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Your Privilege Blinds You: What Is It Like Growing up With White Skin in a Multiracial Ethno-Diverse Family?

Updated on June 13, 2020
Kyler J Falk profile image

Social issues can only be remedied by a collective acceptance of those opinions we view as opposing our own.

Racism comes in many forms, from all colors and backgrounds, towards all colors and backgrounds.
Racism comes in many forms, from all colors and backgrounds, towards all colors and backgrounds. | Source

When people look at me they don't see my heavily diverse, non-white ethnicity; they see a white-skinned man living in a world where standing against racism does not apply when it is against anti-white sentiments. In my article, "Why Are Americans So Racist?" I attempted to draw attention to the issue of anti-white racism being brushed under the rug as acceptable. Nonetheless, I sit here and wonder still, "When will my voice against racism matter, if not now in the time when racism is said to be one of the greatest evils being faced by modern men and women?"

My skin color does not dictate the validity of my anti-racist sentiments, nor does anyone else's!

You're not actually acknowledging racism, and that's the whole point of all of this. It's not about you (white people). No one is trying to silence white people. If you want to be an ally, you have to listen to what POC are saying. They say that "all lives matter" diminishes what they're trying to do. Acknowledging white privilege doesn't mean that you haven't suffered. It means you haven't suffered because of your race.

— Anonymous inspiration for this article

Are You Really Anti-Racist?

The reason I support the, "all lives matter," slogan over the, "black lives matter," slogan is not because I wish to diminish people of color; nor is it because I am ignorant of the history of people of color. I support, and will continue to support, "all lives matter," because the supporters of all lives matter are willing to let me speak out against all forms of racism whenever they occur. Most often, the privileged racist white people who support black lives matter would rather me be silenced simply because of my skin color.

Just recently a woman had told me that we—white people—need to open up the field for other voices of other cultures. It baffled me that my skin color was somehow a symbol for what culture I follow, according to this ignorant woman, when I come from a more diverse family than most Americans. This scenario led me to ask myself, and others, "Is skin color relevant to your contribution to racism and anti-racism, or is it only your actions that matter?"

I've settled on and will not be budging from the idea that, "Skin color is of no importance in social and political matters. Racism is racism, and your actions are what matter, the content of your character and not the color of your skin."

We are all one, regardless of our outside appearance.
We are all one, regardless of our outside appearance. | Source

My Ancestry May Be More Diverse Than Yours

The only part of my family that can, in any ethnic sense of the word, be called white would be my father's side of the family. His side of the family is a bunch of German and Dutch people who, arguably, have had nothing to do with the racism in America because they've been peasants and ranchers their whole lives—and they still are—with no sway over legislation because they don't even vote. Funnily enough, I also get some Navajo from them as well because my grandmother's ancestors on that side were raped by Dutch settlers; rape which led to the production of my immediate ancestry today.

My mother's side of the family is Native American, Italian, and Jewish; a very strange mix by many standards but very diverse nonetheless. You see, my family fled Marino, Italy before the German invasion during WWII and made it to America just before the Battle of San Marino. Being a Jewish sect of what is now the Marinello family, they felt it was their duty to flee before the Nazi regime could catch them.

Settling down in America, entering through the east coast and heading west from there, they had a son—my grandfather—who married a catholic woman of Native American and German descent.

As my father was only consistently present in my life up to about the age of maybe four, my mother remarried and I was predominantly raised in a Catholic Spanish, Mexican, Native American family. My two brothers are brown-skinned and look nothing like me, and that side of the family numbers in the hundreds. There were many African Americans within that family as well; this was due to the Americanizing of their Spanish and Mexican roots.

To say I grew up in a diverse family is putting it excessively lightly, and to claim I have never experienced racism or discrimination because of my skin color is not only prejudicial, but racist and ignorant.

My white skin has seen me silenced for most of my life, but I've risen above it and no one will ever suppress me with racism again! Just because your skin is white, it doesn't mean you can't stand and fight!

— Kyler J. Falk

Prejudice and Racism Have Always Been Directed Toward Me

During the time I was growing up, and even now, prejudice and racist individuals have tried to silence me because of the color of my skin. Right now I have gone out of my way to point out anti-white racism and most of what I received in return is the same thing I have received all my life because of my skin color.

What is it I received in return for my anti-racist sentiments? I received more racism and prejudicial discrimination.

