4 years ago

      Might have got a few in our garden, & tried our best to kill it.

    • Snakesmum profile image
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      Jean DAndrea 4 years ago from Victoria, Australia

      @Lady Lorelei: Couldn't say, as I haven't seen Little Shop of Horrors. It was in Harry Potter, of course. :-)

    • Lady Lorelei profile image

      Lorelei Cohen 4 years ago from Canada

      The pod head of the mandrake plant looks like the plant from Little Shop of Horrors. I wonder if this is what they modeled their movie plant on.

    • Cynthia Haltom profile image

      Cynthia Haltom 4 years ago from Diamondhead

      Very interesting I learned a lot about Mandrake, since I knew nothing before I started reading.

    • MelanieKaren profile image

      Melanie Wilcox 4 years ago from Pennsylvania, USA

      Hi :) There's a great animation of mandrake in the movie PAN. Mandrake is soaked in milk to feed it and placed under the bed. It's worth watching. The whole movie is great, and I think you would appreciate it. A mandrake root is depicting as a human baby, and it is quite adorable.

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      Thought I would stop by again. This is so interesting how Mandrake has been used.

      Thank you for visiting. :)

    • JimMcD profile image

      JimMcD 4 years ago

      Interesting lens...thanks

      More for external uses than internal from the sounds of it.

    • mrdata profile image

      mrdata 4 years ago

      Valuable information about Mandrake! Thanks!

    • adragast24 profile image

      adragast24 4 years ago

      Interesting, had never heard about it either. Thanks for this informative article!

    • Hairdresser007 profile image

      James Jordan 4 years ago from Burbank, CA

      Never heard of it and I love aromatherapy and all that. Great lens with lots of great info!

    • profile image

      lionmom100 4 years ago

      What a cool lens.

    • PhilVardy profile image

      PhilVardy 4 years ago

      Cool lens! Traditional knowledge of plants and animals is so under-utilized. Thanks for sharing :)

    • Redneck Lady Luck profile image

      Lorelei Cohen 5 years ago from Canada

      Yikes, I think that the Mandrake plant will not be making an appearance in my yard. I enjoy mystical magical stuff but generally like it to be of the lighthearted variety. The mandrake plant really does have some spooky stuff in it's past history lol. Fantastic facts on this plant.

    • TaraWojt profile image

      Tara Wojtaszek 5 years ago

      Very interesting tidbits about Mandrake. I just love the mandrake designs from CafePress, very cool indeed.

    • profile image

      anonymous 5 years ago

      I visit the plants and have a chat with them on occasion. :-)

    • Snakesmum profile image
      Author

      Jean DAndrea 5 years ago from Victoria, Australia

      @CoolFool83: Thankyou! It's an interesting little plant, for sure.

    • CoolFool83 profile image

      CoolFool83 5 years ago

      Really awesome lense on mandrake.

    • Snakesmum profile image
      Author

      Jean DAndrea 5 years ago from Victoria, Australia

      @sybil watson: They are interesting little plants, aren't they? Thanks for visiting.

    • profile image

      sybil watson 5 years ago

      When I saw your title I just had to read this - it reminded me of the mandrakes from Harry Potter. Their long history is so fascinating.

    • Snakesmum profile image
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      Jean DAndrea 5 years ago from Victoria, Australia

      @ItayaLightbourne: It isn't easy because of the low germination rate. I'm hoping to get some more seeds this year, but it depends on pollination, of course. Thanks for visiting.

    • ItayaLightbourne profile image

      Itaya Lightbourne 5 years ago from Topeka, KS

      Fascinating info about mandrake. I didn't realize it was so difficult to grow. Hope you get some seeds from your plants soon! :)

    • Snakesmum profile image
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      Jean DAndrea 5 years ago from Victoria, Australia

      @squidoopets: Thanks for visiting!

    • squidoopets profile image

      Darcie French 5 years ago from Abbotsford, BC

      Very interesting info about the mandrake

    • ismeedee profile image

      ismeedee 5 years ago

      So fascinating! I didn't know anything about Mandrake before! Squid angel blessed! And Happy Valentine's Day!

    • Snakesmum profile image
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      Jean DAndrea 5 years ago from Victoria, Australia

      @David Stone1: Glad you found it, then. It's a fascinating herb. Thanks for visiting and the blessing.

    • David Stone1 profile image

      David Stone 5 years ago from New York City

      Interesting. Totally new subject for me.

    • Snakesmum profile image
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      Jean DAndrea 5 years ago from Victoria, Australia

      @VspaBotanicals: Thankyou, and thanks for visiting.

    • VspaBotanicals profile image

      VspaBotanicals 5 years ago

      Oh yes, I know about the history of this herb. Wonderful lens.

    • Snakesmum profile image
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      Jean DAndrea 5 years ago from Victoria, Australia

      @CampingmanNW: Yes, I was surprised too! Thanks for visiting.

