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The Maasai: A tribe that has defied odds of civilization

Updated on October 16, 2019
dwachira profile image

Danson, aka dwachira on Hubpages, is a Kenyan who enjoys sceneries, wild Safaris, people and culture.

The Maasai Warrior
The Maasai Warrior | Source

If you like travelling, then you must have discovered one secret about travelling, and that is, travelling is about discovering.

It is through visiting other places that you discover the world, it is about the exchange of experiences and learning about new places, faces and people.

The best way to understand another culture is to experience it firsthand. You’ll be charmed by the different combined faces and cultures of the world.

A vacation to Kenya is more than just wildlife or scenery. If you are planning a trip to Kenya, be assured that the real face of Kenya is found among the combined faces of many cultures.

Each landscape has a different cultural significance to a different community, and the wildlife has long been an essential part of traditional culture.

One tribe in Kenya called the Maasai, which is among the 42 Kenyan tribes, has defied odds of civilization and still upholds their ancient cultural and traditional ways of life. Maasai is Kenya's most well-known ethnic tribe, they are Nilotic semi-nomadic people located in Southern Kenya and Northern Tanzania. The Maasai speaks the Maa language which is an Eastern Nilotic language, Maasai means “My people” in Maa language.

Maasai have been cattle keepers in terms of wealth and they control large chunk of arid and semi-arid lands in Kenya and Tanzania due to their pastoralism way of life. At the height of their ascendancy in the mid-18th Century, the range lands that they occupied included the fertile volcanic lands in the Great Rift Valley, an area of more than 400,000 km sq.

Maasai people
Maasai people | Source
Maasai people welcoming tourists visitors. Maasai love visitors.
Maasai people welcoming tourists visitors. Maasai love visitors. | Source

Following decades of natural disasters (called Emutai) that killed Maasai population and their cattle, the Maasai also lost much of lands they occupied.

This was as a consequence of a string of natural and historic calamities including drought, smallpox, and cattle pest.

It was estimated that due to these natural disasters, 90 percent of cattle and half of wild animals perished from Rinderpest while Maasai people were hit by numerous diseases including smallpox.

These disasters were made even more worse as this period coincided with droughts where rains failed completely in 1897 and 1898.

By estimates, two-thirds of the Maasai died during this period. Today, the Maasai occupy a total land area of less than 160,000 km sq. with a population of less than one half million people.

Maasai and cattle. The Maasai control large chunks of land.
Maasai and cattle. The Maasai control large chunks of land. | Source
Maasai young Warrior (moran)
Maasai young Warrior (moran) | Source

According to history, the Maasai originated from the lower Nile valley north of Lake Turkana in Northwest Kenya and migrated south at around the 15th century. They arrived into southern part of Kenya and central part of Tanzania occupying vast lands between 17th and 18th century.

These new Maasai lands were already occupied by other original ethnic groups who were forcibly displaced by the incoming Maasai while many others were assimilated into Maasai society.

Although the Maasai do not have history of how they migrated to their present lands, probably due to their exodus being a long process that took many years, it is certain that they were guided by the Kerio River from the Rift Valley until they reached the watered range lands just east of Mt. Elgon.

On their way they fought and pushed aside other pastoralists. They also cultivated long lasting peaceful relationships with neighboring agricultural communities who came to their aid during periodic famines.

A group of Maasai morans
A group of Maasai morans | Source
Maasai girls
Maasai girls | Source
Maasai morans
Maasai morans | Source
Maasai range lands have been converted to national parks and modern conservation areas.
Maasai range lands have been converted to national parks and modern conservation areas. | Source

Maasai lands in Kenya were reduced further when the British colonialists evicted them to make room for settler ranches, subsequently confining them to present lands south of Kenya.

Over the years that followed Kenya’s independence in 1963, more land was taken to create wildlife reserves and national parks.

A lot of Maasai range lands have been reduced since then while other have been converted to national parks and modern conservation areas. Maasai are also involved by the Kenya government in wildlife conservation and their wildlife sanctuaries are some of the best managed and productive conservation areas to visit in Africa.

The Maasai economic activities involves livestock keeping. They are cattle and goat herders and their economy is almost exclusively based on animal stock, from which they take most of their food: meat, milk, and even blood, as certain sacred rituals involve the drinking of cow blood.

