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COULD AGE BE AN ISSUE?

Updated on February 23, 2012

Being young could be key.

This hubber predicted right, of how the CNN-Arizona-Republican Party debate would look like, in terms of who would be under the scrutiny of the public and the media.

That the focus would be on Santorum and Romney, more than on Gingrich and Paul.

As it happened, that was the case; and as if the two, Santorum and Romney, were overly aware that they would be under the harsh lights of national, live television, they went after each other like never before.

They would put "politics" aside and trade accusations that would win them the debate, which would lead to winning the Arizona and Michigan primaries; and so the idea of government or having the chance to govern as "president" was thrown out of the window; so to speak.

The ferocity of the two men was obvious, as for example, when Romney was drawing Santorum's attention to the fact that he (Santorum) was a king-pin factor in what was referred to as "earmarks".

A earmark was, and still is, something that occurred in the United States Congress; a legislative provision for directing approved funds to be spent on specific projects; and Santorum has used it to build a bridge "to nowhere", when he was the Senator from Philadelphia.

That bridge was a construction in the Alaskan doldrums, and it was a complete waste of taxpayer money; Romney had added.

Santorum fought back and said that the process of "what you just described", namely, earmark, was what saved the Salt Lake Winter Olympics that has become Romney's ideal, signature project.

The two would mud-wrestle in other issues, back and forth, from taxes to health care; making Gingrich and Paul to look helpless at times, as they could not get a word in edgewise.

However, what viewers were noticing was that there were three elderly men and a younger person wanting to gain a spot to run in the 2012 presidential election. Considering Santorum's age, he was the younger one and he would match President Barack Obama, the person that any of the four would be running against, in perhaps, strength and stamina too, for the presidency of the United States.

The other three were too pale and even off color to be standing next to Obama in a debate setting, if any of them was chosen to represent the Republican Party.

One was not making age an issue here; but it could be a question that some people would want an answer for.

From this point on, the campaign trail would require physical power and energy for the candidates to go through their assigned engagements; and the president looked as fit as a fiddle, it would be suicidal for any of the three, Paul, Gingrich and Romney, in that order, to keep up with their strength and maintain the pace to overtake him (Obama).

When it came to that, the Republicans would be at a disadvantage; they would fall victim to age differentiation, and that would be very bad for the party.

Many doubted, if there would be a match for Obama. Santorum? Maybe. However, any of the rest of the field? Who could categorically say?

P.S. Take note, I never used the word "old".

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