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Thank You Sir! May I Have Another?

Updated on July 21, 2016
Why do we keep asking for another?
Why do we keep asking for another? | Source

Assume the position: bent over at the waist, butt sticking out in the air, ready to be struck yet again in the posterior by those in power. After the strike, we state "Thank you sir! May I have another!" time and time again, willingly accepting what those in power do to us over and over and over again.

I'm tired of it. Arent' you?

Last Christmas, our eldest daughter gave my wife and I a couple of gift cards as gifts. Well thought out and quite nice, if you ask me. One to a local restaurant, the other to the movie theater. Things being what they are, we had not used them yet. Saturday we used the restaurant one for a nice lunch for the family. Sunday, my wife suggested I take our youngest to see a movie. She and I are not real big on theaters, in part due to the extremely loud movies themselves.

Question: Why are the theaters so loud? Do they think we are deaf? I have been to rock concerts in my youth that weren't half as loud as a theater today. My son and I literally sat at the very back of the theater, as far from the speakers as possible. We still had to bend over and yell into each other's ear to be understood. Problem #1 in my book.

Problem #2: the cost. He and I went at 12:45 PM, during what is laughingly called the Matinee. In days of yore, this time lead to a lower cost ticket. A nine year old and my tickets cost $15.00 for the movie at this time. When we went in, there were possibly ten other people in the theater. Seating would hold 272, so they were just a bit under the Fire Marshall's limit.

About a third of the way through the movie, he asked if we could get something to drink and some popcorn. So we wandered back to the lobby and went to the counter. I stood in disbelief at the prices. A small drink, 16 ounces, was $4.75; large $6.00. Popcorn ran to similar pricing and the candy was unbelieveable! A box of candy which can be purchased at a local store for $1.00 or less cost $4.00 or more. I settled on the only combo they had listed, two large drinks and a large popcorn. This was the only item we could get refills on if we so desired. When the young lady gave me the total, I almost went into cardiac arrest there on the spot. $17.75! Shaking like a leaf, I handed over the gift card in order that it be used first before paying the remainder. Staggering off, I had to allow my son to lead me back to the theater and get me settled in.

How can they seriously expect families to go out for a movie at those prices? Had I not had the gift card, this simple little day time father and son jaunt to the movies would have cost me a cool $35.00 for two hours of ear shattering noise and minimum enjoyment. As a side note, I will say that at this theater which contains no less than a dozen or more movies showing at the same time held no more than 30 people or so that I saw. That is coming in, watching the movie, going to the restroom, and purchasing (being robbed) at the snack bar. In our movie there were perhaps eight or ten people total for the showing.

If I owned the theater, I would rather have more people in attendance at a lower per person price. For example, if I cut prices to $5.00 per person and saw attendance rise to thirty or forty people, I would make more money for the same time frame, right? And if I cut my prices at the snack bar to a more reasonable rate, I would sell more product. But these greedy people see only the immediate returns on their movies. Charge ten or more dollars per person and get only a few people in to watch. They then jack the prices up even more in order to help their bottom line thereby causing even more people to not be able to afford to come and see the movie.

Do they not understand the simplicity of lower price = more profit? Perhaps they need to read Sam Walton's "Made In America" book in order to understand how retail should work. For that matter, maybe Walmart management and home office need to read it again in order to do it right.

What if they lowered the prices?

 
Current Prices
Lower Prices
$10 per ticket cost
$10.00
$5.00
Number of people
10
40
Money made
$100.00
$200.00

Okay, I got that off my chest for the time being. But there are so many other situations we willingly place ourselves into and hand over our money. Theme parks for instance. In our state we have three primary theme parks one can go to. Worlds of Fun in Kansas City; Six Flags in St. Louis; and Silver Dollar City in Branson. Of the three, we enjoy SDC the most, but is has become cost prohibitive to go there. A one day ticket now costs in excess of $60.00 per person, while a season pass is over a hundred. Gas to and from adds another $30.00 minimum. If one chose to spend a night, add another hundred. A meal at the park for a family of five will exceed $80.00 for burgers, fries, and a drink. Parking adds $10.00 so a family of five for a day of fun would easily cost close to $500.00. Who has that kind of money?