Maasai people value blood and they drink blood on special occasions and rituals. For example; blood is given to a circumcised person (olesipolioi), a woman who has given birth (entomononi) or the sick (oltamueyiai).

Blood is very rich in protein and is good for the immune system. However, the supply and use of blood in their traditional diet is waning due to the reduction of livestock. Maasai also depends on cattle for building of their homes which are comprised of crowded huts, the huts of the Maasai dwellings (Kraal) are built from dried cattle dung.

In those early years, the Maasai were considered fierce warriors, feared by many tribes. Their reputation as fierce warriors came from their spiritual beliefs that their rain god (called Ngai) gave all cattle to them, and therefore anyone else who possesses cattle must have stolen them from the Maasai. This has led to some fatal altercations with other neighboring tribes over centuries when the Maasai attempt to reclaim their “stolen possessions”.

A painted Maasai woman near a Maasai Manyatta (Hut) built from dried cattle dung.
A painted Maasai woman near a Maasai Manyatta (Hut) built from dried cattle dung. | Source
Maasai people
Maasai people | Source
Maasai young morans. Notice the plastic shoes.
Maasai young morans. Notice the plastic shoes. | Source

Despite of the modern civilization, the Maasai people have largely managed to maintain their culture and traditional ways of living, although this has become more challenging each year due to external factors.

Maintaining a traditional pastoral lifestyle has become increasingly difficult due to outside influences of the modern world. Due to an increase in Maasai population, loss of cattle populations to diseases, and lack of available grazing range lands due to government park boundaries, the Maasai were forced to develop new ways of sustaining themselves.

The Maasai people uphold their traditional rituals up to today. There are numerous traditions and ceremonies that are performed by Maasai men. The best known is the warrior "jumping" dance, where young Maasai warriors (morans) leap into the air from a standing position, in order to demonstrate their strength and agility.

Another famous ceremony that was performed during marriage is where a Maasai moran was required to kill a Lion before getting a wife. With laws aiming at protecting wildlife, this practice has stopped, although there is evidence that it continues in the more remote regions of Kenya.

Maasai warriors "jumping" dance
Maasai warriors "jumping" dance | Source
Maasai warriors "jumping" dance
Maasai warriors "jumping" dance | Source
Teenage girls during one of the Maasai rituals
Teenage girls during one of the Maasai rituals | Source
Maasai woman with ornaments
Maasai woman with ornaments | Source

Circumcision in Maasai is an important rite of passage to adulthood and the ceremony is performed for both young men and girls.

Circumcision in Maasai is done according to generation of 15 years or so where a new and individually named generation of Morans (warriors) will be initiated.

This generation is mostly made up of boys between the age of 12 and 25 years who have reached puberty.

Each young man is supposed to kill a lion before he is circumcised, although this activity of killing a lion has now been banned. Elder men perform circumcision to teenage boys who have attained the age for adulthood.

The young boys are not supposed to moan or make any noise during the cut. The boy must endure the operation in silence and expressions of pain can bring dishonor.

During this circumcision period, the newly circumcised young men will live in a "Manyatta", a village built by their mothers. The manyatta has no encircling barricade for protection, emphasizing the warrior role of protecting the community.

Circumcision for teenage girls is performed by elder women but the girls are permitted to cry. Despite the Kenya government efforts to stop this female ritual the attempts have failed, primarily due to the fact that it is the Maasai women who defend the practice and often the ritual is done in secrecy.

Maasai women love beads ornaments
Maasai women love beads ornaments | Source

In early years, the Maasai used cow hides and skin as their clothes but since 60’s they have adopted fabric clothing. Shuka is the Maasai Maa word for sheets traditionally worn wrapped around the body.

Red is the preferred color in Maasai attire, however, blue, black, striped, and checkered cloths are also worn. The Maasai shoes are simple hand made sandals, which were until recently made from cowhides although they are now soled with tire strips or plastic.

Clothing varies by age occasion and location. For example, Young men wear black for several months following their circumcision.

Bead working has a long history among the Maasai, it is done by women who use it to articulate their identity and position in society through body ornaments and body painting.

This bead work plays an essential part in the ornamentation of their body as both men and women wear ornaments. Maasai men always carry a wooden club (o-rinka) as a symbol of protecting their community.

