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Pornography's Negative Impact on Men

Updated on October 29, 2014

The Creation of Monsters

Ariel Castro who kidnapped and imprisoned three women (who were actually children at the time Castro kidnapped them) in his Cleveland home for ten years and used them as sex slaves said while pleading guilty to almost 1000 charges against him that "My addiction to pornography...took a toll on my mind." Obviously. Would he have done what he did if he never had access to pornography? We'll never know, but maybe. Will every man who becomes addicted to pornography do what he did? Of course not. But there are some obvious ways that a porgnoraphy addiction would compel and exacerbate these kinds of crimes against humanity.

The face of Child-Kidnapper Ariel Castro superimposed over some of the many chains and restraints found in his home. Castro held 3 young girls captive for ten long years. He attributed his predator mindset in large part to his pornography addiction.
The face of Child-Kidnapper Ariel Castro superimposed over some of the many chains and restraints found in his home. Castro held 3 young girls captive for ten long years. He attributed his predator mindset in large part to his pornography addiction.

None of this is to excuse Ariel Castro or others like him from accepting the responsibility and consequences of their actions. Ariel Castro was a monster, and the world is better off without him - he committed suicide within a few months of his incarceration, apparently unable to tolerate even a fragment of what he put the young girls he captured and imprisoned through. But I believe that whether or not society makes people (and monsters) what they are, society certainly decides how to deal with its monsters. Social acceptance of pornography as normal makes it much easier for a monster like Castro to remain ignored and anonymous in this culture for such a long period of time, because it normalizes monstrous behavior and ideas and therefore camoflauges those who actually act on those ideas.

Those who become aroused by pornography and make a habit out of associating sexual pleasure with sexual violence are eventually going to want to play out their fantasies in the real world. If a man masturbates to media portraying domination, exploitation, imprisonment, torture and of course rape of women or children, eventually he is going to desire to live out his sexual fantasies in the real world. How far this goes probably has a lot to do with how much of an inner sadistic drive that individual man possesses, but his sexual fantasies become a part of his real-life sexuality whether he wants them to or not. They don’t need to be his fantasies to begin with, but the fantasies are repeatedly suggested to him, and as his addiction to pornography grows he increasingly adopts those fantasies as his own.

Pornography Addiction Destroys the Potential for a Full and Healthy Experience of One's Sexuality

This is why all porn sites have advertisements targeting men with erectile dysfunction. You might ask what a man with erectile dysfunction is doing surfing porn sites to begin with? The answer is that the high speed internet pornography of today causes erectile dysfunction in men, because it creates a feedback loop which works much like drug addiction, where an individual's response to stimuli is reduced more and more as more and more bingeing occurs. In pornography there is no caressing, no sensuality, no courtship dance, no empathy, no love and no humanity. There is no foreplay. Pornography is all about penetration. Healthy human lovemaking on the other hand, is full of all of these things.

Women's Perspective

Women, please choose the answer below which most closely matches your perspective on pornography.

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So when a pornography addict finds himself with a consenting sexual partner in the real world who wants to engage in the wide range of activities inherent in the slow build of healthy human lovemaking, he is so used to the hyperstimulation he experiences from his addiction to hardcore high speed internet pornography which focuses exclusively on penetration after penetration after penetration, he finds himself unable to participate in healthy human lovemaking. His inner fantasies no longer consist of the circumstances around successful courtship, or the excitement of breaking through the erotic taboos leading up to lovemaking; such as the excitement of getting naked with another person; instead his fantasies are centered around penetration exclusively; and in many cases, sexual violence as well. And since he is no longer so aroused by the normally erotic activities involved in the slow build of healthy human lovemaking, he has no way of preparing his flaccid penis for penetration; and thus often-times cannot even accomplish that pitiful, totally self-serving and much less satisfying toxic mimic of what healthy human lovemaking out to be; which has been the norm since the beginning of time prior to the invention of pornographic videos.

Men's Perspective

Men, please select the answer which most closely matches your opinion of pornography. Don't worry, it's 100% anonymous.