As you can now see, if you gave me the respect of reading up to this point, I come from a family of all colors, creeds, nationalities, and ethnicity. Being white-skinned, even within my family, was an extremely difficult life to live. However, I want to point out that it was my other-than-white family, and my diverse peers who made this the most difficult. If it wasn't my family wondering why my mother and I were even allowed at their events, it was my peers at school constantly berating me for having a mixed family.

My cousins would regularly discuss my skin color with me and why it was I didn't belong in the family. Though I regularly spoke out against racism, even as a child, people tried to teach me that, "my people," are the reason for all the bad things in America. Even further, I was denied access to many different racial groups based on my skin color and my mixed family alone, up until college when I realized that the world was going to be racist no matter how anti-racist I was so I gave up trying to fit in with anyone.

I didn't want to go into detail other than my family tried to disown me for my skin color, my skin had me labelled a racist without even speaking, and I was denied access to ethnic groups to which I fit in by description but I'll revisit my experiences with racism a little more. I've been the victim of gang violence because of my skin, denied access to gym equipment because of my skin, told I cannot sit in certain areas because of my skin, told I cannot speak because of my skin, told that racism against me is not possible because of my skin.... I can go on and on, and I could go on in strict detail of the blood and tears spilled by me and because of me. I fought against racism at every turn, whereas racism had me right beneath its boot, cold and alone as it still does. Where others get readily supported by a majority, I have to fight tooth and nail to prove my white skin doesn't mean I'm not a victim of racism.

Having been told my skin color makes me and my family racist and overall an inherent problem, my own family as a majority trying to disown me from them because of my skin color, and my peers throwing a chaotic amount of racism at me for all facets of my diverse background; I've decided that the only solution to the inherent racism in most everyone is to fight against it regardless of outcome!

Have you ever been discriminated against, or witnessed discrimination due to race?

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Don't let anyone keep you down, no matter what!
Don't let anyone keep you down, no matter what! | Source

Always Strive to Fight Harder!

This last message isn't just to the whites, nor the blacks, reds, yellows, khakis.... My final message is to the world, a world that regularly silences everyone because of skin color. I want you to stop and take a second to ponder what it is you have done to silence someone who was only trying to cry for help, to seek justice for injustices committed against them.

Systemic racism doesn't just target a single race, nor does it target even a small subset of ethnicity and race. Systemic racism is an oppression that targets each and every one of us at some point in our lives, regardless of whether you are aware of it or not. Those of us who are aware, we are suffering and when we cry for help we don't want our throats to be stood upon so as to push a narrative that silences us.

All lives matter is not a way to say that any other life is less meaningful, that we wish their struggle to be diminished so our own can shine.

No, all lives matter is as it states: It is the support of all lives, regardless of color, creed, nationality, gender, etc.

It is a cry for help in the oppressive chaos that is billowing the smoke of petulant fires all around the world. I'm tired of choking on that smoke, and I'm tired of my skin color making people think it is okay that I'm choking.

Please, don't be afraid to speak up! Stand and fight for everyone's rights to a voice and justice!

Comments

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  • Kyler J Falk profile imageAUTHOR

    Kyler J Falk 

    6 weeks ago from Corona, CA

    Unfortunately, Rodric, even speaking of my ancestry at work has had me threatened with termination. People see a white person discussing anything other than football and beer, and they automatically assume it must come from a racist place. Standing up for myself only turns the situation worse for me, as the majority sees in color and white is considered by most to be the evilest of them all.

    I've learned to keep mostly silent about my struggles, but fortunately I am able to write about them and no one can stop me.

    As for fair-skinned blacks, I've sat and discussed the dark-skinned/light-skinned racism that has occurred within the black community with my friends for hours (friends of color, if that matters). The first time I ever heard about it I was baffled as to how they saw anyone as more equal or less equal when they have nearly the same roots, let alone both being humans and being deserving of equal treatment; but even further I was astounded to learn that light-skinned blacks and dark-skinned blacks had arguments going as far back as what roles they were assigned to during slavery and indentured servantry.

    I greatly appreciate your recognition, and willingness to step outside of our current reality to acknowledge my story and writing. Also, once again: I'm going to self-identify my auditory and visual processing disorder right now. If you feel I've missed something in our conversation, or didn't answer it, I ask that you repeat the question clearly and concisely because I'm probably unable to comprehend what is being asked.

  • Rodric29 profile image

    Rodric Anthony 

    6 weeks ago from Peoria, Arizona

    "It is difficult to live in a skin color that does not reflect the suffering of my ancestors, and even more difficult when no one is willing to listen..."

