ArtsAutosBooksBusinessEducationEntertainmentFamilyFashionFoodGamesGenderHealthHolidaysHomeHubPagesPersonal FinancePetsPoliticsReligionSportsTechnologyTravel

Make Your Environmental Footprint a Good One in 5 Ways

Updated on November 18, 2016

We live in a connected world. The choices each of us make every day have an effect — good or bad — on the world around us. Unfortunately, there are still a good many of us who feel our own actions won’t amount to more than a single drop in the ocean of change needed to bring us back from the brink.

Here’s the good news: Every single one of us has the opportunity to make a difference in the world.

Every individual can make a big impact on healing the environment — even with small or simple actions — because each positive change you make will encourage your spouse, children, neighbors, friends, and co-workers to make similar changes. And over time, these actions will combine to create a tidal wave of positive change for the planet.

Everyday Choices That Heal the Environment

All it takes is one idea, one action, or one person to start a revolution of change.

Look at the legacy of the Toyota Prius. In the early 2000s, when gas-guzzling SUVs ruled the road, Toyota introduced an eco-friendly, fuel-efficient gas-electric hybrid. It was a gamble, but it paid off. Before long, more auto companies were jumping into the hybrid revolution. Today, there are a bevy of electric vehicle options available to everyday consumers.

But you don’t have to be an automobile manufacturer to make a splash in the pool of sustainability. You don’t even have to make elaborate, sweeping lifestyle changes. Impact starts with changing your outlook, and your outlook is changed through developing new habits. All you have to do is change the way you look at and interact with the world. Evaluating your impact on the planet will not only inspire you to adopt more eco-friendly behaviors, but it will also encourage those around you to do the same.

Here are some great places to start:

If you begin by turning off at least five unused lights each day, you’ll soon establish a habit that will last a lifetime.
If you begin by turning off at least five unused lights each day, you’ll soon establish a habit that will last a lifetime. | Source

1. Flick those light switches.

Whether it’s an unused conference room at work, your kids’ room at home, or the porch light outside, turning off lights in unused rooms has been shown to have a big impact on reducing carbon emissions. And if you begin by turning off at least five unused lights each day, you’ll soon establish a habit that will last a lifetime.

With the average person using 100 gallons of water each day, many scientists predict that severe water shortages will soon be a nationwide calamity.
With the average person using 100 gallons of water each day, many scientists predict that severe water shortages will soon be a nationwide calamity. | Source

2. Turn off the hose — and the faucet.

Water shortages and droughts are becoming more frequent in the U.S. and around the world, and these issues aren’t expected to resolve anytime soon. In fact, with the average person using 100 gallons of water each day, many scientists predict that severe water shortages will soon be a nationwide calamity.

The best place to start reducing your water consumption is in the bathroom. Begin by turning the tap off while brushing your teeth. Next, shorten your showers by three minutes to save almost 2,500 gallons of water each year. Then, eliminate unnecessary toilet flushes — remember the old saying: “If it’s yellow, let it mellow. If it’s brown, flush it down.” This will save approximately two gallons per flush. And finally, place a bucket in your shower while the water is warming up, and then pour that water into your toilet tank for flushing.

Taking the stairs instead of the elevator is good for your health and the environment.
Taking the stairs instead of the elevator is good for your health and the environment. | Source

3. Stretch your legs.

Taking the stairs instead of the elevator is good for your health and the environment. Making the trek up the stairs will quickly become second nature, and when others see you skipping the lift, they’ll be inspired to do the same.

Tap water is just as clean as the stuff in the bottle, especially if you use a water filtration system.
Tap water is just as clean as the stuff in the bottle, especially if you use a water filtration system. | Source

4. Kick the cans — and bottles.

Replace sugary sodas, sports drinks, and bottled water with water straight from the tap. It’s healthier for you, and the one-and-done containers of those other drinks create overwhelming piles of waste.

Tap water is just as clean as the stuff in the bottle, especially if you use a water filtration system. In fact, the quality of tap water is regularly monitored by the Environmental Protection Agency, whereas most bottled water isn’t regulated.