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So pornography addiction causes erectile dysfunction in those males who refuse in the real world to be the perpetrators of sexual violence. Not every guy who watches slasher horror movies is going to go out and murder women, and likewise not every man who watches pornography is going to go out and intentionally do violence to women. But the fact that a pornography addict is watching video of real sexual assault as a means of sexual arousal proves that his fantasies include sexual violence - whether those fantasies existed prior to his introduction to pornography or not, the fantasies of the pornography addict are profoundly effected by the "boundary pushing" sexual abuse that is always depicted in pornography. These men are so used to hyperstimulating images of penetration and sexualized violence that they cannot fully engage in normal human intimacy, and they may forget the differences between normal sexuality and the sexuality proposed, condoned and demonstrated by pornographers - if they are old enough to have ever known the difference in the first place. In other words, pornography, as it emphasizes and attempts to eroticize highly unequal power dynamics and sexual violence (which can cause a man who becomes addicted to pornography and is therefore repeatedly exposing himself to images of sexualized violence and linking those depictions of sexual violence in his brain with the reward chemical releases triggered by orgasm) replaces all of that wide range of activities in the subtly and healthily erotic lead-up to normal human love-making with its sexualization of violence and extreme inequality between (or in more sickening cases among) sexual partners.

Is There Life After Porn? Is There Healing After Porn Addiction? Can I Get My Potential Back?

From here, there seem to be three courses an individual can take. One is to give up on real world sex and allow pornography to continue to completely dominate his sexuality, as many men do. Another is to introduce the sexualized violence of the pornography he enjoys into his real world sex life in order to arouse himself enough to achieve real-world penetration without all that healthy human sexuality which he finds so monotonous and boring, and another is to recognize the addictive cycle and the effects it is having on his mind, body and soul and to break that cycle. And for those unfortunate young men who have grown up with high speed internet pornography as their chief form of sexual education - if they think they like the toxic mimic of human sexuality; they should try the real thing - natural, healthy human lovemaking as it was meant to be and as it has been since the beginning of time.

The butterflies in the stomach, the warmth of intimate and gentle touching, the extreme excitement and allure of mutual attraction and mutual enjoyment; the ecstasy of giving and seeing first hand how much one’s gifts please and satisfy one’s partner. Healthy human lovemaking is a beautiful, incredible and wonderful thing to experience. I hope you get to try it someday, but first, you have to put down the pornography. Get rid of it. Associate it in your mind with hatred and degradation of women, men and all human beings. It’s corporate trash, stealing your full potential for enjoyment out of a big chunk of your life - because it’s not only your sex life that a pornography addiction impacts, it’s how you relate to fully half of the human population on planet earth. Put the pornography away for several months, and try making love again with a clear mind and curious spirit; and see where that takes you. I’m sure you young men out there will find some truly beautiful places that you never knew existed.

If you enjoyed this story, please comment below and let us know what you think!

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      Sanxuary 2 years ago

      I do not think porn is the problem but instead fuels the problem of people who have really sick issues. Some people can drink and not even do it again for a year and others start with a drink and end up on heroin in a year. With or without porn these monsters would have still ended up monsters. A lot of these predators are not in it for the sex, its for other reasons such as control. The reasons they do the things they do is rooted in very bad personality traits and morbid behavior that if even explained normal people would never understand.

    • Nadia Ribadu profile image

      Nadia Ribadu 2 years ago

      Hi Tyler,

      The vast majority of things I''ve written are stuck in my computer, poised to be sent to some entity or other. I'm working on my murder-mystery/romance novel, which I also have been working on forever. I tend to get stuck between my writing and other of life's activities, yet writing is my passion.

      I regret the one Hub I wrote because, in hindsight, it sounds xenophobic and bigoted, and I belong to a group that makes it highly ironic for me to be either.

      When I am in position, I will donate to your writing effort(s) on your site.

