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The Death of the 60's Generation Part One

Updated on March 6, 2013

“Where have all the soldiers gone?

Long time passing

Where have all the soldiers gone?

Long time ago

Where have all the soldiers gone?

Gone to graveyards every one

When will they ever learn?

When will they ever learn?”

Pete Seeger

An icon of a generation
An icon of a generation | Source

Pete Seeger

WELCOME TO THE SIXTIES AND THE SHOW THAT WILL NOT END

But it did now didn’t it?

The lyrics above are from one of the original protest songs,”Where Have All The Flowers Gone,” written in 1957 by Pete Seeger.

Come to think of it, where have all the protests gone? Burn, baby, burn! Down With Oppression!

Where have all the hippies gone? What happened to love, not war, and all you need is love?

What happened to those who swore they would protect Mother Earth, and who were determined to bring the Establishment down?

Well, I suspect, and this is just a hunch on my part, that they all joined the Establishment that they disliked so much.

And how sad is that?

The tie-dyed shirts were traded in for three-piece suits by Brooks Bros., and the cute little Beetle was junked in favor of a Lexus SUV. The tents they lived in got a little drafty over the years so now we find them living in Suburbia with 3,000 square feet of comfort, and the memories of change have slowly faded and been replaced by stock options and club memberships.

And how sad is that?

IT WAS INEVITABLE, WASN’T IT?

The harsh reality is that the Establishment is just too damn big, and it is based on consumerism and personal wealth. You either swim with the tide, baby, or you struggle against it, and it appears that most of the Love Generation is now letting the tide sweep them along into retirement and the 401K that awaits them.

Seriously, was there any real hope that they would succeed? There were gains to be sure. The Civil Rights movement had some wonderful successes, and Vietnam ended much sooner because of protests and mass movements for peace. Still, you look at the world today, fifty years after the first hippie traded in their Marlboro’s for some Columbian Gold, and it is hard to tell there once were millions who believed that peace and love could conquer war and greed.

The System, man, it is just too relenting and over-powering, and money does buy comfort and security, and wading through the mud and muck of Woodstock is all well and good if you are eighteen, but at sixty-eight the neon lights of Vegas look much more appealing.

And how sad is that?

Woodstock

DO YOU REMEMBER?

If you were alive during the 60’s, and you took part in the Great Experiment, then you remember vividly what it was like. Let your mind drift back to the bell-bottoms and mini-skirts. Take a deep breath and smell the scent of hope that was in the air. Listen for the sounds of the sidewalk musicians. Look back and see the innocence on the faces and the smiles directed at strangers. Remember what it was like to hitchhike across country in search of answers and rock concerts that lasted for days.

Do you remember? Can you conjure up the memory of intense meetings to discuss advancing world peace? Do you still fondly look back at the all-night parties on the beach, and having strangers crash at your crib and share a meal of friendship with you?

“Ask not what your country can do for you…ask what you can do for your country.” Millions believed those words, man, and they signed up for the Peace Corps and VISTA, and they ventured into the Deep South to help the poor, and everywhere they walked they spread a message of brotherhood and oh yes, love of one another.

They made advances, and the Establishment paid attention, and there was one brief, shining moment when it all seemed possible. White, brown, black and yellow, made no difference what color you were or what religion you believed in. The whole point, my friends, was acceptance, and getting along with each other actually grabbed a toe hold on society and oh it was so beautiful.

But then…..it slowly faded away, like some ethereal specter, now you see it, now you don’t, a wisp of sweet fragrance that dissipated and drifted off into the atmosphere never to be experienced again.

Gone!

Gone
Gone | Source

BUT WHERE DID IT GO?

How does an entire generation lose its driving force? Like most movements, it starts slowly and ends slowly as well. The momentum disappeared. Vietnam ended. Civil Rights became the law of the land. The vocal few who spearheaded the movement were either assassinated or faded into oblivion, and they were replaced by hucksters selling a better life. “Bigger is better” replaced “Love, not Hate,” and the smiles of innocence were given a nip and tuck and resembled wax museum characters.

Oh, you can still today find remnants of that once promising culture. There are still some artists, musicians and writers roaming around spreading the word, but for the most part they are ignored. Those who once sang of peace, the McCartneys and the Claptons, now sing for jeweled fans who are the only ones who can afford the concerts, and there is something grotesque about their efforts when the lifeblood of their music has been sucked dry by a corporate image.

Meanwhile, the bulk of the generation can be found watching the boob tube inside gated communities, sucking on a latte and talking about the good old days when “by damn you bet we made a difference in this world,” but not really believing their own words.

The Way We Were

A TIME AND PLACE NOW GONE

Now, like some old chief sitting in the Reservation telling stories to the young about warrior days, the Love Generation looks back fondly, and sadly, on a time and a place when it really did seem possible to change the world.

Where once there was hope, now we see apathy, complacency and growing cynicism. Where once there was a firm belief in peace on Earth we now find acceptance of a system that has steamrolled over us and left dreams in its wake.

And perhaps it is that way with every generation. The dreams of youth lose their edge, sanded down by the hard surfaces of fate and reality. Bye, bye, Miss American Pie, we drove our Chevy out of Shangrila and rented a place at the corner of Practicality and Inevitablity.