Head shaving is a common practice in Maasai as it signifies different rites of passage. A child will be shaved upon reaching the age of three years when he/she is being named. Two days before the boys are circumcised, their heads are shaved. This does not mean that Maasai do not cherish their hair. After circumcision, the young warriors grow their hair again and spend a great deal of time styling it.

The Maasai "Jumping" Dance

 After circumcision, the young warriors grow their hair again and spend a great deal of time styling it. The plaited hair is dressed with animal fat and ocher, and parted across the top of the head at ear level.
After circumcision, the young warriors grow their hair again and spend a great deal of time styling it. The plaited hair is dressed with animal fat and ocher, and parted across the top of the head at ear level.

The plaited hair is often dressed with animal fat and ocher, and parted across the top of the head at ear level. This is done until when the warriors go through another rite of passage called the Eunoto to become elders, when their long plaited hair is shaved off.

For the Maasai women, the head is shaven almost all the time and if not, then their hair is kept short.

Due to the diminishing livestock and land for grazing, many Maasai people have begun to cultivate maize and other crops, a practice that is viewed as negative culturally.

The ability to graze their cattle over large territories has diminished considerably in recent years, due to increased urbanization and the declaration of the Masai Mara and Serengeti game reserves, which were all formerly Maasai grazing lands.

Maasai women. The head is shaven almost all the time or the hair is kept short.
Maasai women. The head is shaven almost all the time or the hair is kept short. | Source

In recent years, some Maasai especially the young generations have abandoned the traditional way of life and looked into emerging forms of employment including farming, business of selling traditional medicine, milk and milk products and women are involved in selling of embroideries. Maasai people also seek wage employment as waiters, tourist guides, security guards and watchmen.

Today you will find young Maasai men and women in major towns and cities of Kenya selling, not just goats and cows, but also beads, grains, charcoal among other items. The Kenya government has initiated many projects to help Maasai people preserve their culture and traditions while also balancing the education needs of their children for the modern world.

Some Maasai have turned into farming
Some Maasai have turned into farming | Source

Many Maasai have moved away from the nomadic ways of life to attain great success and achievements in education and have acquired positions in corporate and government sectors.

Despite this upward urban trend, many urbanized Maasai men will still shun the urban clothing when they go back home and wear a “shuka”, hand made cow hide sandals and carry a wooden club (o-rinka) and feel at ease with themselves and the world.

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    • rfmoran profile image

      Russ Moran - The Write Stuff 

      6 years ago from Long Island, New York

      Great Hub and super photos. I have always been fascinated by the Massai, ever since I discovered that my last name (Moran) means a young Massai warrior. Great job. Russ Moran

    • profile image

      yeeenaah :P 

      6 years ago

      thanks 4 the info.....

    • Mel Carriere profile image

      Mel Carriere 

      6 years ago from San Diego California

      I met the Masai while on a trip to Amboseli National Park from Mombassa back in 1985. I was in the Navy. Best trip of my life. Supposedly the Masai believe that a camera will steal their soul, but they let you take pictures with them for a nominal fee. Beautiful country. Nice work!

    • mr-veg profile image

      mr-veg 

      6 years ago from Colorado United States

      Nice to know about Kenya and it's Ancient heritage tribe.. The pictures are really nice.. Voted Up and shared..

    • dwachira profile imageAUTHOR

      Danson Wachira 

      7 years ago from Nairobi, Kenya

      Hi Levertis Steele,

      Glad that you liked it, you should visit Maasai one day and experience their culture firsthand. Thanks for the visit and comment.

    • Levertis Steele profile image

      Levertis Steele 

      7 years ago from Southern Clime

      This hub is thorough, colorful, well organizes, and well illustrated.

      The information about the Maasai tribe is quite interesting. Thanks for sharing!

    • dwachira profile imageAUTHOR

      Danson Wachira 

      7 years ago from Nairobi, Kenya

      Hi Purpose Embraced,

      Maasai are great people to be with, Thanks for the visit and comment.

    • Purpose Embraced profile image

      Yvette Stupart PhD 

      7 years ago from Jamaica

      A great hub with so much to learn about the Maassai. I love the pictures!

