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Three Ways of Growing Potatoes

Updated on April 22, 2018
liesl5858 profile image

There are so many ways of growing potatoes but there are three ways or methods that I have tried. All three ways has been a success for me.

Three ways of Growing or Planting Potatoes

  1. Growing Potatoes direct into the soil – First dig some plots or raised soil-bed then flatten them with grab hoe or spade and make two parallel holes as many as you need.

    Or another way of doing it is to dig two parallel trench and put in the multipurpose compost and organic potato fertiliser(made from chicken manure enrich with natural Potash) or you can use Growmore plant fertiliser instead. Mix the compost and fertiliser with the soil then sit the potato seed with the shoots facing upwards. Then cover it with soil from the sides about 4 inches deep and a foot apart each hole. Make sure the potato shoots are well covered.

    You can put two segments of seed potatoes in one hole. So that if one dies you still got another to grow. Then water it after. If you prefer the trench then just line the seed potatoes with the shoots upwards, about 30cm(12 in) apart and 10 to15cm(4 to 6 in)deep and cover the seed potatoes by pulling the soil on the sides.

  2. Planting on a barrel or container – seed potatoes can be grown in barrels or any containers larger than 12 inches wide(30 cm) and 12 inches deep(30 cm). Make sure the barrel or container has good drainage. Put some gravels or stones at the bottom of the container or barrel to provide drainage. Then top it up with compost mixed with organic potato fertiliser and plant the seed potatoes in it. Make sure you cover the seed potatoes well enough. Then water it after. Position your barrel or container in a sunny position.
  3. Planting potatoes on a large bin bag or grow bag – First of all, turn the bin bag inside out halfway through then make holes for drainage at the bottom of the bin bag. Fill up the bottom with loose soil or gravel about 2 inches high then top it up with a mixture of multipurpose compost and organic potato fertiliser(Grow More) then plant your potatoes and water it.

    Even better when you use your own compost. Make sure you put your grow bag in sunny position. This method is very good if you haven't got much space in your garden or you just want to try growing potatoes. Potatoes are the easiest vegetable you can grow even if you are not a gardener.

Cutting The Potatoes into Segments before Planting

First of all, decide which part of your garden you want to plant your potatoes. Select an area of your garden that is quite sunny and the soil should be loose not hard. Potatoes do well if the soil is good and fertile.

Potatoes are ready to plant when their shoots are about an inch long and have roots shooting out as well. We chit the potatoes and leave it for a few days to dry before planting it. To chit means to cut the sprouting whole seed potatoes into segments to produce more potatoes that's what my father told me when I asked, why?

Obviously, the more segments you have the more it produces potato crops which is good. Another benefit of cutting the potatoes is to remove the part that has not germinated and it will increase your harvest of potatoes.

Taking care of Potatoes after Planting

Once potatoes are planted, they don't need much looking after, all you got to do is water them everyday if it is not raining and weed them if there are weeds. After a month when the potatoes are about 6 to 8 inches tall in height, it is time to put some more soil on top of the plot to increase production of potatoes and protect the new potatoes(crops) from getting burnt by the sun.

Do this only on potatoes planted directly on the soil, ground or plots not on containers or grow bags. At this point, you can also put some more potato fertiliser(growmore fertilizer) if you think that your potatoes can do with more but if not leave it. Bear in mind you already put some slow-release fertilisers with the compost when you planted them.

When your potatoes' leaves turn yellow, that means your potatoes are ready to be harvested. Also the soil cracks when the potatoes are big enough to be harvested.

Some Helpful Tips on what Fertilisers to use on Potatoes

In my country(Philippines), farmers use "chicken manure", Urea and "grow more" fertilisers a lot for most type of vegetables. My father and brothers use them in their gardens.

1. I used First Choice Organic Potato Fertiliser – a carefully balanced slow release fertiliser for sustained growth of potato tubers. This will help increase your harvest. This fertiliser can be bought in Poundland shops or garden centres if you live in England. It is cheap to buy as well. Also suitable for use with potato barrels, grow bags and other planters. Recommended as well for other vegetable crops. This organic fertiliser gives a slow nutrient release. My brothers and my father use dried chicken manure in the Philippines and their vegetable crops are healthy and robust.

