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Remarkable, Unusual, and Somewhat Bizarre Flowers

Updated on May 28, 2012

You may look weird, but you're still pretty!

Have you ever seen a picture of a strange looking flower, or perhaps came across one in your travels, and thought, what the heck is that! I have, and this is a compilation of pictures and information on some of those beautifully bizarre flowers.

Passion Flower

Passion Flower
Passion Flower

Genus: Passiflora, Family: Passifloraceae

The Passion Flower is also known as the Clock Flower because of the dark clock like "hands" in the center of the flower. There are about 500 different species of the Passiflora, with most of them having a unique structure like the one shown above.

The Passion Flower is rather difficult to pollinate and requires a rather large bee to transfer the pollen. Some of the less unusual flowers of the Passiflora family are easier to pollinate and this can be done by smaller bees, hummingbirds, and even bats. Some species of the Passion Flower are even self-pollenating.

Species of the Passiflora is found all over the world, except Antarctica. Though not originally native to Europe, species of the Passiflora can now be found growing wild there.

One species of the Passiflora, the Passiflora Edulis, is actually the flowering Passion Fruit.

Some species of Passiflora is cold tolerant whose roots can withstand temperatures as low as -20° C.

The name of the Passion Flower is not a reference to love, but to the "Passion of the Christ".

Fly Orchid

Fly Orchid
Fly Orchid

Genus: Ophrys, Family: Orchidaceae

This species of the Orchid Family is unique in that it resembles a fly for the purpose of pollination. Not only does it look like a large fly, but it releases an odor similar to the pheromones of the female fly to entice the male fly. The male fly lands and eventually figures out this is not a female fly and leaves, covered in the Orchid's pollen.

The Fly Orchid is native to Southern England and Northern Wales, with a very few spots in Ireland.

Another insect Orchid is the Bee Orchid, which belongs to the same family as the Fly Orchid, and looks like a bee for the same reason. The native areas of these two species of Orchids overlap in certain parts of England, and hybridization of the two Orchids is common here.

Like Vanilla? The Vanilla planifolia plant is an Orchid.

Mimosa Pudica

Mimosa Pudica
Mimosa Pudica

Genus: Mimosa, Family: Fabacae

The Mimosa is native to South and Central America, but is found in many other places in the world. The Mimosa has many nicknames like the Touch-Me-Not, the Tickle Me Plant, and the Sensitive Plant (Pudica means shy). When the leaves of this flower are touched, they fold inward and droop, only to return back to its untouched state within minutes. The Mimosa leaves also fold inward in the evenings and reopen at daybreak.

Aasblume

Aasblume
Aasblume

Genus: Stapelia, Family: Apocynaceae

The Aasblume is a member of the Apocynaceae family which can grow to 16 inches in diameter. Members of the Apocynaceae family are also called Carrion Flowers because of their scent. They smell like rotting meat to attract blow flies for pollination.

The Huernia Flower is also a member of the Apocynaceae family and share the same scent characteristics. The Huernia Flower is typically vividly striped and has a funnel shape. The Apocynaceae flowers are native to Africa, where carrion is common.

The Christmas Rose

The Christmas Rose
The Christmas Rose

Genus: Helleborus, Family: Ranunculaceae

Commonly called the Lenton Rose or Christmas Rose, these flowers are not a member of the Rose family. It got the name Christmas Rose because these flowers are extremely hardy, and some species bloom in winter. There is also an old legend that the Hellebore sprouted in the snow from the tears of a young girl who had no gift to give the Christ child in Bethlehem.

Some species of the Hellebores flowers are green, like the Corsican Hellebore shown here. Many Hellebore Flowers are extremely toxic and were used in ancient times to ward off evil. Some historians believe Alexander the Great died form a Hellebore overdose.

The Hellebore is native to Europe and can be found in concentration in the Balkans.

Thanks to KaCey97007 for the large picture above.

Doctor Prakob

Doctor Prakob
Doctor Prakob

Genus:Dendrobium, Family:Orchidaceae

The Dendrobium is a genus of the orchid with over 1200 species. This particular species are found either growing on trees or growing over rocks. Some species of the Dendrobium are only tropical, while others are cold tolerant and can be found in the Himalayan Mountains. Some of the Dendrobium species are highly coveted, and there are many hybrids of the Dendrobium.

Plumeria

Plumeria
Plumeria

Genus:Plumeria, Family:Apocynaceae

Plumeria, also called the Frangipani, is native to the tropical and sub-tropical areas of the Americas, but they have spread to many regions of the world. They are so common in Hawaii, that some think the Plumeria originated there. Related to the Oleander, the Plumeria excretes a poisonous sap.

There are distinct differences to the various species of the Plumeria, with these differences reflected in habitat, color and shape.

Plumeria are most fragrant at night, and do not produce nectar. Because of the fragrant smell, moths are tricked into searching the flowers for nectar, and fly from flower to flower in their futile search, thus pollinating the Plumeria.

Thanks to mad plumerian for the large picture above.