    • dwachira profile imageAUTHOR

      Danson Wachira 

      7 years ago from Nairobi, Kenya

      Hi LaThing,

      You are very welcome to Kenya, I know you will really like it and especially because Maasai love visitors. Thanks for the visit and comment.

    • dwachira profile imageAUTHOR

      Danson Wachira 

      7 years ago from Nairobi, Kenya

      Hi Spongy0llama,

      A lot of land that belonged to Maasai was taken from them during colonialism and Maasai had to look for alternative lands. I think Maasai population would be more that this if they had more lands. Thanks for the visit and comment

    • dwachira profile imageAUTHOR

      Danson Wachira 

      7 years ago from Nairobi, Kenya

      Hi Paul,

      Thanks friend for the visit and comment. The Maa language is not actually difficult to learn, I have seen tourists from Europe and other countries are able to learn the language quickly and use it locally. Maasai are such fascinating people, better appreciated though a visit.

    • LaThing profile image

      LaThing 

      7 years ago from From a World Within, USA

      Awwww...... This IS a beautiful hub!! Such nice pictures and so much information, it's breathtaking! Really enjoyed it....... One of the things in my bucket list to visit Kenya :)

      Voting up and awesome!

    • Spongy0llama profile image

      Jake Brannen 

      7 years ago from Canada

      Fascinating. I have taken a rather keen interest in anthropology. Colonialism really is a terrible thing leaving a scarred legacy on beautiful ancient traditions and peoples. It's a shame how much people like the Maasai have been so diminished in recent centuries.

    • Paul Kuehn profile image

      Paul Richard Kuehn 

      7 years ago from Udorn City, Thailand

      dwachira,

      This is an extremely interesting hub about the Maasai tribe, and I certainly have learned a lot. The pictures in this hub are really great. Is the Maasai language very difficult to learn? Voted up and sharing with followers and on Facebook. Also Pinning.

    • dwachira profile imageAUTHOR

      Danson Wachira 

      7 years ago from Nairobi, Kenya

      Wow! Moran is such a great name in Kenya, i always see that "moran" in your name rfmoran and wonder what a great name you have. Thanks for the visit and comment.

    • rfmoran profile image

      Russ Moran - The Write Stuff 

      7 years ago from Long Island, New York

      Because my name is Moran (young warrior!) I had read this hub. Fascinating job about a fascinating people. Voted up and awesome. Great job Danson.

    • dwachira profile imageAUTHOR

      Danson Wachira 

      7 years ago from Nairobi, Kenya

      Hi Linda,

      Am glad that you like this article about the Maasai people, their love for culture is really amazing. Thanks for the visit and comment.

    • lrc7815 profile image

      Linda Crist 

      7 years ago from Central Virginia

      What an absolutely beautiful article about a nomadic group that I have been fascinated by since I was a young girl. You have offered an awesome picture of the culture and the hardships the Maasai people have endured. The photos are a stunning compliment to the article and to the culture. Voted up and awesome. I am so happy to see this here on HP. I commend you!

    • dwachira profile imageAUTHOR

      Danson Wachira 

      7 years ago from Nairobi, Kenya

      Hi anglnwu,

      Maasai are the most friendly people i have ever met, humble and like visitors. Thanks for the visit and comment.

    • dwachira profile imageAUTHOR

      Danson Wachira 

      7 years ago from Nairobi, Kenya

      Hi howlermunkey,

      You are very welcome to Kenya and i hope to see you soon. Thanks for the visit and comment. I really appreciate.

    • anglnwu profile image

      anglnwu 

      7 years ago

      Very interesting hub on Maasai people. They have such joy on their faces and I simply love their colorful clothes. Thanks for sharing.

    • howlermunkey profile image

      Jeff Boettner 

      7 years ago from Tampa, FL

      Excellent read, I enjoyed this article. I didn't know much about the Maasai until now. A trip to Kenya is on my "Bucket List", and I'll be sure to visit the Maasai as well. Great hub (and It's fantastic that you can buy hand made Maasai craftwork on eBay!) Up and sharing this one.

    • dwachira profile imageAUTHOR

      Danson Wachira 

      7 years ago from Nairobi, Kenya

      Hi RichusFridum,

      Am glad that you found this article to be useful, i like reading about other people culture and i can see am not alone. Thanks for the visit and comment.