    • Tyler Funk profile image
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      Tyler Funk 2 years ago from Waterbury, Connecticut

      Hi Nadia,

      I wasn't saying you should go easier on Walt; it is good to be who you are in the world and to state without reservation what you really feel sometimes. In all honesty, though I hope he got distracted and isn't just intentionally disengaging with you after stating his own opinion on what he considers an important topic - and then bowing out as if his own analysis is the only one which matters and it can't possibly be improved upon through intelligent debate - I think that what I see as holes and gaps in his analysis and the unwillingness to seriously engage in this discussion shows that he probably has a habit of condescendingly speaking his mind and then disappearing without continuing in the debate. So, I hope you didn't take my comments as a suggestion that you take it easier on Walt. I actually agree with your sentiments about his participation in this conversation as well.

      Thank you for looking into my other writings. If you don't mind me asking, what was the hub you wrote a long time ago about; and why do you deeply regret writing it? Naturally, only answer that question if you feel comfortable talking about it; but god knows that I have written many things in the course of my life that I've regretted immensely after writing them, so I am just curious about what your hub was about. In any case, I'm glad you've stuck around and continued reading and commenting on hubs, even if you haven't written any hubs for a while - you're a great writer, with great clarity of thought and highly intelligent. Your comments here make that exceedingly clear. I hope if you do decide to write more hubs (or other types of pieces elsewhere) that you will let me know so I can check out some more of your ideas and your clear and concise writing style. Please do let me know if you have written other articles elsewhere!

    • Nadia Ribadu profile image

      Nadia Ribadu 2 years ago

      Thank you, Tyler, and I will read your other writings and look forward to your book.

      I see how people can get distracted. Sometimes, it's just that people have other things to do, so I should go easier on Walt. We all do have other things in our lives that take us away from writing. I know I do, which is why I wrote ONE Hub a long time ago, and it's one I deeply regret.

    • Tyler Funk profile image
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      Tyler Funk 2 years ago from Waterbury, Connecticut

      Nadia,

      I sure hope you're wrong regarding that thing about Walt, but I certainly see how and where it appears that way. Let's just hope he got distracted and forgot about the thread or something and doesn't just disregard your thoughts or opinions as thought they don't matter.

    • Tyler Funk profile image
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      Tyler Funk 2 years ago from Waterbury, Connecticut

      Hi Nadia,

      Yes, I am in fact writing a book extolling the virtues (or lack thereof), of pornography, and this Hub is actually but one small excerpt from that book. Here is more information about the book project I'm working on; http://www.gofundme.com/gxc4x4 as well as an opportunity to support my work on that project. And if you'd like to read some more excerpts from this book you can simply visit my profile on HubPages and all of the chapters I've published up until now are available on my profile page, and you won't have to sort through many off-topic articles as I believe I only have a total of around 20 Hubs including both on-topic and off-topic hubs.

      I agree about pornography being a political issue. I absolutely see it that way, and you do a good job of explaining why. A lot of things could be considered political when it comes right down to it; and when a topic is oppressive; especially when it is particularly oppressive of a particular social class of people - as pornography is of women - that topic becomes political; no matter how previously mundane or seemingly nonpolitical it may have seemed.

      In any event, thank you for your supportive comments and I hope you do check out some more of my work! I always really appreciate the readership since, as you'll see, sometimes my readers are fewer than I'd like to hope when I am writing a piece! It's very encouraging to feel like I have captured someone's attention, so thank you for letting it be known that I may have captured yours!

      All my very best,

      Tyler

    • Nadia Ribadu profile image

      Nadia Ribadu 2 years ago

      I suppose Walt is too "up there," too above me to respond to my thoughtful and worthy comments. Oh well. Speaks volumes.

    • Nadia Ribadu profile image

      Nadia Ribadu 2 years ago

      Hi Walt,

      I'm stuck on a couple of things you said in your last writing addressed to Tyler. I hope you welcome my response even though you weren't addressing me. I enjoy intelligent debate and adults civilly agreeing to disagree, without rancor.

      You said "there are important reasons to compassionately understand why people use pornography," and I embrace the rest of the sentence. Why is "compassion" necessary to understand such a thing? Regret for the wrongdoing, but compassion? Can't the same analogy be applied to someone who commits a far-more serious offense? When someone commits homicide, we wish to understand motives/reasons so as to determine why they lead to murder, not to understand them with "compassion," unless the perpetrator belonged to a vulnerable class (a developmentally-challenged or unstable person, a neglected youth, for example). Otherwise, there are circumstances in which compassion isn't appropriate, only punishment for the perpetrator of depravity. Pornographers as old as Ariel Castro, especially, deserved no compassion, even if we understand what led him to perversion and violence.