Worlds of Fun is even more costly, and is twice as far away. Six Flags is three times as far, so an overnight stay would be required. Add to that the last time I stayed in St. Louis and our vehicle was stolen right off the Ramada Inn parking lot and you get the picture. I am not going to do this! A family could easily spend $1,000.00 for a couple of nights and days at such a location. Is this really what America does for fun?

Why do we continually place ourselves in this position?

How many of you spend this kind of money at a theme park?

See results

When did it come to this? Have I been that out of touch with movies and theaters like this? For a while here in town we had a theater that ran movies several months after they were released and only charged a buck. $1.00 per person to see the movie. Drinks and popcorn and such were a more reasonable cost and a family could easily go to a movie for under $20.00. Not any more.

Everything is about the almightly dollar. Movies show millions of dollars in ticket sales, but what does that really show us? Only that the cost is outrageous. Hollywood, post your numbers in number of tickets sold if you want to see how they stack up against films from the past, not dollars. Telling me you made $500,000,000.00 on Avatar doesn't mean squat to me; your ticket sales probably weren't as good as Gone With The Wind's were, you just charged more and it was seen in more places.

Can you believe the cost?!?
Can you believe the cost?!? | Source

While commiserating with fellow employees today, I received somewhat of an education. See I am a basically honest person. I drive the speed limit; I open doors for people; I treat people the way I want to be treated. It never occurred to me to do what a co-worker said that his family does. Are you ready?

They movie hop! They will buy a ticket for an afternoon movie, then after it ends hop into another movie rather than leave. They might even catch a third movie if they feel like it. How do they do this? Well, the theaters have set themselves up where they have one way onto the theater, then all these hallways where the movies are shown in different rooms. No one who works in the theater pays any attention to people inside these halls, as people get up and go to the restroom or go out front to buy snacks and drinks. They don't ask to see your ticket unless you leave the immediate area. One can wander the halls for hours popping in and out seeing several different films in one day for the price of a single admission.

I was shocked! My first impression is one of disbelief. Why, that's illegal! You are stealing! Being dishonest! Then, a little voice in the back of my head that I didn't even know existed spoke.

"Remember the Golden Rule? Treat others the way you want to be treated? Well, the theaters are doing just that to you!" Huh?

They charge you to the point of being highway robbery for drinks, snacks, and tickets. They are showing you how they want to be treated! Go ahead, steal from us! After all, we are doing it to you!

Now, I am not saying I could do this, even knowing what I know. But the thought of getting back at them for what they are doing does have some merits to a point. I am ashamed at the thought, but really, why not? There is no earthly reason tickets should cost that much, nor popcorn cost anywhere near what they charge for it. By charging so much they dare you to not come, or to come but movie hop in order to get your money's worth. Don't they?

At heart, I am honest enough to say I won't do this. But it does sound tempting, doesn't it? Sneak in to see three movies in a day, carry in candy or water in a bag so one doesn't have to pay ten dollars for a bottle of water and a box of Hot Tamales?

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    • profile image

      KatNSam 3 years ago

      I realize this is an older post, but I just came across it today.

      As a former owner of a small family movie theater, I totally understand why prices of movie tickets and concessions at the franchise theaters are so high (I don’t agree, but I do understand). I tried to have lower prices and I went out of business. Why? Primary reason - Movie licensing fees. Secondary reason – people don’t work for free.

      To show a movie that is already out on DVD/Bluray, the licensing companies charge a flat rate per showing, plus up to 30% of your box office ticket sales (and that’s a good deal). To show a new release (especially if it is a big name title or actor/actress), you typically have to pay the flat rate charge plus 100% of your box office ticket sales for opening week, with a decreasing percentage for each week you are allowed to show the movie. Depending upon the production company, if you are not a franchise, you may only get to show their movie for 2-3 weeks. And even a franchise may be limited in the number of showings/week they are allowed to offer the movie. So, think about opening week for a box office hit. The theater is only making money off of the concessions, not the ticket sales.