    • RichusFridum profile image

      RichusFridum 

      7 years ago from Atlanta, Georgia

      Man this was a great hub. I have been meaning to educate myself on this famous tribe and you really provided some insightful and interesting information.

      BRAVO!

    • dwachira profile imageAUTHOR

      Danson Wachira 

      7 years ago from Nairobi, Kenya

      Hi mecheshier,

      Many of us lost our traditions long ago, am really proud of this tribe seeing that they have kept their culture and traditions despite civilization. Thanks for the visit and comment. I really appreciate.

    • dwachira profile imageAUTHOR

      Danson Wachira 

      7 years ago from Nairobi, Kenya

      Hi Bill,

      I do promise, when you decide to come and visit this tribe, i'll play host only that i will demand you try the "Jumping" dance :) Thanks for visit and comment, enjoy your day.

    • billybuc profile image

      Bill Holland 

      7 years ago from Olympia, WA

      A fascinating study of a fascinating group of people. Thank you for educating me and bringing us all a bit closer.

    • dwachira profile imageAUTHOR

      Danson Wachira 

      7 years ago from Nairobi, Kenya

      Hi Suzie HQ ,

      The Maasai are the most friendly people i have ever met, they recognize every visitor (new or return) with a lot of excitements, you feel like you really like your home there. I suggest that you visit this tribe and witness it by yourself. Thanks for the visit and comment. I really appreciate it.

    • dwachira profile imageAUTHOR

      Danson Wachira 

      7 years ago from Nairobi, Kenya

      Hi Sharkye11,

      Thanks for the visit and comment, am glad that you enjoyed reading about the Maasai. This tribe is better appreciated by a visit and i can assure you that it will be worthy it. Welcome to Maasai land.

    • mecheshier profile image

      mecheshier 

      7 years ago

      Wow, what beautiful people! It warms my heart so, knowing that they have kept their traditions. The world has lost so many culture.

      Voted up for beautiful and interesting. Thanks so much for sharing.

    • Suzie HQ profile image

      Suzanne Ridgeway 

      7 years ago from Dublin, Ireland

      Hi dwachira,

      What a fantastic read on the amazing Maasai people. I have found the history and traditions of this wonderful tribe so interesting. From their tradition of female circumcision to their jewelry making, they lead a fascinating life. Thanks for putting together a hugely informative article with gorgeous photo choices.

      VU, Interesting, Awesome and shared - great job with tons of facts!

    • Sharkye11 profile image

      Jayme Kinsey 

      7 years ago from Oklahoma

      Wonderfully engaging hub about very beautiful people. I have always been in awe of the Maasai, they were such incredible warriors. I hope they are allowed to preserve their traditions for as long as they want, without being pressured too much by people who think they know what is best for nomadic tribes.

      Voting up!

    • tammyswallow profile image

      Tammy 

      7 years ago from North Carolina

      This is an outstanding hub. I learned a lot about this tribe of Kenya. It is probably a good thing that they are integrating into society. Very enjoyable read!

    • dwachira profile imageAUTHOR

      Danson Wachira 

      7 years ago from Nairobi, Kenya

      Hi SkeetyD,

      Thanks for the visit and comment, i hope one day you shall make it and visit this wonderful tribe. Enjoy your day.

    • dwachira profile imageAUTHOR

      Danson Wachira 

      7 years ago from Nairobi, Kenya

      Hi Lastheart,

      Thanks for the visit and comment, am familiar with the series of African people and i particularly liked it when you wrote about the Elgeyo people. I will appreciate the support.

    • dwachira profile imageAUTHOR

      Danson Wachira 

      7 years ago from Nairobi, Kenya

      Hi Radcliff,

      Thanks for the visit and comment, the Maasai have, for years, maintained their culture and traditions, they are best appreciated by a visit and so i welcome you to visit them.

    • profile image

      SkeetyD 

      7 years ago

      This is a fascinating hub! So detailed and filled with information. One of the best hubs I've read this year.

    • dwachira profile imageAUTHOR

      Danson Wachira 

      7 years ago from Nairobi, Kenya

      Hi healthylife2 ,

      Am glad you found this article to be enjoyable, Maasai is Kenya's most visited tribe due to their culture and traditions. Thanks for the visit and comment.