    That was a ponderous admission because I don't understand it fully. What a disconnect from the present and past that must feel like for you! If you write from that place of challenge, I pray that you do not live in that place. This is when it helps to compartmentalize in my opinion. I pray that you keep your perspective.

    As a Black person with mixed ancestry, I wonder if those first fair skinned Blacks had any doubt of how they were viewed, especially the ones who could pass as some other race. The chose not to, however.

    It would be so easy for you to deny how you feel and adjust to not living as yourself, your true self. I respect you for your willingness to stand by your heart and write about it. I hope to read more things from your point of view.

  • Kyler J Falk profile imageAUTHOR

    Kyler J Falk 

    7 weeks ago from Corona, CA

    Thank you for bringing this to my attention, AB, and I'll be sure to go and check out James's article. I've read a lot of his stuff before and really enjoy his style, but I've been falling behind in my reading and writing because of work and all this chaos in the world. If there is any positive to the chaos, then I'm finding it in the increase of contract work.

    I appreciate the kind words and recognition for my writing, it is in direct contrast with the majority who see this as a racist and ignorant piece, and you shine as a beacon of hope for me in a sea of hateful individuals.

  • abwilliams profile image

    A B Williams 

    7 weeks ago from Central Florida

    Hi Kyler,

    I just read the article, Black Lives Matter, by James A. Watkins. It's a very well done, powerful and in depth article, which I recommend all read.

    As a result of me reading his article, your article was brought to my attention.

    Yours is well done, with an important message and I will recommend it to others to read, as well.

  • Kyler J Falk profile imageAUTHOR

    Kyler J Falk 

    8 weeks ago from Corona, CA

    I appreciate your recognition, Ann, and much of the time people do not want to listen for the reason I have listed here and throughout my exploration of racism. That reason is that most people, at least the most vocal, believe that it is not possible for white people to be silenced by, nor suffer from racism. If only that were true and I could rest easy on my inherent white privilege, a phrase I've come to loathe deeply.

    Thank you for reading!

  • annart profile image

    Ann Carr 

    8 weeks ago from SW England

    I think the talking and listening part of your last comment is the most important. Many are all to quick to assume they understand what the next person thinks or feels and that's dangerous.

    All lives matter; black, white and all colours in between, above and beyond. Each person is entitled to be heard, to be understood and not have to face prejudice in any form. Until we all understand that, there will be no peace, no lack of prejudice, no lack of bigotry.

    It must have been difficult for you in that family situation. It sounds as though you have a rich cultural background so why don't people want to hear more about it and embrace it?

    A contentious subject and you are brave to present it.

    Ann

  • Kyler J Falk profile imageAUTHOR

    Kyler J Falk 

    2 months ago from Corona, CA

    Your recognition is very important to me, Rodric, and I thank you for it. Yes, my sin color has often denied me the ability to share the story of my ancestors as much as it has denied me the right to immerse in my own ethnicity. It is difficult to live in a skin color that does not reflect the suffering of my ancestors, and even more difficult when no one is willing to listen.

    Thank you for being one of the few willing to see past skin color!

  • Rodric29 profile image

    Rodric Anthony 

    2 months ago from Peoria, Arizona

    This is an interesting mini-history and perspective. I think often of those who are reared in situations as were you and how they view the world. I see your point, though I think because of the way you look people might just assume you could keep quiet and fit into White privilege and be invisible to most racism. That would be denying who you are, though. Thank you for sharing.

  • Kyler J Falk profile imageAUTHOR

    Kyler J Falk 

    2 months ago from Corona, CA

    I'm asking others to stop associating my mostly non-white ancestors with the responsibility for racism and racist systems. My ancestors are, as an overwhelming majority, the victims who only toiled under the system. This is the problem I have, if my ancestors were responsible for its creation then so were the blacks, yellows, reds, khakis... my skin color does not dictate my family's affiliation to power. I'm responsible to push for the end of these systems, as we all are, nothing more and nothing less. I'm fighting these generalizations based on race, not arguing against our (the human race's) responsibility to end these racist systems.

    Unlike most other families, the privilege which my peasant/slave ancestors had was that they served the wealthy and had their stories immortalized so I could trace their oppression throughout the ages. As far back as Egypt, my family have been slaves and those who were not (or their histories totally lost except to speculation) appear to have stemmed from slave tribes as well. My privilege lies in my family's ability to serve loyally as dogs, not create the system that saw them toil in oppression like everyone still does. This is the source of my irritation, and to invalidate the story of my family with falsities is prejudice, doing it for my skin color is racist.