      Second, though I agree with you that "cultural critiques" don't solve the issue at hand, they cannot be overlooked either. It is glaringly obvious that we live in a pleasure-loving society in which too many contend that they're entitled to do and be whatever pleases, even at the expense of others. I think it is important to look at a profligate society, an environment in which it is argued that porn is a form of "free speech" (or freedom of expression) and permits easy access to it. If we didn't take freedom of expression to such extremes, we would have a less permissive society. We have reached a point in this country at which any and everything is allowed, rationalized, normalized, and legalized. Ergo, we shouldn't be surprised when unforeseen consequences arise from these "freedoms."

      Further, if you acknowledge "damages caused by pornography," then it is just as "smart" to look at causes, since cause virtually (if not always) always precedes effect.

      All the sciences mentioned have contributions to make regarding pornography, and no one is choosing one science over another. If anything, that's not the relevant point that should be made here. Tyler rightly alluded to cultural and scientific causes, without pitting one against the other as having greater significance. There's nothing wrong with taking a deeper look at issues from various perspectives, not just monolithically. Human behavior contributes to the human condition, and should be viewed from many angles.

    • Nadia Ribadu profile image

      Nadia Ribadu 2 years ago

      Hi Tyler,

      I only mentioned politics because in the main theme of pornography (hereafter, "porn") and its deleterious impact, one cannot separate it—or virtually anything else—from politics. Our friend, here, Walt, seems to suggest that the discussion has no political OR even cultural implications, or seems to intimate that these areas are secondary or only obliquely related to the issue of porn.

      In your opening piece, you began by stating the fact that Ariel Castro was steeped in porn, and you added his own admission. That's a social factor, in a culture in which porn is no longer underground but has become mainstreamed and is so very accessible. You can't even turn on regular TV without seeing people going at it, and cable goes even farther.

      When a sick man such as Castro, who has indulged in porn for a significant part of his life (a proclivity which probably began at a critical stage of his development), and then goes on to abduct and sexually assault three women, it affects society and is a commentary on society. What if he hadn't had the means and opportunity to be exposed to porn by his parents or guardians, or even at a newsstand?

      When law enforcement is called into the equation, it's political, since policing and law writ large are part of government, and government is, of course, political. It's often forgotten that law enforcement is part of government. When proponents of porn argue and even lobby on the side of it as a question of freedom of expression or free speech, it is inescapable that it is proper to discuss porn in the context of politics; not just when a pro or anti-porn-candidate runs for office.

      Ergo, it's untenable to maintain that we should keep porn in its own little box, as though it is only confined to and impacts those who indulge in it, because the problem of porn overlaps and dovetails into concerns about American/Western culture, politics, and what science and medicine contribute on the topic.

      I see that you are a man who is a feminist, and I applaud you. As a woman, I am a feminist on all economic, career and some social areas that interest feminists; but I stop short, because though feminists deny it, if it were to be taken to extremes, it would become male chauvinism feminine style; the same abuses by males would simply switch over. As I said in an earlier writing to you, many women today indulge in porn, too, as well as engage in emotionless, non-committal sex, the same way that men have since time immemorial. More and more women are molesting children in general and boys in particular than ever before. Feminism carried to extremes is often rank imitation (or me-tooism) of what has been typical of males, regardless of its moral or societal value. Sometimes, the notion of empowerment, if not tempered, only leads to lines and boundaries being crossed, and what we end up with is unintended consequences of what was deemed progress. I don't want to be a man or imitate the worst things about all too many men. I think women should be about elevating aspects of femininity that are useful to themselves and society, without reverting to naiveté or helplessness.