Where have all the flowers gone? They wilted, and died, along with our childhood dreams.

But….stay tuned for Part Two….THE LEGACY OF THE 60’S GENERATION

2013 William D. Holland (aka billybuc)

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    • old albion profile image

      Graham Lee 4 years ago from Lancashire. England.

      Bill I am tuned. I cannot wait for the part 2. Inspiring as usual. ''Peace man''

      Graham.

    • btrbell profile image

      Randi Benlulu 4 years ago from Mesa, AZ

      "We drove our Chevy from Shangrila and rented a place on the corner of Practicality and Inevitabilty." Doesn't that just sum it all up perfectly? Great hub, Bill! Anxiously awaiting the next installment!

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Graham, peace out, dude! Thank you my friend and I hope you are well.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Randi, I'm glad you liked that line....I was pretty fond of it. LOL Thank you! I'll see if I can't whip out the second part in a day or two.

    • Janine Huldie profile image

      Janine Huldie 4 years ago from New York, New York

      My mother grew up during this generation and she always says this that was such a great time in her life. So, I can honestly say it is quite depressing that it is gone and from all I heard would have loved to have known this time myself and not just from what I hear. Great article Bill and have voted up and shared as always!!

    • xstatic profile image

      Jim Higgins 4 years ago from Eugene, Oregon

      Wonderful Bill! Yep, that was a great line, as mentioned above. In Eugene, on Saturday Market/Farmer's Market day, incense is in the air, drummers drum, guitars are strummed, tiedyes are worn and sold, the looks and sounds of the 60s are back for a day a week. There is even a commune or two in the Coast range toward the coast. I suppose though that it all, like everything today has an edge of capitalism to it.

      Looking forward to the next installment!

    • Sheri Faye profile image

      Sheri Dusseault 4 years ago from Chemainus. BC, Canada

      I am a little too young to have been there, but I have been called a hippie many times in my life. I am looking forward to part two because I think many important and lasting changes came from that time. You sure do have a way with words Bill.

    • onegreenparachute profile image

      Carol 4 years ago from Greenwood, B.C., Canada

      Far out man! Cool hub.

      I spent the latter part of the sixties working in Banff, Alberta and living amidst the raw scenery of one of the most beautiful places on earth. I met bear and coyote on my walk to work and visited the Uncool Cellar for exotic tea and political conversation. It was the best time of my life. To this day I'm happiest amongst nature and away from city life.

      We're still here. We're just quiet now, knowing that in the end the establishment won.

    • carol7777 profile image

      carol stanley 4 years ago from Arizona

      How I miss the mini skirts and hot pants. Life was so different...And the 60s were considered so radical..Such a difference from the 50s. Good resurrection of that time in our lives. I do remember well along with the music...Great writing and I also look forward to part 2 and maybe part 3 and 4.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Janine, I can say without any hesitation that it was a very exciting time to grow up, and then to go to college. I'm sorry to see it gone....but....wait for part two. :) Thank you my friend.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Jim, I know the scene quite well in Eugene; it is similar to here in Olympia at the Evergreen State College...there are little pockets like that all around the country.

      Anyway, thank you my friend.

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      Liz Davis 4 years ago from Hudson, FL

      I wasn't around for the 60's (and I've been told on more than one occasion that I was born too late), but I know what you're talking about. One of the things that I find discouraging is the number of people who started companies to promote the cause of organics and clean foods, only to compromise their beliefs and/or sell out to corporate giants. Companies like Cascadian Farms have been around for decades (they started as a movement), and the only time I hear them speak up about anything is when they're promoting their product. Sorry to be pick on one company--I still buy Cascadian Farms when I splurge on frozen berries--but it's true. What are these industry giants doing to improve standards? I'd like to see them push more information out to the public and spend more time in Washington, but instead the action is always at the grass roots level by people with less power and resources. This is only one issue, but it's one that's near and dear to my heart.

      And by the way, I took a deep breath as you instructed. I had no idea hope had such a skunky smell. ;-)

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Sheri, I happen to agree with you....thus part two. And if you have been called a hippie then I would love to meet you. :) Thank you!

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      onegreen yes, we are still here, and most likely the establishment did win, but.....wait for part two. :) Thank you!

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Carol, it was the most exciting times of my life but still, I feel sadness when I think of all the goals and hopes and dreams....still....part two. :) Thank you my friend and have a great day.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Oh Lizzy, I would have walked into fire with you by my side. You were made for that decade but sadly you were late to the party. Skunky smell? LOL See what I mean, you should have been there.

      I understand what you are saying and I do believe many companies sold out in the name of profit, and that is an arrow through the heart of the 60's movement.

      Thanks Lizzy! Now go put your tie-dyed shirt on.

    • lrc7815 profile image

      Linda Crist 4 years ago from Central Virginia

      Kindred, I feel your pain. Like you, I have questioned the changing times and climate. As a participant in that 60's idealism, there have been times when I wondered if I was an alien, the only one of my friends who remained true to those values and still believed we could change the world. This is what I have concluded.