Scientists at Oxford University found that meat-rich diets result in much higher carbon dioxide emissions than plant-based diets.
Scientists at Oxford University found that meat-rich diets result in much higher carbon dioxide emissions than plant-based diets. | Source

5. Start nibbling those greens.

Scientists at Oxford University found that meat-rich diets result in much higher carbon dioxide emissions than plant-based diets. Which means that eating more meat-free and dairy-free meals is not only good for you, but for Mother Earth, too!

If going completely vegetarian or vegan isn’t your thing, don’t fret. Start out making three meat-free meals each week, and work your way up to having one vegan or vegetarian meal per day — maybe a smoothie for breakfast or a soup/salad combo for lunch. There are lots of tasty possibilities, and it’s amazing how quickly you can develop the habit to pass on the burger in favor of a salad.

We can all make a positive impact on the planet by setting manageable goals and adjusting easy, everyday actions. Even the simplest efforts can inspire bigger changes in ourselves and those around us, creating a ripple effect of environmental healing.

Comments

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment

    No comments yet.

    working

    This website uses cookies

    As a user in the EEA, your approval is needed on a few things. To provide a better website experience, hubpages.com uses cookies (and other similar technologies) and may collect, process, and share personal data. Please choose which areas of our service you consent to our doing so.

    For more information on managing or withdrawing consents and how we handle data, visit our Privacy Policy at: https://hubpages.com/privacy-policy#gdpr

    Show Details
    Necessary
    HubPages Device IDThis is used to identify particular browsers or devices when the access the service, and is used for security reasons.
    LoginThis is necessary to sign in to the HubPages Service.
    Google RecaptchaThis is used to prevent bots and spam. (Privacy Policy)
    AkismetThis is used to detect comment spam. (Privacy Policy)
    HubPages Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide data on traffic to our website, all personally identifyable data is anonymized. (Privacy Policy)
    HubPages Traffic PixelThis is used to collect data on traffic to articles and other pages on our site. Unless you are signed in to a HubPages account, all personally identifiable information is anonymized.
    Amazon Web ServicesThis is a cloud services platform that we used to host our service. (Privacy Policy)
    CloudflareThis is a cloud CDN service that we use to efficiently deliver files required for our service to operate such as javascript, cascading style sheets, images, and videos. (Privacy Policy)
    Google Hosted LibrariesJavascript software libraries such as jQuery are loaded at endpoints on the googleapis.com or gstatic.com domains, for performance and efficiency reasons. (Privacy Policy)
    Features
    Google Custom SearchThis is feature allows you to search the site. (Privacy Policy)
    Google MapsSome articles have Google Maps embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    Google ChartsThis is used to display charts and graphs on articles and the author center. (Privacy Policy)
    Google AdSense Host APIThis service allows you to sign up for or associate a Google AdSense account with HubPages, so that you can earn money from ads on your articles. No data is shared unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    Google YouTubeSome articles have YouTube videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    VimeoSome articles have Vimeo videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    PaypalThis is used for a registered author who enrolls in the HubPages Earnings program and requests to be paid via PayPal. No data is shared with Paypal unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    Facebook LoginYou can use this to streamline signing up for, or signing in to your Hubpages account. No data is shared with Facebook unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    MavenThis supports the Maven widget and search functionality. (Privacy Policy)
    Marketing
    Google AdSenseThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Google DoubleClickGoogle provides ad serving technology and runs an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Index ExchangeThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    SovrnThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Facebook AdsThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Amazon Unified Ad MarketplaceThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    AppNexusThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    OpenxThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Rubicon ProjectThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    TripleLiftThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Say MediaWe partner with Say Media to deliver ad campaigns on our sites. (Privacy Policy)
    Remarketing PixelsWe may use remarketing pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to advertise the HubPages Service to people that have visited our sites.
    Conversion Tracking PixelsWe may use conversion tracking pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to identify when an advertisement has successfully resulted in the desired action, such as signing up for the HubPages Service or publishing an article on the HubPages Service.
    Statistics
    Author Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide traffic data and reports to the authors of articles on the HubPages Service. (Privacy Policy)
    ComscoreComScore is a media measurement and analytics company providing marketing data and analytics to enterprises, media and advertising agencies, and publishers. Non-consent will result in ComScore only processing obfuscated personal data. (Privacy Policy)
    Amazon Tracking PixelSome articles display amazon products as part of the Amazon Affiliate program, this pixel provides traffic statistics for those products (Privacy Policy)