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Content Mills Vs. Revenue Sharing Sites

Updated on September 3, 2014

Grateful To Have an Option

First off, I'm thankful there is a choice here for us writers who want to try to make some money. Both are great ways to hone your skills and learn the ropes of the Internet. Both are valid, viable ways in which a writer with some skill can start to put together some money, and hopefully one day become enough to quit their day job and call it a living.

Personally, I have written for both and still do. When I was in need of some money this last winter, the content mills seemed a far better option than the revenue sharing sites like Hubpages, Squidoo, and the one I was on: Allvoices. I was new to this on-line writing thing, so I didn't think I had the capability to navigate Hubpages and configure stuff.

Obviously I figured some stuff out, and in this hub I'll discuss the pros and cons of content mills and revenue sharing sites.

Source

Content Mills

I am currently a member of two sites, which I have made some money from. Textbroker is one and Hirewriters is another. Textbroker was the one I first started using and I think they're a very professional and good website. Hirewriters is easier to use, is legit, and also a good place to write content as well.

The part I don't like about content writing for a broker site like these and others, is the writing is not yours after you submit it. You get a one time fee of about a penny a word, and then you have sold the exclusive rights to it. Really though, you don't care, because the writing is simply some topic or information about something you wouldn't write about normally. One thing is, by writing these articles, you learn all kinds of stuff. That's one of the negatives though too, is you have to study many topics which is time consuming.

Writing content pays weekly with these two sites, and some pay monthly. They pay you through Paypal usually. Sometimes they want tax information from you as well. You mostly have to be from English speaking counties to work for them. Content mills are a good way to make money and get better as a writer.

Picture I took in Eugene Oregon
Picture I took in Eugene Oregon

Where Do You Write?

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Revenue Sharing Sites

Sites like Hubpages, Squidoo, Wizzley, and others are out there where you can write and get a share of the revenue. They all are a bit different, but the concept is about the same, and you get paid depending on the views and popularity of your article and this income is residual.

Getting a residual income is the part that is the best. The factor to consider with revenue sharing sites is you have to have a mind set of long term compared to the content mill's short term mind set. You won't make much money for the first few months, but after awhile, with prolific writing and crafty affiliate placements, you can have the potential of making much more than from a content mill.

I guess it depends on the type of person too. Personally I never run out of ideas to write about, I just have too many and then don't write on any of them cause I'm not a good enough writer – and won't do them any justice. Something like this, but I'm working through this and beginning to write more and be more accepting of my flaws. Some people don't have ideas of their own, and getting one is harder for them then writing a content piece for some client. Hey, not everyone is the same and this is good.


Harold Dog
Harold Dog | Source

What I Think

To me, writing my own original pieces is not only easier, but much more rewarding than content mills. I love to publish something new and then track it closely to see how it had an impact if any. And it's still around forever for me to index, go back to and edit, to share, or do whatever I want with. The residual income and the original content are the factors that have led me to solely write for revenue sharing sites, which I'm including my blog into, although I share only the income with myself.

Content mills can become a place where people make a decent living, believe it or not. A person who becomes invaluable there at Textbrokers, will be invited to teams, and be a top level 5 writer, getting no less than about 2 cents a word. If that person writes 5,000 words a day, then they have made $100/day. Not bad, and there are even better pay rates than that. So, if a person wants to write and make money, but isn't interested in creating so much, then Content mills are for you.

Revenue sharing sites are for those who want to write original pieces and engage people with what they have to say. They want to create and be an artist. Also, they may simply have the ability to take the long term approach because they have a day job,or another source of income. Revenue sites are stepping stones for the budding e-book writer, for the professional blogger, for the professional Internet marketers.


Numbers Calculations

Let's calculate some numbers and see what we're getting with these two ways, in the terms of money.

- I'm going to use the estimates of getting paid by the view and by the word. For Hubpages let's say we get .04 cents a view, and for content mill one penny a word. So let's say an article consists of a thousand words at both places. So, with content mill we make $10, and with HP let's say we get 10,000 views from that article in a matter of five years. So with HP we make $40, plus let's say we make have an Amazon Associates account and sell a book in that article. Let's say we sell 100 books and get 6% of the profit, the profit is 2,000, so we make $120 ($20 book). So, in a five years time, that one article that took us about the same time and effort as the content article, has made us a total of $160 compared to the $10 we made at the content mill.

Add on to this calculation, that you had back links in your hub to your blog or another revenue sharing site. Let's say then that 1,000 of those 10,000 followed that link, so now you are making money elsewhere as well. See how much more enticing it is to write for a revenue sharing site like Hubpages?

My last thoughts here, I remember when I was writing for Textbroker last winter and it was all I could do to write even 5 smaller articles and make about $20 a day. I know this was partly because I was new to this and all, but I was really trying. It took so long to study the subject in order to write about it. And another thing, there isn't always the work you want. So, in conclusion I've been very satisfied writing my original content for Hubpages, my blogs, and elsewhere on the Internet, but I still have those sites there if I need to make some quick money. For having the choice, I'm truly grateful as a writer.