      We didn't vanish. Some of us joined the establishment but many have not. What happened is they successfully divided us, thus, reducing the volume of our voice. We are still out here but we dedicate our time and energy to specific issues rather than the umbrella of "world peace". Many of the musicians are gone, victims of the drug culture or free love. But many are still using their voice (ie Arlo Guthrie, Jackson Browne, Magpie, Neal Young) to bring awareness to peace and conservation of the earth's resources. Many months ago I wrote a hub about socially conscious music and its relativity to the issues today.

      The unknown faces of the 60's (people like us) are still doing their thing in the name of equality, human rights, etc. but our audience is smaller. Movements still crop up occasionally, like Idol No Mor or Occupy but are spread across the country in small groups and don't get the media attention of the old civil disobedience or festival gatherings (Woodstock) of the 60's.

      As Joan Baez and Bob Dylan said to us, the times they are a'changin' and wwee have changed with them. But...we have not vanished or been silenced. Keep the faith my friend. God's not done with us yet.

      Great hub my friend.

    • cheaptrick profile image

      cheaptrick 4 years ago from the bridge of sighs

      Yes,it seems the turn on tune in and drop out folks have all but disappeared as well.I think a new[small]generation of off grid truly free people are continuing on though.Only these kids are using an individual approach to gaining their freedom.They seek a new society on the down low...under the radar so to speak.Good for them,may their movement succeed.Great hub,got me a little emotional there.:).

    • Elias Zanetti profile image

      Elias Zanetti 4 years ago from Athens, Greece

      The Sixties had a big impact on the world's attitudes and ideas even if they didn't quite changed the world as they promised! :)

      Anyway, I think it's a fascinating time for history lovers, probably the most interesting decade of the last century.

      Thanks for this presentation, looking forward to read the next part.

    • Mr Archer profile image

      Mr Archer 4 years ago from Missouri

      I remember seeing my first "hippie" as a child of maybe 6 or so in Missouri. This guy wandered into our church one Sunday morning, bell bottom jeans, tye-died shirt and hair down to his waist. He was as nice as could be, and stayed around for several weeks. But the older "elders" refused to welcome him, and eventually he got the picture and left. I never understood why they felt that way. As an adult, now I understand the threat they felt. Don't agree with it; but I do understand it.

      Great look back and I am ready for the followup!

    • Jools99 profile image

      Jools99 4 years ago from North-East UK

      Bill, what a great read. I was only 7 when the 60s came to a close so my experience is not yours maybe! I do think them60s represented a sea change in terms of its zeitgeist but as you discuss here - what happened? I think we all have to grow up and in general most of us do and we get taken along with our needs to survive and forget not having anything to worry about and having fun. We can't stay young forever but it is a shame that those 'hard edges' you talk about eventually wear us down!

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Oh Linda, I keep the faith. You have to be patient and wait for Part Two. Like anything worth savoring, one has to appreciate the build-up before tasting the sweetness of the experience. I understand what you are saying and we'll get to that in part two. :)

      Thank you my fellow rebel. No, God is not done with us yet.

      bill

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      cheaptrick, I agree with you that there is a new generation, and there is much more social awareness today, and all of that will be covered in part two. Thank you for a great comment.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Elias, I agree completely with what you wrote. That decade did have a huge impact on the attitudes and ideas, and changes happening today are because of the 60's. I'll cover all that in the next installment.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Mike, my dad did not appreciate the changes during the 60's. In fact, he hated it. LOL It's probably just as well that he died in 1969 in that respect.

      Thanks, buddy, and I'll have that followup out in the few days.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Julie, they seem to wear down everyone now don't they? Still, the change that was asked for during the 60's is apparent today if we look close enough. I'll talk about that in the next installment. Thanks for your insightful comment.

    • Eiddwen profile image

      Eiddwen 4 years ago from Wales

      Brilliant Billy another wonderful read.My era was in the 70s and my mind has just recovered from a trip down memory lane !!!Did I really do all those things Ha haha!!!

      Thank you again my dear friend.

      Eddy.

    • profile image

      mjkearn 4 years ago

      Hi Sir Bill

      So the sixties are dead. Well I'm glad somebody told me. I thought they seemed to be going on for a while. Good show as now I'll start on the 70s.

      Love the Beetle pic as you'd expect but orange. Really Orange. You can't have orange and expect to come to the land of green.

      Really Sir Bill who's your editor.

      Great job as normal and just to bug you more I'm sharing this.

      Looking forward to Part-2.

      MJ.

    • billybuc profile image
      Author

      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Oh Eddy, most definitely we did all those things. LOL It's amazing we survived.

      Thank you dear lady. I hope you had a wonderful day. It must be about dinner time there.

      love,

      billy

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      MJ, you never fail to make me laugh. Orange and green just will not do. :) I'm glad you enjoyed this and listen, you can still wear tie-dyed shirts if you want. Now they call it retro!

    • profile image

      DJ Anderson 4 years ago

      I was born and raised in a very small town. I was a little too young to understand what was going on. The TV brought the restless crowds right into our living room, with the nightly news. The world seemed to be in violent chaos with war and protests and assassinations. I could not make any sense out of all the craziness. The thing I remember most were young solder boys coming home in body bags.

