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How I Made $10,000 Playing Minecraft

Updated on December 13, 2017

Yes, it is true, I made $10,000 from a Minecraft server from a $15.99 investment. It all began with my interest in Pokemon and the rise of Pixelemon in Minecraft mods. Pixelmon was a mod that allowed the user to modify the game as if the player was playing Pokemon in the open world free to build his own destiny. It was not my intention to create the biggest (cracked) Pixelmon server all I wanted to do was play Pokemon with my cousin.

This is the image of when i bought the server and upgraded to one of the highest options within a month.
This is the image of when i bought the server and upgraded to one of the highest options within a month. | Source

Playing a game

It all began in 2013 when we were playing Pixelmon in a 50 people server and a massive amount of lag. The server was called PixelNation and although it the server ping was over 9000 I had my greatest moments spending hours a day just to craft some pokeballs. I remember I would miss school because I wanted to build another home or I wanted to perfect my Pokemon team. Suddenly, over the server broadcast system, it was announced that the server was going to shut down within the week. Although I donated money to help the server stay online the pesky owner decided to run away with everyone's money. A few days passed since the server shut down and I wanted to find another server to play in. Unfortunately, every server I turned to was so plain and underdeveloped it was not worth my time to invest in. Then in October of 2013, I decided to create my own Pixelmon server called Sinnoh Region.

Buying my server

I had officially made my deposit of $15.99 to MCprohosting a hosting company to host my Minecraft server. I was finally happy with my own server where I could do whatever I wanted and I was bored within 10 minutes of having full power. I decided I was going to allow people to join the server and help me build it up to form a community. So I download a screen capture system and recorded a video on youtube. The video was not a hit, but I was lucky and it got me my first community of 2 people plus me. The first person that joined was "Drum" and his best friend who wanted to play on an abanded server. I sort of forgot about the server and with the month I had about 100+ constant people playing on the server with "Drum" being my first admin who was trying to run the server smoothly. Yes, "Drum" was a 13-year-old power abuser but without him, I would not have had an admin who told every person "this is not my problem, just play the game and STFU." So I finally had accomplished what I wanted a server to play with more people and just have fun. So I thought.

Expanding

At this point, I had reached what economics call, the law of diminishing returns. In other words the more people I got into the server the more lag the server got, but I need more people to get a better server to host more people. It is an infinite paradox, one which I needed the money to run the server without shutting down. So I went back to my recording device and created another video displaying the beauty of the server and the community. I did not get the response I thought I was going to get; I was a youtube with 0 subscribers and the video I posted got over 25,000 views. Every day I logged on the server was full of 500 people and whenever one person left his spot was immediately replaced. I had officially created the biggest cracked Pixelmon server in the world. I was advertising in-game items at the store for real currency.


I had my own forum for my server where people could register and buy in-game items for real money. It was a hit there were items listing from $1.00 all the way to $500.00. The items included dumb things such as a rank next to your name or 100 pokeballs. It gave an advantage to the player who did not want to farm for the items. There were about three ballers in the server who for some reason decided to waste a lot of money in a game they have not bought. One person bought about $3,000.00, the other two about $5,000.00 combined. The extra $2,000.00 came from the average poor person buying the $1.00 - $20.00 items.

Shutting the server down

I remember logging on to the server every day and being so bored and annoyed of the people. Whenever I logged in, I would receive about 100 messages of people asking for free stuff or reporting bugs. This was what made me miserable because all I wanted to do was play Pixelmon just like everyone else but, I was the owner and people needed me. Every day instead of playing Pokemon my screen looked like I was coding because I had to fix plugins or I had to arrange the configs or I had to clean the server to run smooth, I was so fed up with everything that I decided to bail, I just left the server and never came back. I removed my debit card from the server billing system and the server ran for three extra months. At this time My servers cost were at about $200 per months and I was not going to pay any more.


Just like that, I created a server and within a few months, I created the biggest cracked Pixelmon server. Yes, there was competition but there was no server who could pass 150 people constantly. I technically created my online company and decided to shut it down due to the constant stress and boredom. This company made me a net gain of $10,000.00 while I was a sophomore in high school and it was all through the passion of Pokemon and video games. I never wanted to create a company but through the passion of a game, I turned my love of poke-hunting to a business.




This goes out to everyone who helped me out create the server. RIP Sinnoh Region. RIP Pixelmon. You came in my darkest moments, and you gave me friends and memories I will never forget.

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