    • Lastheart profile image

      Maria Magdalena Ruiz O'Farrill 

      7 years ago from Borikén the great land of the valiant and noble Lord

      dwachira this a great article. For my series of African people I was asked to write about this tribe for the letter "M" now what I will do is link this to my hubs. I am happy that Africa is being presented to those who hardly know about such fabulous people.

    • Radcliff profile image

      Liz Davis 

      7 years ago from Hudson, FL

      So interesting! I love to read about people who maintain their traditional lifestyles. It's unfortunate that Western influence has such a negative impact on many who choose tradition over industry. The photos you included are amazing. Thanks for this awesome hub!

    • StephSev108 profile image

      Stephanie Marie Severson 

      7 years ago from Atlanta, GA

      Awesome hub. Thanks for the info.

    • profile image

      healthylife2 

      7 years ago

      Really enjoyed learning about the Maasai tribe and think it would be so interesting to travel to Kenya. The video about the jumping dance was fun to watch and I love the colorful clothing. It seems like much more of a low stress lifestyle than most of us live. Voted up and shared!

    • dwachira profile imageAUTHOR

      Danson Wachira 

      7 years ago from Nairobi, Kenya

      Hi Rajan,

      The Maasai tribe is really amazing, humble and very hospitable to the many visitors who flock their habitats. Thanks for the visit, reading and commenting. I really appreciate the support.

    • rajan jolly profile image

      Rajan Singh Jolly 

      7 years ago from From Mumbai, presently in Jalandhar, INDIA.

      Danson, I learnt about the masai tribe the first time from your article. You have put together a very useful and interesting set of facts on this nomadic tribe that has now ventured into modern way of living.

      Nice to learn about a new culture.

      Voted up, useful and interesting. shared this hub.

    • dwachira profile imageAUTHOR

      Danson Wachira 

      7 years ago from Nairobi, Kenya

      Hi learner365,

      Thanks for finding time to stop here, reading and commenting. Maasai is Kenya's most celebrated tribe. They love visitors and they always welcome visitors with their famous jump dance. Welcome to Kenya.

    • dwachira profile imageAUTHOR

      Danson Wachira 

      7 years ago from Nairobi, Kenya

      Hi kashmir56,

      Maasai people are really amazing, you should visit them one day. Thanks for the visit and comment. I really do appreciate your support here.

    • learner365 profile image

      Saadia A 

      7 years ago

      What an interesting Hub with great photos. You have really well explained the Maasai tribe and their culture. You mentioned in your article that traveling is about discovery but after reading all the above information i think i have already discovered much about the Maasai tribe even without that :)

      It is also good to know that Kenyan government is focusing on the education and preservation of their culture.

      Thanks for sharing about one of the most known tribes of Kenya. Voted up and much more!!!

    • kashmir56 profile image

      Thomas Silvia 

      7 years ago from Massachusetts

      Hi dwachira great well written hub, i have enjoyed reading about Maasai tribe and their customs and learning more about them . I have learned so much from reading this wonderful hub and loved all the very beautiful photos has well.

      Vote up and more !!! SHARING !

    • dwachira profile imageAUTHOR

      Danson Wachira 

      7 years ago from Nairobi, Kenya

      Hello Cheryl J., you are very welcome to Nairobi, Kenya and i can assure you your trip will be worthy. Thanks for the visit and comment. Enjoy your day.

    • dwachira profile imageAUTHOR

      Danson Wachira 

      7 years ago from Nairobi, Kenya

      @Wendell Patterson, thanks for the visit and comment.

    • dwachira profile imageAUTHOR

      Danson Wachira 

      7 years ago from Nairobi, Kenya

      @Kris Heeter, am happy to know that you have been to Kenya and witnessed the Maasai culture first hand. Thanks for the visit here and comment.

    • Cheryl J. profile image

      Cheryl J. 

      7 years ago from Houston, TX

      A very brilliant and inspiring hub. I love the bright colors the Maasai adorn themselves with. A beautiful culture. I am amazed with the jumping dance. My dream is to visit Nairobi and go on a safari and visit Kenyan villages and see how Kenyan tea is grown and harvested. Beautiful photos, information and video of beautiful Kenya.