      It seems odd that so many comments from your readers refer to those times as "the good times". There were very few 'good memories' for me.

      Bill, I think you have done a splendid job with this write. I enjoy your works and appreciate that you have shown the 60's in a different light.

      Thanks,

      DJ.

    • suzettenaples profile image

      Suzette Walker 4 years ago from Taos, NM

      Bill, what a fabulous article. You articulate the 60's so well. I do well remember it. What happened? Just as you said, this generation caved and conformed to the establishment they fought so hard against in their youth. What great memories in this hub. I so enjoyed reading it! Sorry, I have been gone from HP for a time - I have been back substitute teaching these last few months. I know, what's wrong with me?

    • poetvix profile image

      poetvix 4 years ago from Gone from Texas but still in the south. Surrounded by God's country.

      I'm highly interested to read part two. I have to wonder if the spirit of the 60's is reawakening in the youth of today, some of them. Last week I had a knock at the door. It was a huge young man advocating most vehemently for my support for his crusade against electronic waste. This dude was committed. He wasn't getting paid either. His pitch was heartfelt and he was fired up big time. This generation of youngsters are largely lost, but not all. Perhaps, articles such as this will rekindle the fire that smolders within them. As per the norm, you hit another one out of the park!

    • stephhicks68 profile image

      Stephanie Hicks 4 years ago from Bend, Oregon

      Love the songs and the feelings they invoke from the 60s. I was "there" for the last couple of years of the decade, but my experiences are largely drawn from stories and photographs (even some video!) of my aunts and uncles. There was such hope on their faces back then!

      Great hub - looking forward to Part 2! Best, Stephanie

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      DJ, thank you! It was a fascinating time and there was a great deal of pain and I remember that pain well. There was also great excitement and a feeling that great things could be accomplished. Sadly I see that missing today on a large scale. I still have hope. :)

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Suzette, I don't know whether to congratulate you or laugh. :) I'm glad you are back. I saw a new hub with your name on it pop up, so I'll be over shortly to read it. Welcome back and thank you!

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Poetvix, you are a shining example that the spirit of the 60's is not done, and I think you will see that in the second part of this article. I do believe great things were accomplished during that time, and I think we still see signs of it alive today. I always want more....more....more....but all in all I am encouraged by what I see.

      Thank you my friend. I would have loved to have talked to that man at your door.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Steph, exactly, there was such hope in the faces. My hope was shattered when RFK was killed...something died inside of me that day in Los Angeles.

      Thank you and I hope you are feeling better.

    • MsDora profile image

      Dora Isaac Weithers 4 years ago from The Caribbean

      I sing Pete Seeger's lyrics all the time (didn't know who wrote them). Thanks for helping to keep the era --and the values--alive by having us reminisce about them. Enjoyable!

    • watergeek profile image

      watergeek 4 years ago

      We didn't disappear and we didn't cave in. Not all of us. We learned to act on our beliefs - quietly in our own lives, influencing those around us. My sister grows organic food in her backyard and she taught her kids well. One musician brother is moving into alternative journalism. Another still sings Beatles songs and writes his own along a similar vein, spreading love in the church he goes to. One brother teaches the tough kids at his school and is well respected for his affection and discipline. OK, one brother caved, but he wasn't really in it in the first place. He designs software for submarine weaponry.

      I work in water conservation, run an environmental nonprofit, and write articles promoting earth friendly living. There are lots of other environmental and alternative nonprofits around here too. I've belonged to the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC) for years, which is a highly successful legal nonprofit started by 60's people, and the African Wildlife Foundation, another successful nonprofit started by 60's people. Then there's Democracy Now! a successful alternative news agency. And Green America (used to be Coop America) sourcing organic American goods.

      In April my group is organizing a press conference with the mayor, city reps, and nonprofits to discuss how we're working together to make our city sustainable. We 60's people haven't disappeared. You'll find us in nonprofit work and in modern protests lending seasoned advice (Occupy, 350.org, MoveOn). It's just that action is quieter than words.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      watergeek, I agree completely, and that is the message in the second part. Thanks for the insightful comment and you'll see a reflection of this in the next hub. Your comment is the whole point of this two-part article.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      MsDora, thank you. I will always sing the praises of the 60's. Those values need to be kept alive, now more than every before.

    • bdegiulio profile image

      Bill De Giulio 4 years ago from Massachusetts

      Great walk down memory lane Bill. I was just a kid in the 60's and I do remember all of the movements and flower power but as I was just a kid I was too young for any of that. But, your point is well taken, every generation seems to eventually succumb to the inevitable rat race. The establishment is called just that because it doesn't appear to be going anywhere anytime soon. Can't wait for part 2.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Bill, you missed out on a great deal of excitement. Thanks for stopping by and I'm glad you enjoyed this. You are right about the establishment...it's here for a reason. :)

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      Maria Magdalena Ruiz O'Farrill 4 years ago from Borikén the great land of the valiant and noble Lord

      I was born in 1958. This written here is part of who I am today. Thanks for sharing. Many kids these days think that we do not know what life is about. I love volkys, it was on one of them that I learned how to drive.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Maria, it is definitely part of who I am today. I love VW's too but I never owned one.