Apply Organic Potato Fertiliser at a rate of 140g/sq. m (4oz /sq. yard). This is equivalent for typical pot sizes to:

  • 30 cm (12 in) diameter in pot – 10g
  • 38 cm (15 in) diameter in pot – 15g
  • 50 cm (30 in) diameter in pot – 30g

2. Growmore (multi-purpose plant food) – is a balanced general purpose plant food which provides the equal amounts of the major nutrients required for strong healthy growth. It is suitable for use on most types of flowers and ideal for feeding fruit and vegetables. It is easy to apply to the soil directly around the established plant. I use this a lot on all my vegetables and flowers. Before topping up the soil on the potato plants, I put a few handful of this fertiliser and cover it up with top up soil.

Liquid Plant Food can be used also if you prefer. I do sometimes buy them liquid fertilisers.

Photos of Growing Potatoes

My first harvest of my potatoes below and still growing
My first harvest of my potatoes below and still growing | Source
Here are my potatoes still growing but I started harvesting because I could not wait.
Here are my potatoes still growing but I started harvesting because I could not wait. | Source
How my potatoes look like now
How my potatoes look like now | Source
Potatoes now, nearly ready for harvest
Potatoes now, nearly ready for harvest | Source
Potatoes after it had top up soil added
Potatoes after it had top up soil added | Source
Potatoes are ready for adding top up soil
Potatoes are ready for adding top up soil | Source
Potatoes that had top up soil added
Potatoes that had top up soil added | Source
Potatoes that are cut up into segments before planting.
Potatoes that are cut up into segments before planting. | Source
Discarded potatoes that are no good because they got no shoots.
Discarded potatoes that are no good because they got no shoots. | Source
Whole seed potatoes not cut up with shoots and roots and nearly ready for planting but needs to be cut up in segments
Whole seed potatoes not cut up with shoots and roots and nearly ready for planting but needs to be cut up in segments | Source

Growing Potatoes

Have you ever planted Potatoes?

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Photos of Fertilisers that I used

Organic Potato Fertiliser - I use this fertiliser for my spuds as they are very good
Organic Potato Fertiliser - I use this fertiliser for my spuds as they are very good | Source
Hortus Growmore - multi-purpose plant food
Hortus Growmore - multi-purpose plant food | Source

Three ways of growing potatoes

Seed Potato Mix, 5 lbs. Certified Seed Non GMO Red Pontiacs and German Butterballs
Seed Potato Mix, 5 lbs. Certified Seed Non GMO Red Pontiacs and German Butterballs

I love this type of Pontiac potatoes. My parents and I used to grow them types of potatoes in the Philippines. They grow well and produce plenty of potatoes. I recommend Pontiacs.

 

© 2013 Linda Bryen

Three ways of growing potatoes

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    • liesl5858 profile image
      Author

      Linda Bryen 4 years ago from United Kingdom

      You are welcome Maren Morgan M-T

    • Maren Morgan M-T profile image

      Maren Elizabeth Morgan 4 years ago from Pennsylvania

      Thanks - good tips.

    • liesl5858 profile image
      Author

      Linda Bryen 4 years ago from United Kingdom

      Thank you suzzycue for your kind comment. I hope my garden tips is of help to you and that you will gather lots of potatoes this year.

    • suzzycue profile image

      Susan Britton 4 years ago from Ontario, Canada

      Great hub I am pinning it under my garden tips board. I am growing potatoes this year and these tips are great.

    • liesl5858 profile image
      Author

      Linda Bryen 4 years ago from United Kingdom

      Hi! Stove and Home, thank you for reading my hub about planting potatoes and I am glad if I had helped you in some way. The potato leaves are edible but I haven't tried it myself. Thanks for your kind comment.

    • Stove And Home profile image

      Stove And Home 4 years ago

      This has been very informative. Now I understand that chitting is just cutting the potatoes in half. I thought it was more complicated than that. Do you know if the potato's green leaves are edible?

    • liesl5858 profile image
      Author

      Linda Bryen 4 years ago from United Kingdom

      Thank you sid76 for your kind comment.

    • profile image

      sid76 4 years ago

      Very good idea liesl. Voted up and sharing!

    • liesl5858 profile image
      Author

      Linda Bryen 4 years ago from United Kingdom

      Hello! travmaj, thank you for your lovely comments as always. I thought you were traveling as I have not seen you much on hubpages. Funny enough I just read your hub about Indonesia and it reminded me of home. I can see a hub coming soon about Morocco good for you.

    • travmaj profile image

      travmaj 4 years ago from australia

      Hello - this is very timely for me - we have just started our veggie garden and intend to grow potatoes so I'll bookmark all your instructions. It's so well documented. Thank you. (am travelling at the moment -in Morocco - so don't get chance to hub much)

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