      With the takeover of both houses of Congress by the GOP this week, good luck with anything green progressing in the near term. They are pushing for the intensification of fracking and other abuses to our environment for profit. These are the same people who shut down the government, who have stymied this President in his every attempt to do anything that he set out to do, yet they were rewarded, testament to how short are the memory spans of Americans; unless they saw a value to all the obstructionism. But we'll see what happens. The result of every election leads to a backlash, and a backlash to the backlash, and on and on.

      Did you say you're working on a book on pornography? Good luck! Please let me know so that I'll be sure to purchase it, and if you're publishing by the traditional route and will be signing books in New York, I'll be one of the first in line.

    • Tyler Funk profile image
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      Tyler Funk 2 years ago from Waterbury, Connecticut

      Hi Nadia -

      In my opinion you could not be more right about the ailments of the two party system in our country. In my opinion there should be dozens of political parties - that would be a much truer form of democracy. A false choice between two bad choices is no choice at. I believe we need many more political parties and politicians to choose from during any given election; and the first party we need to add here in the US is the Green Party. It would also be nice to have some kind of heavily feminist party; and an affirmitive action party; especiallly a group representing the rights and interests of first nations people.

      I really could go on and on; and those aren't even the particular parties I would most want to vote for! I would consider myself a radical ecofeminist; it's just that those are the basic parties I believe we're missing. We really do have to broaden the currently very narrow range of what's acceptable political poliy

    • Tyler Funk profile image
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      Tyler Funk 2 years ago from Waterbury, Connecticut

      Hey Walt, please feel free to continue contributing; your input is very valuable to me! Regarding your second to last comment, you caught me! Sociology is definitely my favorite of all the sciences; however I do like to imagine that this fondness is not at the expense of my respect for the other sciences.

      Also, I hope you did not feel at any time that I was trying to put any specific political label on you; that was never my intention and I'm sorry if you felt at some point that I was trying to do that.

      I welcome you to continue with your helpful critiques and I hope we continue to mutually enjoy the conversation, along with Nadia as well, if she's still here (oops, I am just now seeing there is still a comment of hers I have failed to address! I better do that asap! Thanks to you both for your continuing feedback!

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      Walt Whitman1 2 years ago

      I have important and valuable ideas on this subject, have done research and written work on it at UCLA. I just wrote a long article here only for Hub pages to lose it. Let me know if you'd like to hear more that could help expand your covered book content.

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      Walt Whitman1 2 years ago

      I think misogyny and homophobia are directly relatable in some ways, which deserve in-depth exploration, but it's exclusionary at best to assume that the effects of pornography upon gay men are the same as the effects of pornography upon straight women. If you haven't queried gay men about pornography and how it has affected them, you haven't really examined issues of penetration and identification. For gay men who like to be penetrated, gay porn is a different experience for men that like to penetrate. Some would equate images of gay penetration as emasculating and therefore threatening to their ideas of sexual representation as though these images demonstrate an inherent inequality because all images of sexual penetration are demeaning. Many feminist interpretations of the inherent inequality and political imbalance in penetrative sexual images is not sufficient itself alone to represent the harms done by pornography. PS: I prefer not to be politically branded when I have something positive to contribute that has not been included in the conversation and that has not yet been considered. There are important reasons to compassionately understand why people use pornography AND why people need to be aware of the harms pornography causes. Cultural critiques do not solve or resolve these issues. It would be much smarter to include examining the damages caused by pornography from the perspective of all the sciences, not just the social sciences.

    • Tyler Funk profile image
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      Tyler Funk 2 years ago from Waterbury, Connecticut

      Walt, thank you for your input, and for voicing your concerns on this issue. I suppose there was no way for you to know this, but this hub is actually one in a series of hubs which I plan to eventually turn into a book on the subject of pornography. Within this book are several more chapters including "Pornography's Negative Impact on Women," "Pornography's Negative Impact on Children," Pornography's Negative Impact on the Homosexual Community," etc - and in each of these other sections I plan to include interview-style quotes from members of each of the groups involved; rather than pretending to know what everyone else's experience is like already.

      However, I appreciate your comments on this piece in particular, and I will in fact go back and add words like "straight" and "heterosexual" in key places to ensure I make it more apparent to readers that I'd like to acknowledge that men other than heterosexual men do in fact exist. Thank you for your input; I appreciate you sharing your concern.

