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What Do You Really Know About "Slugging" and "Killing?"

Updated on July 27, 2015
Madison Bumgarner "slugs" five beers at once.
Madison Bumgarner "slugs" five beers at once.

Honestly, have YOU ever "Slugged" an alcoholic beverage?

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"Hey, bud! 'Kill' this Dr Pepper!"

If someone walked up to you with a beer and asked you to "kill this beer," what would you do? Please do not tell me that you would start running and frantically looking for a gun to put a bullet in the Bud? Are you serious? A better question: Are you a well-educated guy or girl in their early 20's with a great job, single, and a great future head of you?

I asked that last question in great hope that the term "well-educated" would lend some needed-credibility to you actually knowing that this ageless term, "kill," (a beverage) really means. In fewer words, I was giving you some benefit of the doubt.

Poor girl. She is completely making a fool of herself  "slugging" the wrong way.
Poor girl. She is completely making a fool of herself "slugging" the wrong way.

Do YOU feel that "Slugging" is popular in 2015?

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I "killed" (a) Coke as a lad.

I learned what "kill" means as a lad as I sat one day listening to my dad who has enjoying himself (with his favorite drink: black coffee) talk about his days in the Army and other things that were important to him. I, myself, was enjoying an original Coca Cola, those that were in the small bottles. I think I had around four sips left and my dad suddenly laughed and said, "kill that, Coke, Kenny," and I never wanted to do anything more in my life than to "kill" the remaining Coke in the small bottle--to just please my dad.

The quick-consumption of the Coca Cola burned my throat, but I did it. And boy, was I proud. So was my dad who patted me on the back and laughed as he went back into the house to get ready to back to the fields he had been plowing before lunch.

And for the rest of that day and half of the next day, I strutted around like a Louisiana cock-fighting rooster on steroids thinking to myself, "I did it. I 'killed' a Coke!" That would be enough to impress any kid of my age.

1950's beer ad shows this actor smiling into this beer which is wrong. You can get a bad case of hiccup's doing this.
1950's beer ad shows this actor smiling into this beer which is wrong. You can get a bad case of hiccup's doing this.
Holding up your beer to others can lead to you spilling your beer on yourself and then being laughed at.
Holding up your beer to others can lead to you spilling your beer on yourself and then being laughed at.
This style of drinking is wrong on so many levels that it is not even funny.
This style of drinking is wrong on so many levels that it is not even funny.
Bumgarner strikes again.
Bumgarner strikes again.
This is an elderly "sluggist," one who knows how to "slug" beer correctly.
This is an elderly "sluggist," one who knows how to "slug" beer correctly.
What a vulgar display of guzzling beer.
What a vulgar display of guzzling beer.
The entire pitcher? Rank amateur.
The entire pitcher? Rank amateur.

The term "Slugger" explained:

The term, "slugger," does not pertain to those who "slug" beer, wine, and other alcoholic beverages every opportunity that comes along.

No.

This term, "slugger," is only applicable to a Major League Baseball player who specializes in hitting many, many home runs in any given game.

Just know your terms.

"Slugging": The evolution is arguable

Honestly I don't know which came first "slug" or "kill," but there had to be an evolution of the two words for I have heard people who were angry at someone else for getting drunk spouting, "Go ahead, idiot! Slug that whiskey down like water!" I can see why people used "slug" instead of "kill" in this instance for "slug" gives the person doing the drinking quite the tainted character aside from his boozing.

For the next little while I want to share with you this sensitive-yet-educational piece entitled

What Do You Really Know About "Slugging" and "Killing?"

Reasons Why People "Slug" Alcohol or Any Beverage:

Pride and Prestige--Imagine getting to brag to your friends (when you get sober), "Hey, friends! I 'slugged' 22 beers last night at the Moose Lodge." Suddenly you are no longer "Jim," a common guy, but "Jim, Slick Slugger," a man of honor and celebrity status.

Proving--That "you" can live-up to your words, "I can out-slug anyone in this bar anytime or anywhere." These are powerful and dangerous words, but you had the nerve to step-up, or "belly up" to the crowded bar and out-slug a group of 10 beer guzzlers on a hot summer night in July and did not pass out.

Getting Attention--That was never given to them as a child. Face it. Wouldn't you rather watch a guy "slug" a fifth of whiskey without vomiting (when he finished), than long, drawn-out shows on PBS about antiques?

Letting Loose--With friends. I know that this "slugging" has alcohol at the center of the activity, but if some men prefer, they can substitute a soda instead of alcohol. But that eliminates the danger and suspense that accompanies "slugging."