Living Stone

Living Stone
Living Stone

Genus: Lithops, Family: Aizoaceae

The Lithops, same name for the plural and singular flower, are given the nick name living stones or pebble plants because of how they seem to flower out of stones. Native to southern Africa, the name Lithops is Greek for Stone-like. These flowers do not have the typical green stem with green leaves, but seem to spring right out of stone. These plants have either yellow or white flowers, and the leaves are a mottled grey or brown. This camouflages the young flower and protects them from being eaten. There are many different species of the Lithops flower, and the variety depends on the type of rock in the area. The Lithops need well drained soil with very little rainfall to thrive, and some species can survive on only dew formation.

Thanks to Ahmiguel for the large Living Stone photo above.

Have your Flowers and Eat them too!

Wilton Flowers and Cake Design Lesson Plan Course 2- Discontinued By Manufacturer
Wilton Flowers and Cake Design Lesson Plan Course 2- Discontinued By Manufacturer

Do these flowers inspire you?

Learn how to make your own flowers and then eat them!

 

Have you seen these?

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    • DDE profile image

      Devika Primić 21 months ago from Dubrovnik, Croatia

      Interesting about these flowers. I have the Passion flower and it did grow wildly too.

    • profile image

      Brandon 2 years ago

      Hi! I am new to your site from the blog hop! I love your pictures so cute We just got back from WDW and I rellay enjoyed all the flowers and topiaries from the Flower and Garden Festival it's magical. Although I am totally jealous of that view in Hawaii

    • profile image

      anonymous 5 years ago

      I like these really exotic & Unusual Living Stone Flowers . These are pretty! too...

    • Kailua-KonaGirl profile image

      June Parker 5 years ago from New York

      Beautiful photos! Did you take them? Coming from Hawaii, I am familiar with several of the species you have featured here. Nice job!

    • KateHonebrink profile image

      KateHonebrink 5 years ago

      The only flower in your article that I have ever heard of is the frangipani, mostly because I read about it in some book at some time and thought the name sounded cool. This is a wonderful lens, so I'm 'watering' it with a SquidLike in response to a quest, but also because it's just plain great!

    • sherridan profile image

      sherridan 5 years ago

      What incredible flowers! Another great lens.

    • profile image

      anonymous 5 years ago

      I like this lense.

    • Pam Irie profile image

      Pam Irie 5 years ago from Land of Aloha

      We have a plumeria tree in our backyard. The aasblume flower is really exotic looking!

    • profile image

      anonymous 5 years ago

      beautiful lens.

    • profile image

      anonymous 5 years ago

      In the eye of the beholder it is say to be like most people and things Beauty is in the eye of a lot of things even if you don't see it.

    • profile image

      moonlitta 6 years ago

      Joy to eyes, your flowers are extremely beautiful and extraordinary in their appearance. I never knew about any of them till now, so thanks for bringing them around!

    • TolovajWordsmith profile image

      Tolovaj Publishing House 6 years ago from Ljubljana

      Amazing photos. On every walk I am reminded by kids how poor is my knowledge about flowers... Thanks for your lens!

    • christopherlee lm profile image

      christopherlee lm 6 years ago

      You have one of the most creative len , I have seen so far, very good work.

    • profile image

      anonymous 6 years ago

      They are all unique and beautiful flowers.

    • profile image

      BeyondRoses 6 years ago

      All the flowers are each lovely in their own way. Love the Mimosa Pudica, and Living Stone ... the Fly Orchid is adorable!

    • profile image

      Zephyr2651 6 years ago

      very well done!

    • ElizabethJeanAl profile image

      ElizabethJeanAl 6 years ago

      Beautiful flowers!

    • Sylvestermouse profile image

      Cynthia Sylvestermouse 6 years ago from United States

      Wow! These flowers are really beautiful and unusual. Awesome!

    • profile image

      anonymous 6 years ago

      awesome

    • profile image

      Mugsie 8 years ago

      What a wonderful lens! Beautiful pictures and great unusual plants. Loved it!

    • profile image

      anonymous 8 years ago

      Absolutely beautiful! I kept going back and forth for another look--great information as well. I gave my sister-in-law a Helleborus, the green flowers were amazing. You display beauty well.

    • ClassyGals profile image

      Cynthia Davis 8 years ago from Pittsburgh

      Beautifully done. Five stars!

    • profile image

      anonymous 8 years ago

      I believe I have seen Plumeria. For some reason I don't take great note of individual flowers, but I like them in general. I like taking a good whiff. This lens is so enjoyable because of Debra's tender outlook.

    • dustytoes profile image

      dustytoes 8 years ago

      This is so beautiful...what lovely photos of many wonderful flowers. I remember seeing a passion flower vine for the first time and how simply amazing it was. 5 stars!

    • profile image

      coopd 8 years ago

      I love flowers! Thank you for joining my Nature Lovers group :)

    • profile image

      julieannbrady 8 years ago

      Holy Moly! This is an amazing lens. I love the Passion Flower and the Fly Orchid. Has Deb the flowergardener seen your lens yet??? You must tell her about it. Lovely and remarkable -- just like you my dear. ;)

    • profile image

      ChristiannaGarrett-Martin 8 years ago

      What a wonderful Lens! Fantasticly unusual flowers. I like your lay-out too :)

      5 stars from me :)

      Christianna