ArtsAutosBooksBusinessEducationEntertainmentFamilyFashionFoodGamesGenderHealthHolidaysHomeHubPagesPersonal FinancePetsPoliticsReligionSportsTechnologyTravel
  • »
  • Politics and Social Issues»
  • Bias & Hate

The Land of the Free and the Brave?

Updated on December 4, 2014

Stop being black or we kill you

Five people needed to sit on him because the cigarettes might be IEDs
Five people needed to sit on him because the cigarettes might be IEDs | Source

What Happened

A few months ago, a man was killed on a New York sidewalk. He had been selling cigarettes illegally or something equally sinister and the police caught him at it. Naturally, him being such a dangerous criminal and all about five cops had to tackle him to the ground, step on his head and handcuff him. In the process, they cut off his air and he tried to tell them, eleven times, that he couldn’t breathe but being a black man and all, OBVIOUSLY he was lying his huge black ass off; right? So why not ignore his increasingly faint cries about how he’s dying and just continue to hold him in an illegal CHOKEHOLD? I mean, that’s a reasonable thing to do isn’t it? Anyone with any marbles at all would have done the same thing.

And Then?

So the coroner rules that the death of this guy was actually a homicide - meaning that he was murdered; at least to my understanding that’s what homicide means. Now this policeman who choked the guy to death – he was filmed on camera doing it. The man was alive, the policeman choked him, and then the guy was dead. It seems a fairly straightforward chain of events to me. At the very least, this could be labelled involuntary manslaughter. That is assuming that the policemen were deaf and couldn’t hear him stating repeatedly that he was choking to death. Or even disregarding the fact that the choke hold they were using on him had been banned because someone had died in 1993 when the police used it on him. And when that happened, those police officers were charged. So we have precedent, we have prior knowledge that this chokehold is potentially fatal, there is the man screaming that he can’t breathe…however the grand jury failed to find that the policeman had a case to answer. Even the policeman was shocked at this outcome. The fact that New York City immediately began to prepare for protests show that they knew that something was wrong with the outcome. So why is it allowed to stand? That’s the question people need to be asking. Is it a loophole in the law that gives carte blanche for grand juries to ignore evidence and choose whatever verdict suits them? What is this gaping hole in the law that allows the arbitrary innocence or guilt to be decided by a shadowy group of anonymous people who can say yay or nay and nothing anyone can do to change that shit. I mean seriously, how is this justice?

Reactions

Grief
Grief | Source
Pain
Pain | Source

So?

Now people might say, why do you care so much? It has nothing to do with you. Why don’t you worry about your own shit? The killings in Mandera maybe, or the stripping of women in the streets… but I feel that the President’s got it. Appropriate heads are rolling in the Mandera situation, they’re trying to do something about it; someone in authority has got it. As for these men stripping women, I personally invite them to try to strip me so I can teach them a lesson they’ll never forget. But how can I continue to ignore these institutionalised deaths. This isn’t bad things happening to people by other people. This is institutionalised extermination of a group of people. This is the Sharpeville massacre and all the killings that happened during apartheid. This is Syria exterminating its own people that led to the creation of ISIS, this is Israel oppressing Palestine while the world watches. Always, the world watches and does nothing. I don’t know how old I was or even if I was even alive when the Sharpeville massacre took place, but I do remember feeling helpless and fearful watching on TV as police exterminated black people in South Africa. I wanted to do something, but I there was nothing I could do. Just watch other people demonstrate in front of embassies, picket governments to do something. I wonder if anyone is going to picket AmeriKKKa. Oh wait, they already are. Protests have been seen in the UK, Norway, and Hong Kong…even North Korea is disgusted. North Korea people.

Protests

enuff said?
enuff said? | Source
impunity affects everyone
impunity affects everyone | Source
We are Eric Garner
We are Eric Garner | Source

Any Volunteers?

At least South Africa had Mandela and Palestine had Yasser Arafat; who are the leaders that will stand up for black Americans? Obama is hiding in the white house; even his kids are over him, Oprah is busy having Christmas parties, and even Chris Rock is premiering movies. Perhaps Diddy and Revolt TV will take the lead? J.Cole who I believe is British? Where is Al Sharpton? People seem so afraid to stand up for their own. It makes everything even sadder. I suggest that African Americans sue the government for compensation over being bought from their continent, brought to America to be slaves and now that they don’t need them anymore, extermination has began. Sue their asses for 500 billion, buy an island in the Caribbean and move there. Take everyone; Beyonce, Kanye, Le Bron…leave them with Taylor Swift. That’ll teach them.

