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China Blames USA for Hong Kong Protests

Updated on August 12, 2019
Hong Kong protests
Hong Kong protests
Julie meeting with protest leaders
Julie meeting with protest leaders
American flags in HK
American flags in HK

Let's Blame America!

Until very recently, China has not blamed any foreign entity for the unrest in their special area called Hong Kong. Special because this province was under British control for 150 years until given back to China with agreement that it would remain free and democratic until 2050. It was a sort of "grace period" for the locals to finally decide whether to leave HK or stay under Chinese laws. China has called the protesters "act of terrorism" especially after protesters closed HK Internatiional Airport. China has threatened with the use of force to take control of the HK situation, which could cause widespread rebellion.

The current HK protests have been going on for the past 10 weeks, with millions of demonstrators facing off with HK police and many times ending in violence. To the world outside, it's a head scratcher.

The Reason

HK's history is so steeped in democracy and free speech, it is no wonder why China allowed for a "grace period" for its millions. But China has been trying erode some of the freedoms that those on the mainland do not enjoy. One such effort caused the current protests. China wants those criminals arrested in Hong Kong to face trial in China. HK has more of a British criminal system to a certain degree.To those in Hong Kong, that was the last straw because China has attempted to restrict free speech and free markets and reduce HK's autonomy.

The Politics

It was just this past week, China media came out blaming America, in part, for stirring up the anti-China sentiment. One does not have to look far see why. Trump's trade war and tariffs have angered the Chinese government. While they did devalue their currency, they also released a photo of Judith Eadah, the political chief of the U.S. Consulate in HK meeting with the leaders of the mass protesters. It was fed to the Chinese media outlets stating that she was an expert in subversion in Iraq and now was in HK doing the same. Not only did they name her, but also her family details and personal information. The Chinese media also went on to include the CIA for instigating a "color revolution" similar to those used in former Soviet states 10 years ago. The mass protesters were being rallied by American interests.

The U.S. Consulate refused to comment on the veracity but did call the Chinese government a "thuggish regime" several times in their response.

The weird thing is that up until Trump went to trade war with them, the Chinese did not think the US had anything to do with the HK protests that blocked much business and roads.

But in the very end, around 2040 and later, the fact is that HK residents will need to make a decision about their lives because HK will become part of China under Chinese laws. It will not be a democracy with free press and trade. So, in a sense, the current protests are just a tantrum.

Comments

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    • perrya profile imageAUTHOR

      perrya 

      11 months ago

      Very true. China actually does not need HK like they did in 1997, HK now is more of legacy problem. It will be interesting to see what they do. Surely, they hate seeing the US flag flown around in places.

    • emge profile image

      MG Singh 

      11 months ago from Singapore

      I have always believed that China hàd no tradition or grounding in democracy. It's something alien to the Chinese leadership. We should not forget that China was earlier an autocratic monarchy which was replaced by war Lord's and later on by the communist party. Thus the protestors in Hong Kong are not aware what will happen to them like the Tiananmen massacre. I do feel the young boys and girls are not aware what will happen. I am also keeping my fingers crossed so that innocent blood is not she'd.

    • bradmasterOCcal profile image

      Brad 

      11 months ago

      I believe that is what the protesters are protesting. They believe autonomy meant they were not subject to direct China Rule. Now China wants them to be under China Rule.

      That is what I got out the reporting?

      Apparently China was at this same point, Flashback to China’s Tiananmen Square 30 years ago, to the days and weeks before the Chinese government’s brutal crackdown on June 4, 1989 — and to the very different world back then. Thousands of peaceful protesters, many camped out in tents, had reason to believe that China was on the brink of joining the democratic wave sweeping the communist world from the then-Soviet Union and Eastern Europe.

      The atmosphere in Tiananmen Square was festive — so safe, I felt, that I carried my infant son, Tom, around with me as I reported on the uprising.

      This is what I believe that the news reports are comparing the HK protests.??

    • perrya profile imageAUTHOR

      perrya 

      11 months ago

      Not sure about the wording but CNN is the only network streaming live coverage, which begs the question, how do news agencies priortize their coverage? Just now, the police tried to storm the Airport but were blocked by thousands of protesters. Dramatic.

    • bradmasterOCcal profile image

      Brad 

      11 months ago

      I hear the problem between China and HK is that when China made their agreement with HK autonomy was not a well defined word. That is now there seems to be an interpretation problem with the agreement.

      It is hard to believe that there could be that much vagueness and ambiguity with a world full of international lawyers. Was the China and HK agreement written and accepted while not being iron clad to preclude this vagueness to allow the obvious interpretation of autonomy to become disputed by China?

      This is on the same level as Bill Clinton discussing is is, when the matter was a clear as DNA.

    • perrya profile imageAUTHOR

      perrya 

      11 months ago

      Seems like China is massing at the HK border with another day of shut down of HK airport

    • bradmasterOCcal profile image

      Brad 

      11 months ago

      I agree, but maybe they learned from previous intervention?

      That is my fantasy sorry.

    • perrya profile imageAUTHOR

      perrya 

      11 months ago

      Of course, they break contracts all the time, here, they are eroding HK's freedoms, or trying to. Should the Chinese military enter to breakup the protests, it will really get bad for all.

    • bradmasterOCcal profile image

      Brad 

      11 months ago

      Isn't it more like China going back on its word about the HK's promised freedom that the protests exist?

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