Dangers That Go With "Slugging":

Over-crowding--One's stomach causing the digestive system and kidneys work twice as hard to digest the alcohol and if one's bodily systems are not "up to snuff," this game of "slugging" can lead to a stroke or massive heart attack. So you see, "slugging" is not for sissies.

The Alcoholism Road--Starts with several and very frequent "slugging" events to keep your manly-pride intact. One weekend "slugging" victory and before you know it, you are "slugging" at home as practice for the next big "slugging" event. Then you wake up one day and find that you are addicted to alcohol and it's first-cousin, "slugging."

Personal Loss--Is always a highly-probable factor when you love to "slug" beer or whiskey with friends for fun or for winning a trophy or cash. What wife is going to stay with her "slugging" husband when this "slugging" is all he is interested in? Not many. Especially a smart wife who watches her husband lose most "slugging" challenges and she has to drive him home and listen to his slurred speech and making excuses for his "slugging" losses. "Awwww, a gnat got in my mouth before I could get started 'slugging' real good, babe," is one of his awful excuses.

Social Affects of "Slugging":

People view people who love to "slug" beer or other alcoholic beverages as "closet alcoholics."

Jealousy will rear it's spinning head and bite the people who cannot "slug" to save their lives and before long, these jealous friends will quickly be "ex" friends.

Loss of employment can happen to the best "sluggers." And none of them were drinking on their jobs. Some were just terminated on the possibility that they could "slip" one day at lunch and go wild with some quick "slugging" of cold beer they have sneaked into the cafeteria to "slug" with their pals.

Physical harm as well as mental, psychological harm can be attributed to "slugging." These dangers cannot be avoided and there is no good hiding place to keep from facing them. If you are a determined "slugger," you only have two choices: One, "slug" until you cannot "slug" anymore and two, stop the "slugging" at once, cut your losses and live the rest of your life as a sober, healthy, non-"slugger."

And for the record, I never competed in any "slugging" competitions. I was a selfish-"slugger." I loved my beer so much that I did not want to share it with those "sluggers" who lived to drink-up everyone elses beer and go home.

German Chancellor, Angela Merler, has beer spilled on her back.

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    • kenneth avery profile imageAUTHOR

      Kenneth Avery 

      3 years ago from Hamilton, Alabama

      Hi, annart,

      You are right. Now there is a fact that I am glad to know that ducks like to eat slugs. My situation is: I cannot afford ducks, geese, or any fowl to take care of the slugs for I am on a fixed income--and my money is earmarked for medicine, bills, etc.

      Thank you for your interesting comments. I do enjoy reading them.

      Have a peaceful day.

      Your Friend for Life, Kenneth

    • annart profile image

      Ann Carr 

      3 years ago from SW England

      Trouble is, they eat the veg and some flowers' leaves! Ducks love to eat them (slugs, that is, not snails - too crunchy!).

    • kenneth avery profile imageAUTHOR

      Kenneth Avery 

      3 years ago from Hamilton, Alabama

      Hi, annart,

      I tried the old principle of applying a pinch of salt to their back to see what would happen, and sure enough, it dissolved it. But one is all I did for I do not like to take life. Even from snails.

      I guess for a male, I am an old softie.

      I enjoy talking to you, Ann.

    • annart profile image

      Ann Carr 

      3 years ago from SW England

      Slug, for us, is the snail without the shell. They are a bigger pest than the snail because they seem to eat more things!

      Ann

    • kenneth avery profile imageAUTHOR

      Kenneth Avery 

      3 years ago from Hamilton, Alabama

      Hi, annart,

      Thank you so very much for your educational comment.

      By educational I mean, you used the word, 'slug,' to allow the drink to slowly move down the throat like in the movement of a slug, or what we call a snail.

      But even in our area, we have slugs, those creatures without shells that crawl along a damp part of a wall at night and are tough to get rid of.

      I enjoy hearing from you, ann.

      Come back anytime. You are always welcome.

    • annart profile image

      Ann Carr 

      3 years ago from SW England

      Still not quite sure what 'slugging' means but I guess it's downing a drink in one go; at least, it's something like that here. I'm not well acquainted with the practice, of course, but 'slug it back' usually means downing a shot of whisky, brandy or the like, meaning just letting it slide down your throat (as a slug slides along I suppose).

      The other meaning of 'slug' here is to hit, as your baseball term shows. We don't have the word 'slugger'.

      Strange how words differ across the pond; that's the second one I've come across today!

      Ann

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