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A Well Regulated Militia to Protect Our School Kids

Updated on February 4, 2016

Good Guys in Blue With Guns

Mini Police Station in Thailand. Why not in  our schools?
Mini Police Station in Thailand. Why not in our schools? | Source

No way NRA. Take your guns and go away

My feelings about having the NRA responsible for watching over our children are known, as per a previous hub; “NRA... Stay Out of Our Schools.” I am not against protecting and defending our children. It’s how we might accomplish that task that disturbs me. If gun violence is something that rightfully concerns us, how is this for a possible remedy?

In Detroit, where I have experience, the cash strapped city has searched for ways to bring police and citizenry together for added peace and personal protection in the neighborhoods. One method that has shown positive results is the establishment of Police Mini Stations in key precincts. These mini stations are intended serve a couple of purposes. They put an active force of law enforcement officers in the middle of everyday occurrences in the neighborhoods. That Police presence serves as both a deterrent to crime and a comfort to the citizens who appreciate the safety that having police close at hand in the neighborhood affords them. It is both an affordable and sensible strategy that could temper the fears of parents and children alike.

Schools are generally located strategically throughout the population centers where everyone is familiar with their location. Why not establish Mini Police Stations (Public Safety Centers) at all the schools within a metropolitan area. Rather than assign officers to the actual precinct buildings away from the crime, put these stations smack in the middle of things, where the officers can react to any hint of danger. This could be of major benefit not only to the children but also to residents who live in proximity to these central locations.

Now we have an organized and legal “militia” that satisfies the constitution’s requirement that such a militia be “regulated”. We don't need more guns as NRA officials suggest. Having our kids in close contact with police would do wonders for community relations and certainly enhance the role and image of our dedicated and well trained officers. It would also have the effect of showing the human face of our police, the "good guys with guns" and help erase the negative feelings and distrust that inner city kids harbor about police. The move could also be seen as a cost cutting measure, thus reducing the need for freestanding police stations in favor of community involved Public Safety facilities.

Access to the schools could be controlled. All school visitors would be required to pass through the Public Safety Reception Area. How comfortable would a shooter be if he had to pass through those secure doorways? To reduce the the possible negative effect of having uniformed officers stfafing these Public Safety Centers, school officials and parents could require the officers manning these Public Safety locations to be dressed as civilians if they choose. We would not need to assign a large contingent of officers, only enough to assure a measure of safety for all.

Except for retrofitting these facilities with advanced communications systems and monitors, the added expense to a community would be small when compared to the benefits. The plan would increase the number of officers, only their placement. As a bonus, in addition to warding off crazed shooters it could also deter the effects of gangs in some areas.

Food for thought? ..... A first step to child safety and the banning of assault rifles and large capacity magazines and tightening existing regulations, especially the "gun show loophole" the NRA so vigourously defends.

Mini Station: Cute and Non-Threatening ... unless you are a shooter

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    • Mikeg422 profile image

      Michael Gill 

      5 years ago from Philadelphia, PA

      No police are under government employ, state, or local they are still government employees. Militias are primarily made up of regular citizens, regulated means militia can never be held to a different set of laws, or restrictions regaedless of their level of organisation. Very small oversight, still a great hub though.

    • Kramar profile imageAUTHOR

      Snarky Babbler 

      5 years ago from USA

      Mike I refered to police as the regulated militia. Are they not?

    • Mikeg422 profile image

      Michael Gill 

      5 years ago from Philadelphia, PA

      Kramar this is actually an excellent idea, great hub. The only exception for me personally was when you talked about a "regulated militia", when the founders wrote the second amendment it was a different era. The way constitutional law has been manipulated over the years it makes a regulated militia impossible, a regulated militia in todays world would resemble something like neighborhood watch with guns. Militia were farmers, and lawyers regular folks, police do not count as militia as they are government employed. Overall I found your article to be very enlightening voted up, good job.

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