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Old Ship Pictures

Updated on October 20, 2015

SS Franconia

Source

The Steam ship Franconia

Just how old steam vessels should look even if they do happen to be belching lots of black smoke which at the time was not regarded as anything bad or that this was contributing anything to the so called global warming, very debatable subject in fact, but I prefer to concentrate on the look and history of the ships built and I see things from a shipbuilders point of view.

Built in 1911 by Swan Hunter on the Tyne in England, to an order from the Cunard Steam Ship Company. This fast passenger/cargo ship was requisitioned by the Admiralty during World War One to be used as a troopship, she was sunk by a German U-Boat in 1916

SS Strathallan

SS Nieuw Holland

Source

The Dutch built fine Ships

NIEUW HOLLAND Dutch Built by the Dutch shipbuilders Nederland SB, Amsterdam. Launched in 1927 and completed for hand over some 4 months later. This fine passenger/cargo liner at around 11,000 grt with her twin screw's was capable of 15 knots and she survived the Second World War to eventual break up in 1959.

Nieuw Amsterdam

Source

The Older passenger ship

NIEUW AMSTERDAM Dutch, Launched by Harland & Wolff at Belfast in 1881 as the 'Asiatic' for the White Star Line. The single screw passenger ship was rated at 13 knots cruising speed. With room for around 900 passengers spread over 1st class and 2nd class to 3rd class, as they rated passenger travel in the days gone by.

Renamed 'Arabic', the first of the name, before her maiden voyage, Liverpool to New York in September, 1881.

Made three transatlantic voyages before being chartered to the Occidental & Oriental Steamship Company, San Francisco for their transpacific service to China and Japan.

O&O had been founded by the Southern Pacific and Central Pacific Rail-road to compete with the dominant Pacific Mail Steamship Company and mostly chartered British officered and flagged vessels from the White Star.

She returned to the White Star's transatlantic service in 1887 and after another charter to the O&O, was sold to the Holland-America Line in 1890.

Renamed 'Spaarndam', she sailed on the Company's Rotterdam-New York route until withdrawn in 1901.

This fine old ship was scrapped in England in the same year 1901.

SS Marathon

Classic Lines

The Steam Ship Marathon was a real ship whose lines and shape paid homage to the wonderful clipper bow ship built previously, with a wonderful bowsprite and forward and aft masts to complete the fine loks of this ship

SS Nairana

Source

Sea Plane Carrier

NAIRANA was launched on Monday 21 June 1915 as a passenger vessel built on the Clyde in Scotland for Huddart Parker Ltd., Melbourne, intended for their Bass Strait services in Australia.

1916 commissioned by War Cabinet and converted to a seaplane carrier, with seaplanes accommodated aft and deck landing planes forward.

Completed for the Royal Navy on 27 February 1917.

3,042 grt. with Four 4 steam turbines geared to twin screws, as built by Wm. Denny & Bros., Dumbarton. Six water tube boilers, coal fired. Top rated speed of 20 knots. Cruiser stern.

She served during WWI, including being part of the Russian campaign at Archangel.

1920 returned in ownership to Huddart Parker, in Melbourne, Australia.

1921 refitted to passenger ship status.

1922 transferred to Tasmanian Steamers, Melbourne.

She operated on the Bass Strait service for the next twenty-seven years, mostly with a companion ship, but on her own for four years during the Second World War.

Laid up in Melbourne in 1948, and on February 18th 1951 broke moorings during a heavy gale and beached. She was broken up where she was as it was found to be impossible to raise her.

Another fine ship built by the famous shipbuilders of Denny of Dumbarton, based right at the mouth of this great shipbuilding river in the West of Scotland.

SS Oronsay

SS Wahine

SS Almeda Star

SS Riverina

SS Wimmera

Source

When Ships looked like Ships

SS WIMMERA

Classic old ship built on the Clyde in Scotland by Caird & Co, of Greenock,

This fine passenger/cargo ship was destined for work in Australia and she was built and launched in 1904, capable of a speed of around 14 knots she was to meet her fate during World War One when she struck a mine off the coast of New Zealand in 1918

MV MacDhui

Source

Scottish Built

MV MACDHUI

Single screw motor vessel built as a passenger-cargo ship by Barclay, Curle & Co Glasgow in 1931. Her Diesel engine of 653 bhp could push her along at around 15 knots, with her combined cargo and passenger capacity of 140.

This fine looking ship of around 4,561 gross tons, was to meet her end during the Second World War.

She was Designed and built for the Australia-Papua New Guinea run.

With the outbreak of the Second World War she was chartered by the Australian Commonwealth Government to carry Army and Air Force personnel and supplies between Australia, Papua and New Guinea.

On 17th June 1942 she was bombed by Japanese aircraft at Port Moresby. Then again on 18th June 1942 and set on fire, when she drifted onto the reef off TatanaIsland and capsized. The MACDHUI was declared as a total loss.

SS Malolo

Source

American Classic

The SS Malolo was built by American Shipbuilders of Wm. Cramp & Sons, Philadelphia USA, she was launched in 1927 her twin screws could push her some 17,250 grt along at a speed of around 21 knots and she survived the ravages of World War Two to have a few different owners, ending with the Greek shipping line of Themistocles Nav SA, GRC Piraeus. Scrapped in 1977.

SS Asturias

Source

She played the part of Titanic

The Asturius although built by the same shipyard as the Titanic had a longer lifespan, launched by the Harland & Wolff Shipyard of Belfast in 1925.

In 1932 transferred to Royal Mail Lines Ltd. Belfast.

Then in 1934 she was Lengthened and her speed was increased by a couple of knots to achieve around 18 knots from her twin screws.

With the outbreak of war in 1939 she was converted to Armed Merchant Cruiser.

The in 1944 transferred to the Admiralty to begin work as a troopship, at the end of hostilities she was used as a government emigrant ship.

And she also played the part of TITANIC in the film "A Night to Remember".

She was broken up back in the country where she was originally built in 1957


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