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16. Selling Cocaine

Updated on March 11, 2013
Photo by giovm92
Photo by giovm92 | Source

Selling Cocaine

Selling Cocaine is the continuation in a series of hubs in which I discuss my life of rebellion, dabbling in the Occult, drugs, crime and prison to life-changing conversion through Jesus Christ. Click here to read it from the beginning. In this hub, I will discuss experiences I had as a cocaine dealer.

Cocaine Connection

The city where I resided, was not known for having good quality cocaine. Meth—that was another story; although, that was even hit and miss. However, I got connected to some Mexicans who were smuggling cocaine to the Bay Area straight from Mexico; and the stuff was as pure as Alaskan spring water!

I dealt in quarter-kilos of it. I either got them fronted to me or bought them for $4,600. The first quarter-key I bought was sold that night! I didn’t expect it to go so fast; but by the time the night was over I had something like $6,500 in my pocket. I was amazingly shocked. Buying my quarter keys (9 ounces) for $4,600 meant that each ounce averaged out to $510. I would sell them for up to $700 each. I even had this one guy in San Francisco who would buy the whole quarter-key from me for $5,200. That was a quick $500 come-up. He would end up being the downfall of me, though.

Border Wars - Cocaine Seizure

No Price too High

A friend of my San Francisco connection was a regular when it came to buying ounces. I sold them to him for around $600. He was a DJ at a club. He liked to get super coked out; and he only wanted the high quality stuff. He would not settle for less, even if the price was lower.

Photo by molecularspillx
Photo by molecularspillx | Source

Cocaine Rash

There was another guy who I sold to that developed some kind rare illness from using cocaine. He ended up in the hospital because of it. He got some kind of red dots all over his body as a result. I discovered this after meeting him in a parking lot to sell him an eight ball. I said, “Are you crazy? You just sick off this stuff and you want to buy more?” He wouldn’t take no for an answer.

Once, I got ripped off by some guys. They came from Sacramento to buy some coke from me. I made two deals with them. The first time, I sold them a half-ounce for $400. They actually counted their money wrong and gave me an extra $100, which made my day. They came back some time later for an ounce, which I sold to them for $700. This is where they got me.

One of them met me in a parking lot late one night. He jumped into the back seat of my car. Next, he handed me the money and I handed him the coke. As soon as I handed him the coke, he jumped out of my car and disappeared. As I was counting the money, I realized it was fake! That’s when I jumped out of my car to go after him, with my gun in my hand; but he was nowhere in sight. I never saw him again.

Meet Your Doom

The guy that bought quarter-keys from me for $5,200 and ended up being my downfall bought crystal meth from me a couple of times too. Once, I sold him a half pound and made a quick $500. Unfortunately, it wasn’t good quality. He complained about it, so I told him I would sell him some good quality meth at cost the next time I got it. A short time later I got a pound for $9,500, which was pretty good quality; and he said that he would take it. It was supposed to be for his friend, who turned out to be an undercover DEA agent.

I met the two in a parking lot in Emeryville, CA. I really didn’t want my customer’s “friend” there, and I expressed that over the phone before going to make the deal; but after arriving there, the two of them met me together. Not thinking straight (I was up on meth for three days), I decided to go through with the deal. We did it in my customer’s friend’s car, a 2002 model Ford Mustang.

I had the dope inside of a cell phone box, sealed in a zip-lock bag. When my customer’s friend asked to see the it, I opened the top of the cell phone box and tilted it towards him so he could have a look inside at the white, crystally substance in the bag. I asked, “You got the money?” He replied, “Yeah. I just need to chirp my girlfriend on the phone so that she could bring it to me.” He then hit the two-way radio chirp on his Nextel cell phone, and immediately we were surrounded by the feds!

Photo by Riverh
Photo by Riverh | Source

Unpleasant Suprise

They came out of nowhere! Two carloads of them came to a screeching halt, one to the front and one to the rear of us; and they jumped out with their hand guns and assault rifles drawn on us. “Get out of the car, now!” they demanded. I threw the box of dope out of the window and we started filing out of the car. As we were stepping out, I was able to slide a handgun I was carrying from my waistband to under the passenger seat. However, they discovered it later and pinned it on me.

I scored a good connection on cocaine. At times, it was very profitable. At other times, people ripped me off and I lost out on some money. (This is getting pretty repetitive, isn't it?) I have seen people with serious cocaine addiction problems. What’s more, Someone I dealt cocaine to ended up setting me up with feds, and they arrested me in an undercover drug deal. In my next hub, I will talk more about my arrest and what prison conditions were like for me, and how the feds attempted to get me to cooperate with them for a drastically reduced prison sentence. Click on the link below to read on.

17. Inside County Jail

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    • DreKiss profile image

      Drea 5 years ago from Wisconsin

      This is great as a former inmate, I can definitely relate. I recently went through a drug court program to avoid a federal sentence. I look forward to reading more of your hubs.

    • X-Con profile image
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      X-Con 5 years ago from The Free World!

      DreKiss - Enjoy! And feel free to forward them to others :)

    • profile image

      Jared 4 years ago

      I live in Colorado....and i know Crystal meth is on a high demand here the state is consumed of it and I wanna hustle it as middleman, I don't wanna work for coorperate America barley making it

    • X-Con profile image
      Author

      X-Con 4 years ago from The Free World!

      Jared - I get so disappointed when I receive messages like this. Don't be so naïve. If you plant to hustle dope, be prepared to end up in prison or eve worse: dead.

    • profile image

      Diana 2 years ago

      My initial udearstdnning of recovery included the expectation that it is difficult to enter and to maintain. However, I did not fully realize the extent to which this is true. Dennis’ evaluation review findings, (that the average person requires 3-4 treatment admissions for 8-9 years to achieve a year of abstinence), struck me as daunting and have certainly shifted my approach to clients who are dealing with a relapse. Rather than seeing this hypothetical client’s relapse as a step backward, this article helped me consider it as a very normal struggle that is not separate from the process of recovery itself. Given this adjustment in my perspective, I imagine beginning with some work around the abstinence violation effect. To help this client, I would want to first explore the extent to which self-blame and perceived loss of control are impacting her own expectation about whether or not she can stop this downward spiral of relapse. My conviction that a return to recovery is possible for her is informed by so many of the readings we have completed this term. Sharing this conviction along with acknowledgement of the difficult road ahead would hopefully help us strengthen our alliance. From here we could begin to look at the circumstances contributing to her current use. We can re-identify risk situations and reiterate the benefits of utilizing other mental health and wraparound services. I would want to focus my interventions to emphasize areas that have been highly predictive of long-term abstinence rates such as: increasing her level of emotional support, teaching cognitive and behavioral coping strategies, and reviewing the psychological components of substance use such as her outcome expectancies. Perhaps most importantly, this week’s readings helped me think about this kind of session with less fear and apprehension and with an increased sense of the work that needs to be done.

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