ArtsAutosBooksBusinessEducationEntertainmentFamilyFashionFoodGamesGenderHealthHolidaysHomeHubPagesPersonal FinancePetsPoliticsReligionSportsTechnologyTravel

The Palestinian-Israeli Conflict

Updated on February 20, 2011

Palestininan-Isreali Peace Talks in Danger

Vice President Joe Biden should be commended for what has been repeatedly referenced as his “unusually blunt” criticism of the Israeli announcement earlier this week that it planned to build 1600 new apartments in East Jerusalem.

What has not gotten much mention is that the rather strong statement of condemnation is representative of a minor but yet very significant shift in the US’s official position when it comes to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. The Obama Administration should be applauded for, at least this time, appearing as an even-handed negotiator.

I referenced the administration’s public criticism of Israel as minor principally because even as Biden was chiding the Israeli government for this action, he was quick to tow the traditional US line: vituperatively declaring the US government’s unwavering support of Israel; its # 1 ally in the Middle East.

The problem with this centerpiece to the US policy in the region is that it undeniably undercuts any claim by the US of being a disinterested, neutral third party. It causes the Palestinians, and other concerned interests for that matter, to approach these iterations of moves by the US to revive the peace process with much distrust and trepidation.

Regarding the Israeli decision to expand and consolidate its holdings in East Jerusalem, coming on the heels of another US brokered agreement to re-start long-stalled indirect talks between the Palestinians and the Israelis, this move by Israel has been characterized by almost everyone involved but the Israeli government as not only having the potential of scuttling these talks but being an affront to any person modestly interested in peace in the region.

As ought be expected, the Israeli government did what it does best: denial and obfuscation. It first indicated that it was either unaware of the plan to erect the new structures or claimed that it did not directly sponsor it. Once the incredulity of this position finally set in, it reverted to arguing that the property in question was really not in contested East Jerusalem.

The Palestinians, on the other hand, recoiled with despair and fury; and rightfully so, perhaps. Their Chief Negotiator, Saeb Erakat, declared that by this action the Israeli’s were clearly showing a lack of interest in peace. Referring to the internationally backed peace plan, he opined that “stopping settlements is not a Palestinian condition, it’s an Israeli obligation under the road map.”

Unless the US government, through Special Envoy George Mitchell, abandons the usual exchange of niceties (the Israelis calling us “true friend” and telling us that “it’s good to be home;” us reassuring them that “there is absolutely no space between the United States and Israel when it comes to Israel’s security”) and truly gets in front of this by pressuring Israeli to cancel its latest real estate expansion bid, the indirect talks might as well be as good as dead. The Palestinians will pull out and no one should fault them for this decision.

Comments

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment

    • profile image

      thinking 

      8 years ago

      Poorly said.

      "The problem with this centerpiece to the US policy in the region is that it undeniably undercuts any claim by the US of being a disinterested, neutral third party"

      There is no one who should ever think the US is a disinterested third party. There are many reasons that it's obvious the US really cares what happens in the Middle East.

      "this move by Israel has been characterized by almost everyone involved but the Isreali government as not only having the potential of scuttling these talks but being an affront to any person modestly interested in peace in the region."

      True, further expansion may stop peace talks, but ask yourself are the Palestinians truly "modestly interested in peace in the region"? Or perhaps the issue is they are only modestly interested not truly interested. Did the withdrawal form Gaza lead to peace in that region?

    working

    This website uses cookies

    As a user in the EEA, your approval is needed on a few things. To provide a better website experience, hubpages.com uses cookies (and other similar technologies) and may collect, process, and share personal data. Please choose which areas of our service you consent to our doing so.

    For more information on managing or withdrawing consents and how we handle data, visit our Privacy Policy at: https://hubpages.com/privacy-policy#gdpr

    Show Details
    Necessary
    HubPages Device IDThis is used to identify particular browsers or devices when the access the service, and is used for security reasons.
    LoginThis is necessary to sign in to the HubPages Service.
    Google RecaptchaThis is used to prevent bots and spam. (Privacy Policy)
    AkismetThis is used to detect comment spam. (Privacy Policy)
    HubPages Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide data on traffic to our website, all personally identifyable data is anonymized. (Privacy Policy)
    HubPages Traffic PixelThis is used to collect data on traffic to articles and other pages on our site. Unless you are signed in to a HubPages account, all personally identifiable information is anonymized.
    Amazon Web ServicesThis is a cloud services platform that we used to host our service. (Privacy Policy)
    CloudflareThis is a cloud CDN service that we use to efficiently deliver files required for our service to operate such as javascript, cascading style sheets, images, and videos. (Privacy Policy)
    Google Hosted LibrariesJavascript software libraries such as jQuery are loaded at endpoints on the googleapis.com or gstatic.com domains, for performance and efficiency reasons. (Privacy Policy)
    Features
    Google Custom SearchThis is feature allows you to search the site. (Privacy Policy)
    Google MapsSome articles have Google Maps embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    Google ChartsThis is used to display charts and graphs on articles and the author center. (Privacy Policy)
    Google AdSense Host APIThis service allows you to sign up for or associate a Google AdSense account with HubPages, so that you can earn money from ads on your articles. No data is shared unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    Google YouTubeSome articles have YouTube videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    VimeoSome articles have Vimeo videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    PaypalThis is used for a registered author who enrolls in the HubPages Earnings program and requests to be paid via PayPal. No data is shared with Paypal unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    Facebook LoginYou can use this to streamline signing up for, or signing in to your Hubpages account. No data is shared with Facebook unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    MavenThis supports the Maven widget and search functionality. (Privacy Policy)
    Marketing
    Google AdSenseThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Google DoubleClickGoogle provides ad serving technology and runs an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Index ExchangeThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    SovrnThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Facebook AdsThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Amazon Unified Ad MarketplaceThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    AppNexusThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    OpenxThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Rubicon ProjectThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    TripleLiftThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Say MediaWe partner with Say Media to deliver ad campaigns on our sites. (Privacy Policy)
    Remarketing PixelsWe may use remarketing pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to advertise the HubPages Service to people that have visited our sites.
    Conversion Tracking PixelsWe may use conversion tracking pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to identify when an advertisement has successfully resulted in the desired action, such as signing up for the HubPages Service or publishing an article on the HubPages Service.
    Statistics
    Author Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide traffic data and reports to the authors of articles on the HubPages Service. (Privacy Policy)
    ComscoreComScore is a media measurement and analytics company providing marketing data and analytics to enterprises, media and advertising agencies, and publishers. Non-consent will result in ComScore only processing obfuscated personal data. (Privacy Policy)
    Amazon Tracking PixelSome articles display amazon products as part of the Amazon Affiliate program, this pixel provides traffic statistics for those products (Privacy Policy)