Where's the leadership?

Oh was he there?
Oh was he there?
He definitely was (JCole)
He definitely was (JCole) | Source

Any Solutions?

On a more serious note however, in search of solutions to this problem the first thing to acknowledge is that it’s probably going to be a marathon, not a sprint. Take education more seriously, especially civic education. Stop being worried about buying the latest J’s and spend that money on buying your children a good education. Deprive yourself of material things to attain things that will improve your communities. Build your power from within. And then use that power, your tyranny of numbers to change things from the outside, in. The power is in your vote; use it – and use it wisely.

Rest In Peace

Eric Garner September 15, 1970 – July 17, 2014 Father, Husband,Victim of Police Brutality, Hashtag
Eric Garner September 15, 1970 – July 17, 2014 Father, Husband,Victim of Police Brutality, Hashtag

Comments

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment

    • AnnemarieMusawale profile image
      Author

      Annemarie Musawale Simiyu 2 years ago from Kenya

      @OrhanGokkayaTR I think that the difference between these cases and people being killed by police in other countries is that the traditional thing to do is hand in your badge, maybe be suspended or dismissed. Probably someone gets charged. When a person dies, killed by authority, someone has to be held accountable. and that's what's not happening here.

    • Dip Mtra profile image

      Dip Mtra 2 years ago from World Citizen

      What is illegal cigarette selling? Never heard of it in Asia. The govt. collects money through excise anyway once the packets are sold to the retailer. So anyone can buy and resell. Where is the criminality here that a man needs to be choked to death?

      Is the KKK still flourishing there? If so, that's sad. A nation that shows the world how to live and makes it a safer place to dwell has such prejudice and bias in its own backyard? Unbelievable. How can it police and preach justice everywhere else when its own house is not in order?.

    • Snakesmum profile image

      Jean DAndrea 2 years ago from Victoria, Australia

      Hhmmm, yesterdays comment has disappeared'-odd.

      How many times is this going to happen before things change? It isn't as if the poor guy was armed, or had a chance of escaping with 5 people practically sitting on him. Happens in many countries with minorities.

    • profile image

      OrhanGokkayaTR 2 years ago

      That's with every other country and it's police departments.

    • wordswithlove profile image

      Neetu M 2 years ago from Pennsylvania, USA

      It is brutality, quite simply. It was a murder of a man pinned to the ground who couldn't have got away no matter how hard he tried. They could have arrested him, if any charges could be verified, or let him go with a warning. To kill him as the officer did was by no means justifiable. There is something seriously wrong with our justice system that allows such heavy-handed acts by the police to go without consequences.

    • Snakesmum profile image

      Jean DAndrea 2 years ago from Victoria, Australia

      Saw the video of this. Hard to resist arrest with five people practically sitting on you. Another needless and unjustified death. Happens here in Australia too, and we never seem to learn.

    • profile image

      OrhanGokkayaTR 2 years ago

      Poor guy, it didn't need to end like this. The officers response to this would be that he resisted arrest...

    • PurvisBobbi44 profile image

      PurvisBobbi44 2 years ago from Florida

      This is so sad and my heart breaks for the family, friends and the rest of us who suffer from afar for their loss of a good family man.

      I cried again when I read what his wife said, "Who will be Santa Claus now?"

      Blessings to you for taking the time to write this hub.

      Bobbi Purvis

    • AnnemarieMusawale profile image
      Author

      Annemarie Musawale Simiyu 2 years ago from Kenya

      Thank you both. Its what I could do to contribute.

    • Abluesfornina profile image

      S Marie 2 years ago

      Good Hub Annemarie, It's hit's dead center everything taking place write now. In Mr. Sharpton's words, "Where is the HUMANITY"!!! Voted Up.

    • Jodah profile image

      John Hansen 2 years ago from Queensland Australia

      Thank you for highlighting this tragic event and other forms of injustice.Very important hub and we need to keep making the world aware. Voted up.