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    • Lowdown0 profile image
      Author

      Robbie Newport 2 years ago from Eugene, Oregon

      Thanks AussieAdventure, if you dedicate your writing to a couple platform and gradually maximize your potential there with the available tools then you can make even a $1,000 a month likely, but it depends on the platform of course. With Hubpages it's hard to make even $20/month, I think if I really tried I could make about $200 here after 6 months.

      You should really check out writing eBooks for Kindle Direct Publishing. Just look that up and you can write an eBook and make a steady stream of money from it every month! It's kind of funny, but an article I had called RV Living was originally written on Squidoo and made basically nothing in 6 months, then moved to InfoBarrel, but they rejected it and closed my account? What, wierd... it's just an RV article... So I made an eBook out of it for fun to see if I could do it. It worked with a couple YouTube video tutorials on formatting the document.

      So, this RV Living eBook that was a waste of space for everyone, well it has made me and estimated $125 in 6 months! Makes me laugh a bit, cause it's been my best seller out of the 7 eBooks I've written.

      Just write how you want and about what you want. That is the key to success writer friend.

    • AussieAdventure profile image

      Cassandra 2 years ago from Geelong VIC Australia

      Hi Robbie, great article. You have given me lots of food for thought, or is that thought about pennies. I like writing and would love to make a bit of money from my writing and also share my ideas and views with others.

    • Aubrey Durkin profile image

      Aubrey Durkin 3 years ago from Tucson, Arizona

      Nice! I'm playing with keywords to see if I can increase traffic.

    • Lowdown0 profile image
      Author

      Robbie Newport 3 years ago from Eugene, Oregon

      Hey there Aubrey, I tried that for a couple of my blogs. I made a video talking about the topic I was blogging about and funneled them together. I didn't have too much success with either, but that's not to say it wouldn't work if done better or more consistently. Generally, my YouTube vlogs are similar to some of the recent topics I've been writing about, naturally, so at times I put them in. I guess the amount of traffic I produce doesn't merit enough people watching a video to notice a difference as much. Although with certain topics it could be different, for instance I put an Amazon FBA video up on my selling books on Amazon and Ebay Hub, and it has gained some views. I think it's worth a shot!

    • Aubrey Durkin profile image

      Aubrey Durkin 3 years ago from Tucson, Arizona

      That's good! Have you thought about using your articles as a quasi-script for similar YouTube videos? I'm going to try that with all of my blogs once I get back from my work trip.

    • Lowdown0 profile image
      Author

      Robbie Newport 3 years ago from Eugene, Oregon

      Oh yes, shameless plugs to my own content. One of the topics I tend to write about often is writing itself, thinking maybe it may help someone at some time or another.

    • Aubrey Durkin profile image

      Aubrey Durkin 3 years ago from Tucson, Arizona

      I like how you put links to your other articles at the end. I'm going to start doing that.

    • Lowdown0 profile image
      Author

      Robbie Newport 3 years ago from Eugene, Oregon

      You got it nanderson500, I have never grown past the level three at Textbroker, so I have to be crafty to get in there at the right times and snag a piece. I usually find more work I want to do at Hirewriters, which I have written a new hub about by the way. Happy writing!

    • nanderson500 profile image

      nanderson500 3 years ago from Seattle, WA

      I've been on Textbroker for a long time. It doesn't pay particularly well, but there is a pretty consistent stream of work most of the time. I've never heard of Hirewriters, but I will definitely plan on checking it out. Thanks for the great info!

    • Lowdown0 profile image
      Author

      Robbie Newport 3 years ago from Eugene, Oregon

      I agree, I've heard of another way to write for products on your own blog, they pay you for the post? Or ghost blogging pays better, but I don't like this idea because you have to give up your rights to the work and it could be an opinion piece. That means they can change what you've written too, that's no good for me.

      Hirewriters doesn't pay any better, but I found it easier to use and work for. Also you can get started right away instead of waiting for having your example piece rated. They pay every week as well through PayPal, also you don't have to give tax info there.

    • AOkay12 profile image

      AOkay12 3 years ago from Florida

      I write for Textbroker, but never heard of Hirewriters (guess I will check them out). You are right, Textbroker doesn't usually have jobs that people want to work on and the pay is quite bad for anyone lower than a level 5 writer. I think that revenue sharing websites are a better way to make money long-term than writing for content mills. Freelance writing for your own private clients (at higher pay) or creating content for a website that you own is even better.

    • Lowdown0 profile image
      Author

      Robbie Newport 3 years ago from Eugene, Oregon

      Hirewriters just sent me an email saying they have over 400 jobs available. Usually they have around 200. Try Hirewriters first and then Textbroker, this is my advice. Any questions, just ask.

    • Ruthbro profile image

      Ruthbro 3 years ago from USA

      I think I will explore this!

    • Lowdown0 profile image
      Author

      Robbie Newport 3 years ago from Eugene, Oregon

      Thanks Ruthbro, in the winter I will work the content mills a bit until I make enough otherwise, so it's nice to have the option.

    • Ruthbro profile image

      Ruthbro 3 years ago from USA

      Interesting!