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What's Wrong With Society These Days ll

Updated on December 17, 2011

How Can We Tell Them?

They fought for us, dies for us and suffered for us. Now, we have to tell them that they'll be lucky to work for minimum wage?
They fought for us, dies for us and suffered for us. Now, we have to tell them that they'll be lucky to work for minimum wage?

How Can We Tell Them Differently?

Young people, mainly comprising the age group of 18 to 34 years of age, haven't had such a bleak outlook on their future since the great depression, the world wars or the Spanish Inquisition (watch out for those comfy chair tortures!). What are they going to do with their lives? Join the military? A monastery? A monastic military? A masonic military? Getting the picture yet? With a great decrease in the need for young people to throw their bodies in the way of flying bullets and roadside explosives, a great many young people are about to find themselves unemployed. Their basic skill sets will include killing Taliban insurgents, burying their friends and lots and lots of walking in a vast desert heat.

Someone has to tell not only returning soldiers that they are coming back to likely unemployment and possible careers flipping burgers at the Dew Drop Inn (formerly Burt's Burnt Burgers), but the children who are going through high school, college and university, spending hundreds of thousands of dollars on diplomas. Most of these diplomas will do not much more than fill the inside of a nice picture frame. Sure, some will get jobs, mostly in penitentiaries, fast food and semi-legal security firms like Blackwater, but the students have a completely different dilemma; they need to figure out not only which fields will be hiring when they graduate, where they can make good money (health care) and be happy (not health care). The problem again arises that there will be a few thousand people applying for each good job that opens up.

Motivational speakers go to colleges, universities and high schools all the time, espousing that all it takes is the drive to succeed in order to make it in life, Wrong! They need nepotism. They need contacts, spotless records and that Hollywood caliber smile.

How can we tell them differently? How can we tell students that their futures are not going to be filled with debt counseling, run-down apartments and collection agencies calling them at 7 in the morning?

How can we tell them differently? How can we tell returning soldiers, in the same breath, that we appreciate the sacrifices that they have made, and that the job line starts over at the Donut Shoppe?

How can we tell them differently? How can we look in our own children's eyes and honestly tell them that the world is their oyster, that they can do whatever they put their mind to? How can we live with ourselves knowing that unemployment is pegged to be as high as 20% by 2020 in North America?

How can we tell them that we've done more irrevocable damage to the planet in the last 75 years than mankind and nature combined have done since the planet first formed an atmosphere?

How can we tell them that we've replaced the need for people to work by making robots to do the work for us?

How can we sleep at night knowing that we slept at night while the powers that be slept at night while scientists and engineers designed automated factories that do the job of thousands of workers for the cost of ten? How do we tell them that these robots don't even make money?

If you know, let me know, please? Because I really have no idea, and dread the thought of what will happen when so many graduate students from school, or when so many soldiers who luckily come back alive from wars are faced with menial, minimum wage jobs, if they're lucky.

Where Do We Get The Money?

One way to get money for everything society needs.
One way to get money for everything society needs.

Just Because we Can't Afford It?

When soldiers come back from the war, after all of them have returned, how do we tell them that they only have a couple of years of medical benefits before they are on their own? How do we tell them that we can't help to take care of them because we had to bail banks out with Billions (almost Trillions) of dollars? That we spend about a Billion dollars a week on our military's infrastructure; the ships, vehicles and tanks, the new and aged planes, drones, and research and development for better ways to kill more people with fewer bombs?

Just because we can't afford it just doesn't seem right here. Maybe we swallowed that line when the government told us that if we didn't bail out the car companies with a couple of Billion bucks. Maybe we let it pass that banks got almost a Trillion dollars, yet their executives take home a hundred million a year in bonuses alone. But we should never let it pass that a soldier is left to his own when he gets sick?

What's wrong with society these days?

Now, We have to be Honest While Doing This!

What can we tell soldiers and students about their future job prospects?