      I also agree with Nadia when she points out that a person's sexual orientation does not necessarily make it necessary for pornography to impact that person in a different way than it would impact a straight person. Whether there are two same sex performers, or two opposite sex performers the messages about the conflation of sex and power and sex and violence are the same; and I do believe it remains true that as a class, women are far more targeted for debasement and degradation and outright sexualized violence than men are, in the platform of pornography; and I do believe it is important to name the players for whom they are - men, primarily as perpetrators of this abuse of violence as it exists in the world of pornography.

    • Nadia Ribadu profile image

      Nadia Ribadu 2 years ago

      Indeed, Tyler. And, of course, as you indirectly made clear, there is a political aspect to this social problem as well. Too many on the left, not just libertarians (who, as I understand it, consider themselves more closely allied with the GOP than the Dems), people who call themselves "liberal" and/or "progressive," are guilty of endorsing any and everything that people feel they have the "right" to do. They seem to condone vice, short of murder. When I malign pornography for its harmful nature, my liberal friends see red and we argue, because they seem to be of the opinion that, if it looks good, feels good, tastes good, etc., then have at it, because life is all about fun, pleasure, seizing life while we have it. Just as Republicans and conservatives only get their backs up when it comes to sexual morality, liberals only get upset when it comes to economic disparity. Both need to encompass more in their repertoires of norms and values that should be espoused.

    • Nadia Ribadu profile image

      Nadia Ribadu 2 years ago

      We, or I should say I, hear you. But the violence of pornography has no sexual orientation. No one spoke of the negativity of pornography in terms of hetero- or homosexuality. Pornography is deleterious regardless of the orientation of the producer or or consumer of porn, or the orientation of those depicted; whether the scenes or between heteros or homos. Porn is porn; porn is abusive, decadent, and has nothing to do with love or caring. It doesn't make for a better world. We've seen too many instances in which serial killers, as well as others, were steeped in porn. I believe you are bringing into the discussion another element, when we are saying that there are no redeeming features to pornography across the board, for ANYONE.

    • profile image

      Walt Whitman1 2 years ago

      As I have seen before in critical and research studies of pornography, men are referred to in such a way as all men are assumed to be heterosexual. The heterosexism involved could have been more understood in the 1980s when this research field began, however, more than 30 years later, it smacks of cultural elitism. Few communities have been more affected by porn than the LGBT communities. If you want to talk solely about pornography and its effects on the populations of heterosexual men and women, you should make that specifically clear, otherwise your discussions lack scientific rigor.

    • Tyler Funk profile image
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      Tyler Funk 2 years ago from Waterbury, Connecticut

      Well Nadia, I must say that I am thoroughly enjoying our conversation as well, even if we are the only two participants thus far.

      I agree with you 100% that the enjoyment males in this society find in pornography is culturally based. Porn has become entrenched in our culture, as has a profound sense of entitlement - which may be my way of referring to what you called "the pleasure principle." I think people have a sense of entitlement which extends everywhere from basic human rights, which I think people should feel entitled to - all the way to entitlement to immediate gratification. The problem with all of this entitlement is that it messes up our priorities so that, in the case of pornography for example - one group's sense of entitlement to something like the "immediate gratification" of watching another group get abused and degraded.

      This is kind of why the whole idea of anarchism doesn't work for me; at least not in its modern postmodernist form (I know, that sounds both contradictory and redundant at the same time; but you seem really well educated so I'm assuming you have some familiarity with postmodern theory). Basically what I don't like about postmodern theory is that it attempts to make everything basically meaningless. And when applied politically it gives people an excuse to say things like I have the right to enjoy BDSM if I want to - and completely ignores the rights of other people to be free of abuse and abusive situations. I have even seen anarchists defend pedophilia, saying "Well as long as there are two consenting parties the government has no business telling people what to do..."