    • Wendell Patterson profile image

      Wendell Patterson 

      7 years ago from Alabama

      great hub

    • Kris Heeter profile image

      Kris Heeter 

      7 years ago from Indiana

      I had the honor of seeing the Maasai when visiting Kenya several years ago and had a wonderful Maasai guide one afternoon during a week of safari. Kenya is such a diverse and beautiful country - such a generous people to those visiting! Great hub!

    • dwachira profile imageAUTHOR

      Danson Wachira 

      7 years ago from Nairobi, Kenya

      Peggy W, Maasai is such a wonderful tribe, one has to be with them to feel and experience a piece of their culture and tradition. They are the most humble people i have ever met but can also be very violent when provoked. Circumcision is part of their rites and despite the government efforts to persuade them to drop this rite on young girls, it still take place in secrecy though in decreasing trends. Thanks for the visit, comment, voting and support. I really do appreciate.

    • Peggy W profile image

      Peggy Woods 

      7 years ago from Houston, Texas

      What a wonderful article and so beautifully illustrated with photos regarding the Maasai tribe in Africa. I hope that they can hang on to many of their customs as time passes. It must be difficult given their nomadic lifestyle now that their territory has been so diminished. Nice to know, however, that they are an integral part of the conservation efforts in Kenya. Ouch to the circumcision! I learned much from reading this hub. Many up votes and will share.

    • dwachira profile imageAUTHOR

      Danson Wachira 

      7 years ago from Nairobi, Kenya

      @allaboutflights, how sad to hear Jarawas of Andaman and Nicobar Islands in India are not allowed to interact with tourists, the government must surely do something about this. Thanks for the visit and comment.

      @lasborn, we do appreciate and envy Maasai a lot, all these years they have maintained their traditions and culture, we have a lot to learn from them. Thanks for stopping by and commenting.

    • profile image

      lasborn 

      7 years ago

      I do appreciate the Massai a lot bcos they hv, despite the level of civilisation d world over to keep, maintain preserve and cherish their culture and roots. the kenyan government should be very proud of this.

    • allaboutflights profile image

      Naveen Sehgal 

      7 years ago from Gurgaon, Haryana, India

      This is a great hub on Maasai.

      I saw from your photos that the Maasai are allowed to interact with the tourists. I wish the same could be done for the Jarawas of Andaman and Nicobar Islands in India. No one is allowed to enter the islands occupied by these tribals.

    • dwachira profile imageAUTHOR

      Danson Wachira 

      7 years ago from Nairobi, Kenya

      Thanks denism, i really appreciate your concern.

    • denism profile image

      Dennis Mathenge 

      7 years ago from Sweden

      More effort should be put into that. The Maasai have really tried their best to preserve their culture despite pressure and influence of the western culture that has affected almost every other tribe in Kenya.

    • dwachira profile imageAUTHOR

      Danson Wachira 

      7 years ago from Nairobi, Kenya

      Thanks denism for stopping by and commenting, although the Kenyan government is educating the Maasai on the need to move with world trends, part of the government is dedicated to preserve this culture as it brings huge foreign income through tourism.

    • denism profile image

      Dennis Mathenge 

      7 years ago from Sweden

      Fantastic. You have really done the Maasai people justice on this hub. Great to know people appreciate them and their culture. Not to forget they are a great tourist attraction in Kenya. Great work dwachira

    • dwachira profile imageAUTHOR

      Danson Wachira 

      7 years ago from Nairobi, Kenya

      Thanks Anil and Honey for your visit and comment, you are very welcome to Kenya.

    • Anil and Honey profile image

      Anil 

      7 years ago from Kerala

      "traveling is about discovering", good, I like your simple language. If I have a chance for visiting foreign country I will come to kenya.

    • dwachira profile imageAUTHOR

      Danson Wachira 

      7 years ago from Nairobi, Kenya

      @bethperry, it is true, Maasai are very kind and friendly people. I kindly invite you to come and visit. Thanks for reading.

      @sgbrown, you are very much welcome to Kenya.

    • sgbrown profile image

      Sheila Brown 

      7 years ago from Southern Oklahoma

      Ha ha dwachira! Visiting Kenya is on my bucket list! If I do ever get to visit there I will definately let you know. :)

    • bethperry profile image

      Beth Perry 

      7 years ago from Tennesee

      dwachira, I very much enjoyed reading this Hub! A great uncle of mine spent a lot of time with the Maasai back in the 1950's and 1960's filming documentaries about their culture and history. He had several gifts from them, too, including a vessel that they used drinking blood and milk. He once told me the Maasai were some of the kindest and friendly people he'd ever met, which is why I think he visited them as often as he did.

