ArtsAutosBooksBusinessEducationEntertainmentFamilyFashionFoodGamesGenderHealthHolidaysHomeHubPagesPersonal FinancePetsPoliticsReligionSportsTechnologyTravel
  • »
  • Politics and Social Issues»
  • Social Issues

I Am but a Boy-I am an Aboriginal Boy

Updated on June 12, 2017
threekeys profile image

Threekeys is a freelance writer and poet who loves burning candles; drinking cafe lattes; and standing under Moreton Bay Fig Trees.

I talk to my North Sea. I have two choices. The low road or the high road. I want the high road.
I talk to my North Sea. I have two choices. The low road or the high road. I want the high road. | Source

Introduction

This is for you, Dylan Voller.

As I watched your story on 60 Minutes Australia, I couldn’t believe that you were treated in the way you were, in that Northern Territory Youth Detention Centre. The tears just kept rolling down my cheeks as I heard your distressing story.

You didn’t deserve that treatment, Dylan.

You deserve a good life.

To me, your Will is strong because you are a Leader in the Making and I believe many people are going to need you and you are going to be their Rock of Gibraltar.

This poem is dedicated to you Dylan Voller. I wish I could take all those years of pain away. Just keep speaking up. Thinking of you.

May beauty now override all that was painful and ugly in Dyaln Voller's life.
May beauty now override all that was painful and ugly in Dyaln Voller's life. | Source

I Am but a Boy-I Am an Aboriginal Boy

A female who didn’t know

When to stop

No education and no money in tow


Gives birth to six children on the hilltop

She cannot care for them alone

The boy cannot understand at school


Shamed and embarrassed groans, sewn

Back chats and misbehaves

The boy badly needs a padrone


I am but a boy

I am an aboriginal boy



I need a friend to look out for me

To care for me

I learn to do the steal hit and runs


I need a friend to be my cup of tea

Later, I even try Ice

It makes me a bully tree


Punching and attacking others is not nice

From eleven to nineteen

It’s the luck of dice


I am but a boy

I am an aboriginal boy



Escaping the confines Dylan's four walls
Escaping the confines Dylan's four walls | Source


I am in and out of juvenile detention

Here was food, shelter and respect

I’ll make it through the tension


Jumped on, and decked

Thrown across the cell

It’s child neglect


The Guards tower over me

Put into isolation for six weeks

I start talking to my North Sea


I am but a boy

I am an aboriginal boy



Source


I can’t stand it

I feel I will go insane

I am so far down in this pit


Pushed to the ground, chained

Stripped naked

Forced to lay slain


Cold concrete floor tasted

I am a defenceless boy

I’m hated, I’m scared


I am but a boy

I am an aboriginal boy




Please stop doing that

I spit in their faces

Now I am strapped sat


In a chair, faceless

A bag tight around my neck

For hours at a time, nameless


I am no angel effect

But I know I never deserved

The hate and torturous events


I am but a boy

I am an aboriginal boy



Dylan Voller was an eleven-year-old boy when he first entered the Northern Territory youth detention centre system. He is now nineteen years of age and on parole, learning to trust people again by working with wild horses that are learning to being tamed by humans.




What can we do as outsiders to help prevent children entering the system?

See results

© 2017 ThreeKeys

Comments

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment

    • threekeys profile image
      Author

      ThreeKeys 3 months ago from Australia

      Yes I agree with you in that circumstances and the surrounding environment has a big impact on one's life. It's difficult to do otherwise if you are bombarded 24/7 when there is no way of escaping or altering those dynamics to support you for a better out come.Thankyou for taking an interest.

    • Harishprasad profile image

      Harish Mamgain 3 months ago from India

      Charmaine, young people go wrong sometime, if they are given the right counseling ,they can always come back to the right track. No one is born good or bad, circumstances and the environment make one so. Torture and hate will only complicate the mindset of the already spoilt youth. A good poem with a right message.

    • threekeys profile image
      Author

      ThreeKeys 3 months ago from Australia

      Apologize for my typos

    • threekeys profile image
      Author

      ThreeKeys 3 months ago from Australia

      Apologize for my typos

    • threekeys profile image
      Author

      ThreeKeys 3 months ago from Australia

      Apologize for my typos

    • threekeys profile image
      Author

      ThreeKeys 3 months ago from Australia

      I believe children the neeed the balnce of yin and yang energies in their lives whether it comes through the parents in their lives or through the surrounding family friends.

      Eric, if I may say, it never ceases to amaze me at the breadth of your life experiences. I don't know if it is because you live in America-"where they say anything can happen." Or, whether you have been lucky? Whichever way, your children can only benefit greatly from the range of your life experiences.

    • Ericdierker profile image

      Eric Dierker 3 months ago from Spring Valley, CA. U.S.A.

      Charmaine this is really good. I grew up with our aboriginals. Hope and Navajo mainly. Back in the 50's their lot was not much better regardless of conduct. And now we pay the price for treating them so badly.

      Children of any group that lack a close paternal type mentor are bound to be lost at least for a time. Men need to step up both in and out of their homes. I hope I do enough.

    • threekeys profile image
      Author

      ThreeKeys 3 months ago from Australia

      Yes, I am not proud of us as a nation in having our indigenous people being treated in the way we have treated them. We all have a lot of work to do. Thank you for reading my poem Aristotle. Take care.

    • threekeys profile image
      Author

      ThreeKeys 3 months ago from Australia

      Thank you for making me aware there is more to Dylan's story than revealed on the current affairs program, Jodah.But I will still stand, he was a child. And doing such things to him by grown up men is still not okay. I don't believe in the death penalty either.

    • Jodah profile image

      John Hansen 3 months ago from Queensland Australia

      This is a well written poem, ThreeKeys, and I agree that aboriginal boys need support and understanding. Apart from that my comments may take a totally different view..especially concerning Dylan Voller. My son works as a correctional officer at Don Dale Correctional Centre, Darwin. Admittedly he was not there at the time four years ago when Dylan was incarcerated. However, I know the in-depth background of the case and things that have not been revealed on TV. Your poem says "I am no angel" but if you knew some of the things he has done (much worse than revealed on TV) you would know just how true that statement is.

    • Aristotle Junior profile image

      Aristotle Wilson 3 months ago from Vancouver

      The treatment of aboriginials- presnt and past is terrible, but wonderful poem :)