    If this article makes you feel I was discussing anyone other than my own experiences, and my lack of clarity (because this is playing off of previous articles like a series) caused you to see me as speaking out on behalf of others then I apologize sincerely. I was worried about my word count reaching too high, and waxing loquaciously, so I kept this vague in hopes people would dig deeper into my string of articles on this topic. I'll keep this situation in mind, and perhaps forgo being concise in favor of clarity.

    Once again, I hope you don't feel as if I was trying to invalidate your story of racism. I want you to have a voice as well, and I felt that perhaps you were using your story to invalidate mine. After further communication I believe we are reaching a better conclusion and a clearer message from us both. My vagueness always causes these misunderstandings and it needs to be worked on.

    I hold the stance that everyone has experienced racism, the definition alone is so vague and unfair that, technically, BLM is a racist movement. The value we are placing on that word due to our experiences, this is where we are differing and I in no way want to discredit the way you feel. If you say you have not seen it, then surely you have not seen it from the emotional sense. Alas, back to the definition of racism, everyone has seen it in some form regardless of the emotional value we all place on racism.

    I like the way you closed this out, deer rarely killing the wolf, and I'm more than willing to concede that despite my whining tone and experience with racism that I am still the wolf. I'm not so uneducated to see myself as more disadvantaged, but I will say I have always been denied a pack (mostly by others, but very much by my own hand as well). I refuse to side with others on principles best left in the dust, and that sees me turn on allies because I don't know when to adhere to what I disagree with and when is an appropriate to time to stand on conviction.

    Mr. Happy, you always make me think and I always love our conversations. You bring wisdom and grounding to my thoughts, and I would like to believe we always grow each time we talk.

  • Mr. Happy profile image

    Mr. Happy 

    2 months ago from Toronto, Canada

    "I read your story about the "crow" you brought home to your mother, it was unfortunate." - That was one of my grandmas.

    "Saying my race is responsible for all the bad things in America" -

    But I'm not saying that. Why say "all the bad things in America"? - Saying this is a gross exageration and all it does is try to victimize oneself. This was my original comment here: "That would include hurricanes, tornadoes, landslides, natural forest fires, etc. Are white people responsible for all those "bad things"? No. We're not." - We have to be specific in the ways we are helpful, or detrimental to one issue, or another. Generalizations are not helpful.

    "If anyone has a problem with my ancestors they can go dig them up" - This is what You're missing here Amigo: we live in the system created by those people. We don't have to dig them up. We have to CHANGE the system which THEY created and by which we STILL live by today (not completely but in too many ways). They are gone indeed. My racist grandma is gone but the system the likes of her created still exists and we live under those systems. It's like putting the car on cruise control and jumping out. Then, You from the back seat says: "I'm not driving the car. Don't blame me." Nobody is blaming You but the car You are also in car is still moving in the same direction even though the driver is no longer there. Please tell me You get this. It's not You now, it's the system created long, long before You and I were born but under which we live.

    "I've been the victim of gang violence because of my skin, denied access to gym equipment because of my skin, told I cannot sit in certain areas because of my skin, told I cannot speak because of my skin, told that racism against me is not possible because of my skin.... I can go on and on" - See, all of this is completely new to me. Like I said, I have never, ever experienced racism, nor have I seen any white person experiencing racism.

    "At what point does my ethnicity outweigh my skin color (race) and allow me to have a voice? My voice should not matter less because of the color of my skin, and that is the point I've been making." - Nobody's voice should matter less because of their skin colour. And that's where our perception differs. I do not feel anyone ever tried to tell me my voice matters less because I am white. Nobody ever tried to tell me that I can't sit somewhere, or I can;t join a club, or a group, or anything even remotely close to that.

    "The racism I am against here and in my articles is the type to assume white people have not, cannot, do not, and will not experience racism." - I do not assume that white people cannot experience racism. I just never experienced it and have never, ever seen even traces of it with my own eyes in North America, or Europe. On the other hand, racism against black people, native people, Chinese people, gypsies (which even by using this word "gypsy" is problematic nowadays and betrays parts of my past lol), etc. I have witnessed many, many times.

    So, not to say that a deer cannot kill a wolf. It can but it usually doesn't. That's all I am trying to say lol

    All the best to You and thank You for the conversation!

  • Kyler J Falk profile imageAUTHOR

    Kyler J Falk 

    2 months ago from Corona, CA

    I'm happy you feel that way, Bushra, but many in this country believe it does or directly associates me with racism. My skin color is a signal to people that somehow my ancestors must have been slave owners (which isn't true for most white individuals) or contributed to oppression of what most would consider more-ethnic races throughout history.