    • CampingmanNW profile image

      CampingmanNW 5 years ago

      The mandrake and Hitler....who would have thought?

    • Snakesmum profile image
      Author

      Jean DAndrea 5 years ago from Victoria, Australia

      @LadyDuck: Thankyou! It is a very interesting plant. Glad you enjoyed your visit

    • profile image

      LadyDuck 5 years ago

      In Europe we still refer to Mandragora as a mysterious plant. I really enjoyed reading your lens.

    • Snakesmum profile image
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      Jean DAndrea 5 years ago from Victoria, Australia

      @aesta1: Glad you found it useful. Thanks for your visit.

    • Snakesmum profile image
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      Jean DAndrea 5 years ago from Victoria, Australia

      @BodyLanguageExp: It's has a great deal of myth and legend about it! Thanks for visiting

    • BodyLanguageExp profile image

      BodyLanguageExp 5 years ago

      Fascinating information on the Mandrake. I had no idea it holds so much history! Thank you for this lens.

    • aesta1 profile image

      Mary Norton 5 years ago from Ontario, Canada

      This is useful information. This is new to me.

    • Snakesmum profile image
      Author

      Jean DAndrea 5 years ago from Victoria, Australia

      @WriterJanis2: Thankyou Janis. Glad it was interesting for you. :-)

    • WriterJanis2 profile image

      WriterJanis2 5 years ago

      This is such a great lens. I'll be passing it on to my son.

    • Snakesmum profile image
      Author

      Jean DAndrea 5 years ago from Victoria, Australia

      @myspace9: Thanks for visiting! Have a great 2013

    • profile image

      myspace9 5 years ago

      Thanks for squidliking one of my lenses. Happy new year.

    • Snakesmum profile image
      Author

      Jean DAndrea 5 years ago from Victoria, Australia

      @KimGiancaterino: Thanks for visiting and your Blessing! :-)

    • KimGiancaterino profile image

      KimGiancaterino 5 years ago

      I enjoyed learning more about the Mandrake plant.

    • Snakesmum profile image
      Author

      Jean DAndrea 5 years ago from Victoria, Australia

      @norma-holt: Thankyou for the comments and your blessing. The mandrake plants are currently underground hiding from the heat. :-)

    • Snakesmum profile image
      Author

      Jean DAndrea 5 years ago from Victoria, Australia

      @LynetteBell: I agree with you about chewing before operations! Better today. :-)

    • LynetteBell profile image

      LynetteBell 5 years ago from Christchurch, New Zealand

      I'm glad we don't have to chew on it these days before an operation! Hadn't heard of the plant before.

    • norma-holt profile image

      norma-holt 5 years ago

      This is a beautiful lens, well researched and interesting. As I am in the ACT I know what you mean about the seasons. You have done well to have these plants survive and propogate. Blessed.

    • Snakesmum profile image
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      Jean DAndrea 5 years ago from Victoria, Australia

      @anonymous: Thanks for visiting!

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      anonymous 5 years ago

      This is great, thank you for your sharing, I really like them. :)

    • Snakesmum profile image
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      Jean DAndrea 5 years ago from Victoria, Australia

      @anonymous: Whatever works for you is fine!

    • profile image

      anonymous 5 years ago

      @anonymous: Rebuke evil spirits in Jesus name! I've seen two and because I am a Christian it worked for me.

    • Snakesmum profile image
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      Jean DAndrea 5 years ago from Victoria, Australia

      @CoolKarma: Thanks for visiting, and I'm sure there is info about mandrake that I haven't found yet! :-)

    • CoolKarma profile image

      CoolKarma 5 years ago

      I had no idea mandrake was such an interesting plant. Great info, thank you.

    • Snakesmum profile image
      Author

      Jean DAndrea 5 years ago from Victoria, Australia

      @SteveKaye: Yes, it's amazing just what you can find out about any subject on the internet! Thanks for your Blessing and visit, Steve.

    • profile image

      SteveKaye 5 years ago

      I found this info fascinating.

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      anonymous 5 years ago

      Hi there, I just read about the mandrake roots medicinal properties and noticed on here that you had mentioned it was an aphrodisiac. I found out that no matter which way you use this plant on yourself your pupils will dilate. Greeks I think it said used to say women used it as drops in their eyes to make their eyes more appealing.

    • Snakesmum profile image
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      Jean DAndrea 6 years ago from Victoria, Australia

      @anonymous: Plant them as soon as possible, in a sandy soil, preferably in a pot. They don't need to be kept inside, but a variable temperature is best. Keep track of when you planted them, as the seeds may take 12 months, or even two years to germinate. Good luck with your seeds!

    • profile image

      anonymous 6 years ago

      I have four Mandragora officianalis seeds which I ordered from England. I wonder, would you give me some advice on making them sprout? I have read several different growers sites, one mentioned putting them in the fridge for a while. Any advice would be welcome, and thank you.