      Thank you my friend.

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      Rosemary Sadler 4 years ago from Hawkes Bay - NewZealand

      Those days... we really did think we could change the world. I guess we took on responsibilities and kids became our priorities, raising a family and ensuring the security of that family left us little time to change the world. But I think we did make some big differences.

      Awesome hub Bill. Can't wait for part 2

    • Curiad profile image

      Mark G Weller 4 years ago from Lake Charles, LA.

      Well written and a great set of memories. I was young then, but lived the life, and fought the fights right along with my brother and his aged friends. I remember the club in San Francisco I played guitar at on Wednesdays, and after the music going upstairs to the "Drug" Store" and stocking up for the week. As a matter of fact, Jerry Brown was known to frequent that drug store!

      Can't wait for part two!

      Mark

    • Peggy W profile image

      Peggy Woods 4 years ago from Houston, Texas

      I well remember my brother and I strumming guitars and singing that song "Where have all the flowers gone." That was prior to him and my other brother going to Vietnam. I remember the 1960's well though I never went to Woodstock, took drugs nor burned my bra. The Civil Rights movement was in full swing and President Kennedy was assassinated. Some searing moments in history and memory to be sure! Quite a departure from the 1950's! Will look forward to part 2.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Rosemay, I think we changed the world too, and that is the focus of part 2. Thank you!

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Mark, I worked backstage at the Filmore the summer of 1968...not a bad way to make some extra cash. LOL Thanks for sharing your memory buddy!

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Peggy, I was just plain lucky or I would have ended up in Vietnam and then all bets are off whether I would be here writing this now. You didn't burn your bra? LOL Thank you my friend.

    • lrc7815 profile image

      Linda Crist 4 years ago from Central Virginia

      Patience...ha! It may be a virtue but I skipped school the day they were handing it out. lol

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      There is actually method to my madness, Kindred! Check your mail in a few days. I'm sending you some patience c.o.d. of course. LOL

    • rajan jolly profile image

      Rajan Singh Jolly 4 years ago from From Mumbai, presently in Jalandhar,INDIA.

      Reality bites, my friend! But waiting for the change!

      Have a wonderful day.

    • always exploring profile image

      Ruby Jean Fuller 4 years ago from Southern Illinois

      I wish John Lennon could read this, he would love it. This is one of your best, taking me back to the days of believing, makes me sad thinking how we all changed........

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Rajan, that is a succinct summary...reality bites! LOL Thank you for that.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Ruby, thank you. I remember thinking anything is possible, and that huge changes were going to happen. Well, I guess they did, but it took fifty years. Sometimes change takes its own sweet time.

    • RoryColgan profile image

      RoryColgan 4 years ago from Louisville, Kentucky

      As part of the Y generation, I commend the work that was done in the 60's and 70's. Perhaps, just perhaps, the establishment will always continue to grow like a cancer in the body.....Maybe the 60's were a LSD radiation that did some good, but didn't cure the issue. Perhaps, if this is true, our great machine still has years left before love replaces war....As for me, I believe that education, and not government education, is the cure. I dedicate myself to revealing my ignorance and aiding others to do the same.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Rory, as a former teacher I completely agree with you about education. Thank you for a very insightful comment.

    • AliciaC profile image

      Linda Crampton 4 years ago from British Columbia, Canada

      This is an interesting hub, Bill, but it's also a sad one. I'm looking forward to part two!

    • Faith Reaper profile image

      Faith Reaper 4 years ago from southern USA

      Groovey Bill,

      I was a small child in the 60's and then a teen in the 70's, and I do remember the bell bottoms and mini skirts . . . you should see some photos back then! Good memories. I remember writing and drawing on my notebook in school, in bright colors, the big Peace signs and multi-colored flowers, just as is shown on the VW Beetle. I wrote "Peace" or "Flower Power" but I don't know what that meant. I really did love all the music back then. Love those lyrics you started this hub with . . . and now a song popped into my head for some unknown reason and kind of out there one/fun one . . ."Jeremiah Was a Bull Frog . . . was a good friend of mine . . . " LOL

      Thanks for the memories of a whole different era, and it is sad no doubt.

      Hugs , love, and peace, Faith Reaper

    • Mhatter99 profile image

      Martin Kloess 4 years ago from San Francisco

      Thank you for this. I was here! San Francisco

    • Ericdierker profile image

      Eric Dierker 4 years ago from Spring Valley, CA. U.S.A.

      Buddy it sounds so ok, but it is not. I think HOW may bring back some of the brotherhood with all peoples.

      I struggle each day with the principles of that time, I find no error there. I find error in me.

      But I have instilled as have the mother's of my children that morality that requires less consumption and more Love.

      Maybe just maybe our children saw the hearts of our being and will carry forward. I pray they do not focus on our hypocrisy.

    • Rolly A Chabot profile image

      Rolly A Chabot 4 years ago from Alberta Canada

      Hi Billy... Once I spotted the title and saw the VW Bug I had to move in like a snake on a mouse. Now consider this, a small town Prairie boy arriving at the greatest party ever held. An old beat up Hippy Van, very nieve and yet seeking adventure and adventure was what I found.