      Romance, of course, is completely different than pornography. I don't mind romance at all, and in fact I think it's really positive and natural. I'm definitely not anti-sex; I just don't think that violence or the exercise of power have any place in sexual experiences. Conflating sex and violence is really prevalent in our society, and conflating sex and the exercise of power is the issue that rapists tend to have.

      I also totally agree that our society is on a downward spiral, morally speaking. I really dislike the libertarian or anarchist views being applied to everything, especially where they're totally inappropriate.

    • Nadia Ribadu profile image

      Nadia Ribadu 2 years ago

      Thank YOU, Tyler. I'm very much enjoying this conversation, which seems to be only between you and me, isn't it?

      I think that one possible reason that can be posited that men aren't gravitating away from pornography has much to do with our culture, our pop-oriented culture, in which the lives and behaviors of celebrities and even high-profile murderers are glamourized. Further, we live in a culture where gratification and immediate gratification is the norm; it never goes out of style in America, the desire to have and be whatever is in one's imagination. Pornography is just one more outlet for those who live by the pleasure principle. We have taken "life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness" to the stratosphere.

      'Liberated' women see pornography as their right to engage in as it has been engaged by men, unfortunately. Since they indulge in it, it's the same power trip for them that it has traditionally been for men. The dominatrix is the equivalent of the man who exploited women; the man is missionary in many of the fantasies, with the woman on top and otherwise very actively indulging. To me, it's sad and regrettable for ANYONE to enjoy pornography.

      What do you think of romance, which I can stomach? The difference between romance and pornography is said to be that romance leaves much to the imagination, while pornography leaves nothing to the imagination. Romance generally involves feelings of love and caring, whereas pornography is only about power and sex, graphically and erotically depicted. I'm still working on my novel in which there is romance. Though I attempt to keep it sufficiently spicy for my audience, I stop short of becoming graphic in preference of romance, and in order that I not detract from the central theme of two murders cases.

      In America, we've taken the concept of equality to new levels and applied apples-to-oranges analogies to justify it, which is why everyone believes that everything should be given free rein. The legalization of vice, in order to make everyone 'equal', or to give freedom to things that were hitherto prohibited or looked askance upon, is the current trend. I don't think things will ever revert to concern with morals and ethics (if such was ever the case). I think we're on downward spiral morally speaking, and the prevalence and acceptance of pornography, which has in general always been legal in this country, is one aspect of that downward spiral in my view.

    • Tyler Funk profile image
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      Tyler Funk 2 years ago from Waterbury, Connecticut

      Thank you Nadia, I couldn't agree more that this post could use a lot more activity, and that men as a social class would adopt these views on pornography much more widely. It is interesting what you say about women being into porn these days as part of their "liberation." That seems so strange given the actual nature of pornography and the way women are depicted in pornographic images as objects to be used and degraded. That doesn't seem like "liberation" to me, but I do agree with what you're saying about some people believing equality means that women should be doing what men are doing - and I have seen some of the less politically minded members of the lesbian community using and degrading their partners - at least verbally; I don't know what goes on behind closed doors - or adopting aspects of a BDSM lifestyle.

      To me, that's the more liberal analysis of equality. I prefer the radical analysis of equality; which I think has a much more developed sense of imagination when it comes to the possibilities for equality and what that might mean beyond giving women and other minorities an equal slice of the benefits of the oppression pie.

    • Nadia Ribadu profile image

      Nadia Ribadu 2 years ago

      I think this post should get a lot more notice and commentary. It was an excellent Hub! What I truly wish is that -- as I said before -- your view was taken to heart and acted on more wide. Many women, too, are heavily into porn these days. I suppose they feel that it's part of being 'liberated'. Everything that is typical of men, good or bad, women are supposed to do as well. That's the thinking, sadly.

    • Tyler Funk profile image
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      Tyler Funk 2 years ago from Waterbury, Connecticut

      Thank you, I'm glad it was appreciated! Through a little bit of activist networking I have found some other males who are critical of porn, but you are absolutely right, there should be far more of us than there are.

    • Nadia Ribadu profile image

      Nadia Ribadu 2 years ago

      Great Hub. It's very encouraging for a male (I take it by the name "Tyler") to take an adversarial position on porn. I wish there were more.