    • Jadelynx-HP profile image

      Tracey Boyer 6 years ago from Michigan

      I would love to grow some mandrakes, do you know if they can withstand cold winters or if they can be grown inside ? Another thing I was worried about was if they are poisonous, if cats chew on them ? Thanks for the informative lens. :)

    • Snakesmum profile image
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      Jean DAndrea 6 years ago from Victoria, Australia

      @anonymous: Salt or garlic would be easier, in my opinion, and just as effective, but mandrake is fine. In the long run, it's whatever works for you!

    • profile image

      anonymous 6 years ago

      I'm thinking of buying some Mandrake root my friend has grown and I was wanting to wear it around as a demon repellent. Do you think that would be wise, or is there a better way to protect against evil spirits?

    • eep720 lm profile image

      eep720 lm 6 years ago

      Wow very interesting!

    • Snakesmum profile image
      Author

      Jean DAndrea 6 years ago from Victoria, Australia

      @dahlia369: Thankyou for visiting, and thankyou for my "Blessing" :-)

    • dahlia369 profile image

      dahlia369 6 years ago

      Nicely done lens & helpful resource. ***Angel blessed*** :)

    • pheonix76 profile image

      pheonix76 6 years ago from WNY

      This is very interesting! I never knew the mandrake was a real plant (and not just found in the world of Harry Potter). Thanks for the information and good luck with your plants!

    • Snakesmum profile image
      Author

      Jean DAndrea 6 years ago from Victoria, Australia

      @RinchenChodron: I guess it's just to see if I can get the seeds to grow - call it a challenge! :-)

      Thanks for visiting.

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      RinchenChodron 6 years ago

      Hm, interesting. It is famous. Why do you want so many?

    • Snakesmum profile image
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      Jean DAndrea 6 years ago from Victoria, Australia

      @gypsyman27 lm: Thanks for your visit and your comments. Had a good time writing this one! :-)

    • gypsyman27 lm profile image

      gypsyman27 lm 6 years ago

      This was a very informative lens. I learned a great deal about mandrake root that I didn't know. Well done, good lens. See you around the galaxy...

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      anonymous 6 years ago

      I've heard of mandrake before but didn't know anything about it, you covered it very nicely and so well presented!

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      ladydarkness1313 6 years ago

      Great Post!!!

    • Snakesmum profile image
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      Jean DAndrea 7 years ago from Victoria, Australia

      @anonymous: Glad you liked the lens, Grace. Thanks for visiting

      Jean

    • Snakesmum profile image
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      Jean DAndrea 7 years ago from Victoria, Australia

      Glad you liked the lens, Grace. Thanks for visiting

      Jean

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      anonymous 7 years ago

      Thanks for this lens. I've always wanted to learn more about Mandrake but this is the first time I've found good info

    • Snakesmum profile image
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      Jean DAndrea 7 years ago from Victoria, Australia

      @anonymous: Hi Sophia,

      Hope the plant recovers - they're pretty hardy.

      I'm currently drying a seedpod from mine, and will hopefully get some new plants in the future! :-)

      Cheers

      Jean

    • profile image

      anonymous 7 years ago

      @anonymous: Hi Alex, Patience seems to be the key in growing mandrake. I'm germinating some mandrake seeds at the moment. Hopefully they will grow into healthy plants! Best, Sophia.

    • profile image

      anonymous 7 years ago

      @Snakesmum: Thanks Jean for your comment. Will make sure the roots are well covered. Hopefully the leaves will grow back next year! Best, Sophia.

    • Snakesmum profile image
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      Jean DAndrea 7 years ago from Victoria, Australia

      @anonymous: You're right, Alex, roots showing equals problems.

      Perhaps it was the wrong time to repot it...... I'm no expert though.

    • profile image

      anonymous 7 years ago

      Hi

      I am with you on this one Jean .Get the root covered up Sophia.The plant is dormant or thinking about throwing the towel in but almost always if the root shows above ground there is a problem below ground

      Regards

      Alex

    • Snakesmum profile image
      Author

      Jean DAndrea 7 years ago from Victoria, Australia

      @anonymous: Hi Sophia,

      First of all, I wouldn't have any of the roots exposed - none of my plants do that.

      Your plant could be dormant, as they do die down over winter. The best thing to

      do is to cover the root with soil, and leave it be, just keeping the soil damp as usual,

      and see if it comes up again next year.

      Good luck

      Jean

    • profile image

      anonymous 7 years ago

      Hi, I have a mandrake plant that has recently been repotted during the hot summer months. The plant has lost all its leaves and the exposed portion of the root appears shrivelled up as a result. How do I find out if the plant is still alive? is being dormant? How do I know if it is still alive? Much thanks.

    working