      My theater only had licensing rites to show movies after they were out on DVD/Bluray (getting a first run license is nearly impossible, unless you are part of a franchise or work with only one licensing company – then your movie titles are limited). For as little as $5/person (our matinee price) you could get your ticket, small popcorn, and a can of soda. Unfortunately, this only covers the cost of the movie license IF you sell enough tickets. Remember, you still have to pay the workers behind the counter, the electric bill, etc.

      I’m not saying its right, just that I understand why the prices are so high. But, enough people are apparently willing to pay the piper, therefore the costs don’t go down. I live in a small town with a small population, and unfortunately the high cost of movie licensing was the primary reason I had to close the doors to my theater. Just not enough people want to come to see a movie they can watch from the comfort of their own home on DVD/Bluray or Netflix.

      Oh, and if you are going to one of the smaller mom-n-pop movie theaters, please do not movie hop or bring your own snacks! This is a sure fire way to put them out of business.

    • CrisSp profile image

      CrisSp 4 years ago from Sky Is The Limit Adventure

      Geez, I can't even remember the last time I went to see a movie in the theater. No. 1--I don't really have the time. 2. I'd like to be comfy while I watch, meaning on my pajamas preferably next to my daughter and my hubby. 3. I'm not one to waste my money. Well, depending on the story and the mood I must say.

      I noticed everything is cheaper in the US than here in Canada. No wonder, Canadians are going gaga crossing the border for shopping, etc. Here, it will cost us $11 to 13 to watch a movie. Matinee, I believe is half the price. A bag of popcorn, hotdog and soda (refillable) combo would cost you around $24. You go shopping for other stuff, make sure you add 13% tax on top of it. Anyway, here I digress.

      So, in the future. I'll sneak in my water botttle and some snacks in my bag. I told my teen-daughter this and she does when she goes out with her friends.

      Good hub. I enjoyed it. Thank you.

    • bravewarrior profile image

      Shauna L Bowling 4 years ago from Central Florida

      Mike, I don't even go to the movies anymore for that very reason. I think the last one I attended was Dark Shadows with my son a couple of Mothers Day's ago.

      We do have a $1 theater close to my house, however. Tomorrow night a friend of mine and I are going to see The Great Gatsby. I'll probably pop some popcorn before I leave and smuggle it in the theater. I would imagine they make up for the cheap ticket prices at the snack bar!

    • Mr Archer profile image
      Author

      Mr Archer 4 years ago from Missouri

      Poolman that's a great idea. Free movies for the cost of the snacks. Love it!

      Bill, this was the first movie (other than an occasional one in a nearby city that does do lower cost weekend runs) at this theater that I have been to in.... oh about five years or so. I was amazed!!!

      I would love to go see my Cardinals play, but St Louis is @ 400 miles away, so gas would run upwards of $130; a room would be $100; food up and back perhaps another $100; to say nothing of parking, souvenirs, assorted nothings and so on. Tickets start at $6, but I think those are across the street outside the gate watching a small black and white Tv. Realistic tickets start at $40 and go up from there. A family of four, like you stated, is almost out of reach for the vast majority of Americans. I am taking my youngest to see the Double A Card's in Springfield Labor Day. Tickets beside the Cardinal dugout cost $9 each. We will be in row 2, right close to the action. Can't wait!

      Take care, Gentlemen. Stay safe and watch your pennies! Blessings your way.

    • billybuc profile image

      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Bev and I love to go to movies, but we only see one every two months because of the prices you mentioned.

      One case that breaks my baseball-lover's heart is professional sports. I would love to go see the Mariners play a couple time each summer. Seattle is 60 miles from where we live, so just the price of gas is prohibitive, but then when you get to the park....parking, twenty bucks...tickets to the game....an easy eighty for two tickets...food? bottom line, two people can't see a game for less than $100 and that's being hopeful. No way a family of four, and I'm talking normal people with an average income, can see a professional game.

      Yes, I agree with all that you said, Mike. :)

      bill

    • profile image

      Old Poolman 4 years ago

      I have often thought the movie should be free as much as they make off the popcorn and sodas. My wife accuses me of being half deaf, but most movies are way to loud for me. With the volume they run in the movie theaters, we will have a few generations of children who's favorite word is "huh."