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Unity over Equality.

Updated on April 4, 2013

These are some things I just needed to say.

I think that what I am about to write down here is a fairly unique view.
If I'm right about that, I am very concerned.
We live in a time, where frankly... We're all a little too politically correct.
We are so desperate to appear unprejudiced, to seem progressive and open-minded that honestly, we sacrifice a bit of who we are. We go out of our way, we water ourselves down, just to appease a preconceived social notion of what is acceptable.
I think that we are too focused on equality. We are too focused on making everybody feel accepted, and comfortable and...
I think that we should focus on unity.
Instead of breaking down the ways that everyone needs to be equal, we should work on becoming united.
I think, that in some ways, we have put up walls, we have created a world where labels partially define us. We're consumed with making sure that everyone has the same rights by dividing people into groups.
Gay marriage is a national issue. It is something being discussed in every corner of the country.
But look no further
We are now discussing homosexual Americans in a different category from heterosexual Americans. Even with good intentions, we have now classified gay Americans as different from other Americans. I like redheads. I don't know why, but something about girls with red hair... It turns me on. Because I'm not as attracted to girls with dark hair, should I be treated differently? Should I have a category all to myself? No. People would just chuckle and move along. So, if my friend, who is a girl, happens to be attracted to another girl, what is the real difference? And why do we feel the need to talk about it. So, lets say, in the next few years, understanding and open mindedness become contagious and the entire country makes same sex marriages legal, would we be able to completely eradicate Gay as a derogatory term? It's ridiculous.
But you know what's even more risque than same sex conversations?
Religion.
This country was founded on freedom from religious persecution. People came to America so that they could believe whatever they wanted to, worship whoever they wanted to, and yet?
See the nasty looks that somebody gets if they carry a copy of the Qur'an instead of your standard bible.
Hear the anti-semantic remarks made about a man walking down the street wearing a Kippah.
But what difference does it make?! If somebody believes something other than yourself, what justifies you to pass judgement? Would you like him or her to look at you that way? Because if you're justified in judging them for their beliefs, then so are they. They believe just as strongly, or in some cases, don't believe just as strongly as you do. How does it affect your life if they disagree?
I think that orange Tic Tac's are the best. Are you going to hold that against me if you like mint better?
It's foolish, outdated, and by allowing it to interfere with the energy in the world, you've taken one step against peace.

And the biggest issue? The one that makes the least sense?
Race.
Religions have conflicts.
People have fears that prevent them from accepting things they are unaccustomed to.
But why the hell have we not moved past racism?
Why do we allow ourselves to be mentally segregate ourselves by letting skin color define us?
Why do we insist are making it an issue?
I don't say, "Oh here's my friend John, he's got blue eyes".
It's essentially the same.
If I was blind, I wouldn't know the difference. So why do we create a difference?
Why do we keep racism on life support by making it an issue?
My definition of racism isn't disliking somebody because of their skin color, my definition of racism is allowing the race of another person to even enter our minds as a factor.
When we stop using these labels to define one another and just start seeing people for who they are, we can evolve as a species. When we learn to love each other based on who we are instead of what we are, we can finally start working towards peace.
When we stop saying that dirty words represent racism, prejudice, and intolerance, and realize that the barriers we are putting up against each other are lies, and that those lies keep prejudice alive, we can be better than our forefathers ever dreamed we would be.

One of my favorite quotes from one of my favorite actors.

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      Aedan 4 years ago

      I read that and agree mostly. I think that people should be allowed to do and think what they want, that's what makes us unique but legally, we should be united. As in, there shouldn't be laws segregating people based on religion, race, etc.

    • Ryan Daniel Smith profile image
      Author

      Ryan Smith 4 years ago

      I had to edit it a little because i missed a few points, so you might wanna read it again lol

    • Williamkosko profile image

      William Joseph Kosko 4 years ago from Baltimore, Maryland

      Yup. I agree. If we continue to acknowledge racism and other things by adding laws to separate them or give more rights.. We are only fueling the fire and it will never go away.

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      Eric 3 years ago

      Just stumbled across this, and I agree. I think that designating an individual month to celebrate black history creates two problems: 1. It makes it seem as though we only need to celebrate black people for 1/12th of the year and can ignore them the rest of the time, and 2. It deliberately points out that black people are somewhat different.

      Now, have black people had to face different kinds of (and arguably greater) adversity than other (and by other, I really mean white) people in the US? Yes. Should it be acknowledged that, over the years, they have had to deal with huge human rights issues simply because of their race? Yes. My point is that you can acknowledge past differences and celebrate the fact that they were overcome without making it seem as though these people are somehow "different" even today. The solution is to teach and discuss "black history" at the same time as we talk about "white history;" in the end, it really is all just plain old history.

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