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    • Marc Babineau profile image
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      Marc Babineau 5 years ago from Cornwall, Ontario, The Seaway City

      Aaron - if ever there was someone who could say "I sympathize" with your medical condition, it is me. I had 3 discs removed in my lower spine, i have 7 herniated discs, all inoperable. I have bone spurs attached to the sciatic nerve bundle via scar tissue, again inoperable - here, under my health plan. I could go to Germany to get fixed, but at a cost of $85,000... so could you.

    • profile image

      Aaron Nelson 5 years ago

      Very passionate Marc. As a former vet, and one who is going through some health issues, I can absolutely relate. I have a massive ruptured disk in my neck, along with bone spurs along my spine that is literally closing around my spinal cord. One wrong move and I'm a rag doll. It takes 3 months to get an appointment to see a regular practice doc, let alone a specialist or something.

      It's absolutely unconscionable. The apathy of the whole system is frustrating, to say the least. At least those bank execs get their cool Million right?

    • Marc Babineau profile image
      Author

      Marc Babineau 5 years ago from Cornwall, Ontario, The Seaway City

      Thanks for dropping by, RJ and Nigel...

      Did I step on a landmine with this blog? It seems that no matter who you talk to, unless of course they are politicians, they are dead set against government spending on military exercises and setting things straight in other countries, like Afghanistan and all the other "an's"... if they were to spend 1% (there's that number again!) of their warfare budgets on social programs and health benefits for the soldiers who actually put their lives on the line in those warfare exercises (we can't call them wars now! They are "exercises" and "police actions"), we might actually have more people signing up for the services - who wants to go and fight for their country when they see how the injured and mentally affected soldiers returning from combat are treated. And then there's the not so minor problem with the dead soldiers' families, being told to leave the bases within 90 days of the soldiers' deaths...

      Gads, what's wrong with society these days?

    • profile image

      R. J. Lefebvre 5 years ago

      marc,

      You have some gruesome facts to share with our soldiers and others without a future. I voted for 'keep your heads up' feeling by suggesting anything negative is like burying them in there place. Or, join Occupy Wall Street in the interest of all Americans who are without, and those within the top 1% to recognize they are the cause of the negative state of fellow Americans; then again, do they care?

      Ronnie

    • profile image

      Nigel Lewis-Davidson 5 years ago

      I like millions of others are totally perplexed by the way our taxes and wealth are distributed but unfortunately like millions of others I have no answer to resolve the problem. It wouldn't be so bad if those billions given to support the car companies meant that the car companies supported the vets and youngsters desperate for jobs.

      Nigel

    • Marc Babineau profile image
      Author

      Marc Babineau 5 years ago from Cornwall, Ontario, The Seaway City

      I grew up in the military, my father a pilot for 28 years. He flew Lancasters and Hercules, flew in the Korean conflicts and in Vietnam as a Red Cross hospital plane, delivering ambulances, medical gear etc and bringing back the dead and injured. He had a minor heart attack, successfully recuperated, and then they let him go - they offered him a desk job at a 20% pay cut - at the time he left the forces in 1972, he was making less than $35K a year. He was not given any golden handshakes, but they did insist that he return his kits - both arctic and desert survival. He had numerous friends in the forces, American and Canadian, and many became disabled in the service to their countries - and, let to fend for themselves after being forced out.

      It's a good thing that things have changed for the good (pun intended), but not good enough!

      Thanks for dropping by, Red!

    • Ann Marie Dwyer profile image

      Ann Marie Dwyer 5 years ago from South Carolina, USA

      In fact, the only thing they are told is to get off the plane or the base. It is shameful we treat our veterans this way, yet extol the ___________ (do not know what goes in the blank) of the Lohans and Kardashians?

      Red

    • Richard Sirota profile image

      Richard Sirota 5 years ago from Allentown, PA.

      I have a good friend who is a vet. He is on disability so at least he can eat even if he can't get around well!