      Voting up, great reading.

    • dwachira profile imageAUTHOR

      Danson Wachira 

      7 years ago from Nairobi, Kenya

      Thanks jainismus for visiting, reading and sharing.

    • jainismus profile image

      Mahaveer Sanglikar 

      7 years ago from Pune, India

      Great information with great photographs. Thank you for writing such an informative Hub. Voted up and shared with followers.

    • dwachira profile imageAUTHOR

      Danson Wachira 

      7 years ago from Nairobi, Kenya

      Thanks sgbrown for stopping by and reading. You are very welcome to visit Kenya and let me know when you are coming, i won't mind to be your tour guide...opps! i almost grabbed one of the Maasai's job!

    • dwachira profile imageAUTHOR

      Danson Wachira 

      7 years ago from Nairobi, Kenya

      @brenda12lynette, when people have a will to maintain their culture, they can really do it and i think that is what drives the Maasai. Thanks for reading and sharing.

      @TIMETRAVELER2, am glad you found it enjoyable, thanks for reading and sharing.

      @dinkan53 , i agree with you but the good thing is that the Kenyan government is coming out strongly to enlighten the Maasai on ways to move forward and still maintain their culture. Thank for reading.

    • sgbrown profile image

      Sheila Brown 

      7 years ago from Southern Oklahoma

      I so hope that the Maasai find a medium in keeping their culture, which I believe is very important, and moderization. I would love to travel to Kenya and not only see the wildlife, but the Maasai as well. I love learning about different cultures. Great, detailed information, very good hub! Voted up and interesting. Have a wonderful day! :)

    • dinkan53 profile image

      dinkan53 

      7 years ago from India

      Poverty among the Maasai is increasing and illiteracy among women is considered as the primary cause of malnutrition and poor health, thereby restricting the economic development in their area. Really nice article and enjoyed the video- the jump dance. Voted up and interesting.

    • TIMETRAVELER2 profile image

      Sondra Rochelle 

      7 years ago from USA

      This hub was breathtaking. Excellent descriptions and fabulous photos and very well written. I hope the Maasai will be able to maintain their traditions, but frankly don't know how their young can endure the circumcisions. Fascinating is all I can say. Voted up, awesome, beautiful, interesting and shared.

    • brenda12lynette profile image

      brenda12lynette 

      7 years ago from Utah

      What detailed information and amazing pictures! It always amazes me when groups of people are able to maintain their local customs and traditions despite the push of modernization. Great hub and voted up!

    • dwachira profile imageAUTHOR

      Danson Wachira 

      7 years ago from Nairobi, Kenya

      I wish Angela Brummer you would have time to come see this tribe, really amazing. Thanks for sharing.

    • Angela Brummer profile image

      Angela Brummer 

      7 years ago from Lincoln, Nebraska

      This is an amazing hub! I have shared this first rate article!

    • dwachira profile imageAUTHOR

      Danson Wachira 

      7 years ago from Nairobi, Kenya

      Thanks maxoxam41 for reading and i look forward to read more of your hubs.

    • maxoxam41 profile image

      Deforest 

      7 years ago from USA

      Interesting hub.

    • dwachira profile imageAUTHOR

      Danson Wachira 

      7 years ago from Nairobi, Kenya

      Thanks The Rising Glory, Maasai are amazing people and also very friendly and they like visitors.

      Places offering Maasai goodies have sprung up in many places in Kenya especially around the game parks to cater for the growing demand about Maasai including Maasai ornaments and culinary.

      I feel sorry for this tribe, they have maintained their culture for a long time but of late they seem to be torn between their traditions and civilization.

      Thanks for reading and thanks for visiting Kenya.

    • The Rising Glory profile image

      The Rising Glory 

      7 years ago from California

      I've been to Kenya five times since 2000, I have taken pictures with the Maasai (paying them of course), they are an interesting group of people.

      There was a very good restaurant in Nairobi called the Maasai Meat Market, but I believe that it is now closed.

      As you stated, I have seen much of their nomadic ways decrease over the time that I have visited Kenya.

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