      I was fed clothed and loved upon like nothing I have ever seen. I discovered two things during my time at Woodstock. First was my van could sleep two or it could sleep eight. Food was found in the love that filled the air along with just about anything that created a blue haze over the area. People, total and complete strangers would simply give because they could. It was a movement that seemed to last forever. An experience I think that started me on the path of truly loving others.

      Free love, free speech against the establishment that had been in control far to long. Oh yes lets not forget the burning of the Bra... Girl power was amazing.. We had a voice, we used it and the change started to happen. Who were we... just a bunch of kids that were seeking.

      Did we do OK after all the smoke had cleared, yes we did. It was then that lawyers and psychiatrists made their fortune.

      I loved this "Heh Man you got me all fired up now." Of course that might be all the drugs I am taking to beat this stupid cold... lol

      Love you Man

    • pstraubie48 profile image

      Patricia Scott 4 years ago from sunny Florida

      This was my time, too, Bill. And what a time it was. Free this and free that...boobies in the breezes and all. College was a roller coaster ride and sorrow crept in. Several of my classmates over dosed and died on this drug or that one. But it did not seem to shake the resolve of those who were still using to keep on doing so. Kind of a "it won't get me" belief and the idea that LSD made them 'see more clearly.'

      For the most part though it was a time of few concerns and everyone wanted to be a part of it.

      Leaving that now to the young who come after us...to let them rise up and have their voices heard...perhaps that is where it has gone..passed on in hopes they can do better than we did???

      Awesome as usual...I will be back..

      Angels are on the way to you all today :) ps

    • Gypsy48 profile image

      Gypsy48 4 years ago

      This hub brought back many memories as I was a young woman in the 60s. Times have changed. The song "Blowin in the Wind" comes to mind. Another great hub Bill, looking forward to part two.

    • Monis Mas profile image

      Aga 4 years ago

      When I was younger, I often felt I should have been born earlier and been a child of the 60-s :-). Interesting read, Bill!

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      It is a bit sad, Alicia, but the second part will be happier. Thank you!

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Faith, I used to sing Jeremiah to my son at bed time.....and he grew up listening to the Beatles. Poor kid never had a chance. LOL Thank you as always for your visit.

      blessings and love, today and always

      bill

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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Martin, I spent the summer of 1968 in San Francisco. Great times!

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Eric, that is the theme of part two....maybe the legacy of the 60's does still live on in our children. We can always hope, right?

      Thank you my friend.

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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Rolly, I did not make it to Woodstock, but I did make it to Monterrey, and that was an experience I will never forget. There was a great deal of love back then, and freedom as you said.....and the exact opposite in a great deal of hate and anger against us. I think we did do okay after the smoke cleared. You can find the 60's everywhere today if you look closely.

      Thank you buddy and love to you from Olympia.

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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Perhaps, PS, that is where it has gone. YOu will have to wait for part two to find out. :) Thank you my dear. Those were the days my friend, we thought they would never end.

      hugs and blessings,

      bill

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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Gypsy, blowin in the wind for sure.....is it still alive? I think so, and I'll tell you my thoughts on that in a few days.

      Thank you my friend.

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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Monis, it's funny you said that. I have several friends who are quite disappointed they didn't' live back then, and they would have been perfect for that era...but perhaps that is the legacy of the 60's?

      Thank you!

    • phoenix2327 profile image

      Zulma Burgos-Dudgeon 4 years ago from United Kingdom

      The 60s was such an exciting era. I was at a very impressionable stage then and Vietnam, Flower Power and of course The Beatles shaped who I am today. I still believe in the dreams and hopes of the 60s. If one person still believes, can the 60s and what it represents really die?

      I don't believe so.

      Wonderful hub, Bill. It made me very nostalgic.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Phoenix, I do not believe so either, and that is what part two will be about my friend. :) Thank you and have a wonderful weekend across the Pond.

    • LKMore01 profile image

      LKMore01 4 years ago

      Looking forward to part two, Billy! The sixties must have been like the great American Renaissance with the modernization of birth control, greater economic freedom for women and the voices of the younger generation being heard around the world. The music alone was revolutionary.

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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      LK, it was easily the most exciting time of my life. There was so much going on. It seemed like daily there was a major event, and the changes that happened were unbelievable.

      Thank you again for the visit. I hope you are well.

    • DDE profile image

      Devika Primić 4 years ago from Dubrovnik, Croatia

      Most informative and I found this Hub to be interesting.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thank you DDE; I'm glad you found it to be so.

    • bravewarrior profile image

      Shauna L Bowling 4 years ago from Central Florida

      OMG, I so relate to this hub, Bill. I posted a hub many moons ago called "Where Has Our Voice Gone?" and it relates totally to this subject of speaking out for ourselves. I am a Flower Child at heart and always will be. I so wish we would revert to the days of speaking up for ourselves and having a voice! What do we speak about now? Do we speak about anything important and are we loud enough for the world, or our country to hear? Maybe we should all gather 'round and smoke the peace pipe and "Come Together"!

