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Nearly Nuked 3 - How Stanislav Yevgrafovich Petrov Saved the World.

Updated on February 22, 2015
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Starlight is an evil genius whose neither evil nor dominating the world. But he's a good Dad who supports his family working from home.

A mindless system would have launched perhaps without human intervention. How bad is it when such destruction relies on the good-sense of human beings to intervene?
A mindless system would have launched perhaps without human intervention. How bad is it when such destruction relies on the good-sense of human beings to intervene? | Source

Russian Retaliatory Strike? Would That Be a Big Deal?

Well, if it would have launched, I wouldn't be writing this, because this computer, the internet, and probably you and I wouldn't exist. They had enough to destroy the world, but they wouldn't have done that, only a few continents would have been destroyed, that's all.

It was September 26, 1983, Stanislav was the officer on duty at the command center for the Oko nuclear early-warning satellite system that reported that a missile was being launched from the United States. Stanislav judged the report to be a false alarm,[1] His judgment call was made against protocol, which also required two sources for retaliation. Just as he didn't follow protocol, the next officer may not have waited for the second source to launch the attack.

You might say this wasn't as close a call as the others in this series. But in terms of the potential fallout, both figurative and literal, this averted disaster takes the cake.

Soviet Missile Command Defense Display (parody)

An example of perhaps the sophistication of 1983 Soviet Missile Defense System Technology - Atari's "Missile Command"
An example of perhaps the sophistication of 1983 Soviet Missile Defense System Technology - Atari's "Missile Command" | Source
It's a good thing this handsome gentlemen wasn't the officer on duty. Why? He's Joe Stalin, murderer of 50 million people. Almost as bad as if WW3 had begun in 1983.
It's a good thing this handsome gentlemen wasn't the officer on duty. Why? He's Joe Stalin, murderer of 50 million people. Almost as bad as if WW3 had begun in 1983. | Source

Red Hammers and Blue Nails

Great, right? Well, it got worse. The same computers identified four more missiles in the air and above ground radar detection. All five were directed towards the Soviet Union. Our friend Petrov employed more good sense and guessed that the computer system was still malfunctioning, as it had been known to do in the past. There was no other source of information to confirm or deny the authenticity of the information, only his good sense vs. typical human nonsense.

Just think, I was an 8 year-old kid playing war games, pretending to kill the evil Russians whose U.S.S.R. was our mortal enemy. Perhaps at that very moment, a Soviet-Russian Officer employed the most admirable human reasoning skills to prevent a sad series of events ending in mutually-assured destruction. In some ways it seems unimaginable that he would have set war in motion, but when you're a hammer, everything tends to look like a nail.

Petrov Receiving the Dresden Prize in February 2013

Better it ended this way with a Soviet getting an award, even though he is a Red-Commie Bastard. Just kidding! I am an American child of the 80's, you'll have to forgive my impulses.
Better it ended this way with a Soviet getting an award, even though he is a Red-Commie Bastard. Just kidding! I am an American child of the 80's, you'll have to forgive my impulses. | Source

© 2014 Doug DeWalt

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    Doug DeWalt 3 years ago from Ohio USA

    It seems we can be a danger to ourselves worse than most enemies. I just can't believe these aren't bigger news, there isn't much of a difference between a near miss and an actual disaster in my mind. I'm glad you agree! It's nice to hear from you!

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    Howard Schneider 3 years ago from Parsippany, New Jersey

    The nuclear near miss incidents you have described in your 3 Hubs are very disturbing. It seems like we have been extremely lucky up to this point. It makes you think that we are on borrowed time. Excellent Hubs, Starlightreflex.