    • Glimmer Twin Fan profile image

      Glimmer Twin Fan 4 years ago

      Sad but true Bill. I was born in the mid 60s so this isn't really my age frame, but I used to go to a lot of Dead shows in the 80s and had some friends who "followed" the band. I think most of them had parents who were once hippies but who now were a big part of the establishment. Their kids carried on their own form of activism by living on the trust funds that their parents gave them.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Sha, I remember that hub of yours. Let me know when you get a crowd together around the campfire and I'll be there. :) Thank you my dear and have a great Sunday.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Glimmer, I don't know why but your comment had me laughing....a sad laugh for sure. I'll have the next part of this hub out by Tuesday and reveal where all of the hippies seem to have gone. :) Thank you!

    • Patriot Quest profile image

      Wayne Joel Bushong 4 years ago from America

      Groovy hub my man! Fun reading! Made me get in the actic and now I'm wearying my orange sunglasses with my baggy sychodelic shirt on! I plugged in my old black light but it wont come onj! Did find pics of my van with the little window on the back and the marijuano bumper sticker leaf!..........great reading!

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Patriot, hold onto that bumper sticker. It will be a classic one day. :) Thank you for the visit and the great comment...part two tomorrow.

    • Jamie Brock profile image

      Jamie Brock 4 years ago from Texas

      Bill, I went through a phase where I actually grieved ( I mean REALLY grieved) that I wasn't around in the 60's. Oh all of the wonderful tales I heard.....Sounds like such a wonderful place in time. Oh well. I doubt there will ever be another decade like that one but at least I can dream :)

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Jamie, when I look around at the complacency in society today, I cannot imagine there ever being another generation like the 60's....but yes, we can always dream.

      I hope you are well my friend. If you ever want to chat you know how to reach me. :)

    • tillsontitan profile image

      Mary Craig 4 years ago from New York

      "When will they every learn, when will they ever learn?" Each decade has its rebels, the twenties had its flappers, the fifties rebellious teenagers and rock'n roll and of course there was the sixties. We can only hope the fight for right never dies...the way its done maybe, but not the fight itself. Free love and no war....of course that's what we want, but we know too someone's gotta work ;) Keeping the sixties alive is something we do in our hearts....like your hub can keep it alive in people's minds. Freedom! Freedom from war, freedom from famine...freedom!

      Voted up, useful, and interesting.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Mary, I agree with you completely. The fight is never over as long as injustice remains. Thank you my friend; part two was just posted if you want to see it.

    • Jamie Brock profile image

      Jamie Brock 4 years ago from Texas

      Thank you,Bill.. I do look forward to chatting with you.. and hopefully soon :)

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Anytime, Jamie! I would enjoy that.

    • Gypsy Rose Lee profile image

      Gypsy Rose Lee 4 years ago from Riga, Latvia

      Terrific hub. Brought back lots of memories. I was born at the awkward stage in 1957. Too young to be a part of the '50s and they were drawing to a close and then too young to be a part of the 60's movers and shakers. That left me the 70's on up but it was those two generations worth of music I came to enjoy a lot and of course learned about what I had missed in school. Thanks for taking me back. Passing this on.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Gypsy, I was lucky! I entered my teen years just as the decade began, and went through high school and college during that decade. A great coming of age for me.

    • teaches12345 profile image

      Dianna Mendez 4 years ago

      Bell bottoms and mini-skirts, now there's a memory. I lived in my bell bottoms! These years hold some good memories and ideals of what a society should be -- in an ideal world. Great post and can't wait for part 2.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Dianna, it was a wonderful time to be a teen....so much to do, and see, and experience. I am glad I witnessed it firsthand. Thank you my friend.

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      Justsilvie 4 years ago

      As always Bill, your Hubs make one think.

      I remember all the changes in the sixties and being an Army brat made me think the whole world was changing very fast...I thought COOL this world is going to be a wonderful place full of people who won’t see skin color or other differences. Then I moved away from my parents and realized how much they had sheltered us from the real word.

      I don’t see the present as such a horrible place, along with all our short comings; I also see the progress we made, even though there are those who would like to drag us back screaming.

      I also see many of the Baby Boomers my age addressing it with the same exuberance they had in the sixties and discovering that we still have a chance to continue working on the causes we may have put on back burner while living our lives.

    • tobusiness profile image

      Jo Alexis-Hagues 4 years ago from Bedfordshire, U.K

      Billy, now you're smoking!!.....my time was the tail end of the sixties, more a child of the seventies, but I remember the air of excitement and hope, the protest songs, heated discussion with students so passionate about changing the world for the better. Well... maybe they did change it, but not necessarily for the better.

      Some where along the line we seem to have lost the plot.

      Looking forward to part two, thanks for the ride down memory lane, it's fun looking back :}.

    • Steel Engineer profile image

      Steel Engineer 4 years ago from Kiev, Ukraine

      The 60's generation led the way to sexual lasciviousness and broad immorality. They hacked at the righteous roots of this nation. I am glad to see them go. Let their memory forever be one of a corrupted people.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Justsilvie, there was a definite air of excitement back then, but I agree with you that the Baby Boomers, for the most part, still believe they can change things for the better, and that is a hopeful sign.

      Thank you and I'm glad you enjoyed this look back in time.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Jo, I am not smoking! LOl I do believe many lost the plot as you say, but I would hope that the 60's would be looked at fondly as a time of great change and hope.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Steel Engineer, thanks for weighing in with your opinion. I don't agree with you but I respect your opinion.

    • L.L. Woodard profile image

      L.L. Woodard 4 years ago from Oklahoma City

      Almost ashamed to admit it, but the nostalgia your words brought forth moved to tears of grief. I was a youngster in the 60s, a teen in the 70s and remember so well the collective plans for the future.

      The establishment, the machine that is the government, became so effective at dousing out the flames and embers of the generation's forward movements that when protests such as Occupy Wall Street occur, they are rapidly silenced and nullified.

      Great hub; voted up and Shared.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      L.L., I thought the same thing when the Occupy Movement happened. The Establishment is just too damn big and I'm not sure we will ever again see a time like the 60's. Thank you for that insight.

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      Jim Higgins 4 years ago from Eugene, Oregon

      Reading these comments triggred some well-loved lines and voices from those days. "Hello darkness my old friend, I've come to talk with you again..." The Sounds of Silence from 1964, the genius of Simon and Garfunkel. We've had a lot of darkness and half-light since then.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Jim, right on! I loved that song...well, still love it. :) There has been a great amount of darkness since those words were written. I think it's about time for some sunlight, don't you? :) Thanks buddy!

    • tonymead60 profile image

      Tony Mead 4 years ago from Yorkshire

      Billy,

      I don't think it's all doom and gloom as many of your followers here write. The essence of the sixties is still about in places. The music of those days still hangs in the air and still sets the standard.

      Steel engineer obviously was not there nor does he understand that it was a time of casting off the yoke of oppresion that had gripped the west in the osteer years after the WWII. It was a way of letting down your hair for many countries.

      here in GB our TV had far stricter censorship in the sixties than now, when the F word is in abundance since the invasion of films from the USA nade it popular.

      Life now and then is what you make of it, I was a teenager in the 60's and loved the Beatles the Rolling stones and the hundreds of bands that made fantastic music. The Pinball Wizard still rules!!

      regards

      Tony

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Thanks for your perspective, Tony! Life is only gloom and doom if you choose to see it that way, so I agree with you. Unfortunately, there are a great many people who see it that way. Read part two and you'll see how I really feel about the 60's.

    • Paul Kuehn profile image

      Paul Richard Kuehn 4 years ago from Udorn City, Thailand

      Billy,

      This is a great hub and having spent my youth and young adulthood during the 60s, I really enjoyed reading this article. I never was a flower child or took part in demonstrations because I was first too busy attending to my college studies, and then serving in the Navy during the latter half of the decade. I do remember feeling extremely proud being an American and having the chance to keep the world safe from Communism while being stationed on Taiwan and in Japan. I think the tragedy of the Vietnam War played a big part in the death of the 60s generation mentality. I really look forward to reading and commenting on Part 2 of this series! Voted up and sharing with followers and on Facebook. Also Pinning and Tweeting.

    • chinared profile image

      Just call me, Rick 4 years ago from Asia, and all over

      Being a ten-year-old in the 60s, I was a bit young to quite understand it all and I tried to live my own life with my friends. I do however know exactly what I was doing when Kennedy got shot, and when Apollo 11 landed on the moon. I remember driving ever so cautiously through a riot, curled up in the backseat of our Corvair, and visiting San Francisco Hade & Ashbury, at the park with my grandma.

      I have more memories of events from the 60s than any period of my life. MLK; Beetles; Elvis; Vietnam protestors; Manson killing; and the list goes on. Great article, voted up, interesting, and beautiful.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Paul, thank you for stopping by and thank you for serving this country in the Navy during Vietnam. It was, to say the least, a very interesting time to grow up. I know I saw the world much differently by the time the 70's arrived.

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Hello Chinared....without a doubt it was the most influential decade of my life. I would be hard-pressed to tell you anything that happened during the 80's, but I remember the 60's like it was yesterday.

      Thanks for stopping by and sharing your memories.

    • pramodgokhale profile image

      pramodgokhale 4 years ago from Pune( India)

      Sir,

      I am an Indian .In 1960 i was a school boy and my daddy was telling about USA as a paradise and a few of relatives migrated to US and settled there.

      I was reading about Vietnam bombing and Moon landing. JFK associations was a shock and Indians have special affliction to JFK.

      USA was world leader and helped Europe and Japan to build their economies and Supplied food to poor countries.

      Cold war was the part of that decade.

      It was a booming of US economy and science and technology and government promoted many new developments .

      Yes generations sacrifice for the nation and next generation becomes beneficiary .History begins on new page.

      pramod gokhale

    • billybuc profile image
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      Bill Holland 4 years ago from Olympia, WA

      Pramod, what a wonderful reflection on the generations. I love what you have written here. Bravo! The next generation becomes the beneficiary. Beautiful statement and oh so true.

      Thank you Sir!

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