    America is a strange place that touts many virtues while having almost none to speak of in reality. Only those standing for justice, fighting against racism in every shape, form, and color can claim to uphold the virtues of America.

  • Bushra Iqbal profile image

    Anya Ali 

    2 months ago from Rabwah, Pakistan

    Of course your skin color doesn't make you a racist.

  • Kyler J Falk profile imageAUTHOR

    Kyler J Falk 

    2 months ago from Corona, CA

    @Mr. Happy: I'll address this in sections for clarity.

    -If you haven't seen my many examples listed in my previous articles, the story of people telling me I am racist because of my skin color within this article, then you didn't read. I ask you to go back, bring back the definition of racism both legal and colloquial, and reassess. I read your story about the "crow" you brought home to your mother, it was unfortunate.

    -By your own admission here, you undid what you said about not seeing any examples of racism against me. Saying my race is responsible for all the bad things in America, an example with quotes I've given over and over previously, is by literal definition, racism.

    -If anyone has a problem with my ancestors they can go dig them up and hang their degenerated corpses from the nearest wall, then I'll bring the paint and fuel to desecrate them for their actions further. However, my family is comprised of peasants and you'd be hard-pressed to find any even moderately in my direct bloodlines who fall outside of the titles of peasant/slave. I'm not responsible for the actions of others, unless we want every person to be responsible for every crime their blood ever committed. It isn't logical, nor is it fair.

    -I didn't want to go into detail other than my family tried to disown me for my skin color , my skin had me labelled a racist without even speaking, and I was denied access to ethnic groups to which I fit in by description. I've been the victim of gang violence because of my skin, denied access to gym equipment because of my skin, told I cannot sit in certain areas because of my skin, told I cannot speak because of my skin, told that racism against me is not possible because of my skin.... I can go on and on, and I could go on in strict detail of the blood and tears spilled by me and because of me. I fought against racism at every turn, whereas racism had me right beneath its boot cold and alone as it still does. Where others get readily supported by a majority, I have to fight tooth and nail to prove my white skin doesn't mean I'm not a victim of racism.

    -Watch the F-word, and in America it targets everyone. I won't speak on behalf of nations I've never resided in as a form of permanency.

    -I'll acknowledge any racist facet of my ancestry, however, I will call out anyone who says my ancestry is racist strictly because of my skin color. That is racist, prejudice, and disgusting. I have more slaves and peasants in my family than I do racists. I have more POC in my ancestry than I do whites. At what point does my ethnicity outweigh my skin color (race) and allow me to have a voice? My voice should not matter less because of the color of my skin, and that is the point I've been making.

    The racism I am against here and in my articles is the type to assume white people have not, cannot, do not, and will not experience racism. The type I speak for is the type I can experience myself and do experience myself. It just isn't true in any capacity. It is racist.

  • Kyler J Falk profile imageAUTHOR

    Kyler J Falk 

    2 months ago from Corona, CA

    @Bushra: That's where the problem comes in, Bushra, I do not feel confident that I can make a difference because my white skin makes people see a racist where there is not one. Where I say to stop being racist against white people, and point the finger at those who would have us fight each other; people see me as saying that the black message should be put aside for an "all lives matter" message. Though I will not promote black lives matter without also promoting all lives matter, that is not what I am saying but it is how I am perceived.

    At the end of the day I speak out in the hopes that others will be brave enough to stand against the majority, that they will know I support them no matter their message and color, because I am a firm believer that every life, no matter the color of it, matters.

  • Mr. Happy profile image

    Mr. Happy 

    2 months ago from Toronto, Canada

    "Right now I have gone out of my way to point out anti-white racism" - But I have yet to read an example of racism against You for being white. I personally have never experienced racism as a white guy. I have been racist, I grew-up like that. As I mentioned in someone's article a couple of days ago, I was a most extreme sort of racist too: if You were not white AND Romanian, the world could have opened-up and swallowed You up and I could gave cared less. Actually being Hungarian, or Russian, or Turkish, it would have been way worse that being coloured.

    "my people," are the reason for all the bad things in America - See? Here is the problem. Why say "all the bad things in America"? That would include hurricanes, tornadoes, landslides, natural forest fires, etc. Are white people responsible for all those "bad things"? No. We're not. Is our race responsible for the enslavement of black people and the genocide against Native Americans, in the creation of the United States of America? For sure: 101%.

    That's what we got to own: our history. And sure please don't blame Romanians for any Imperial conquests. We never went pillaging other nations to create an Empire but I realize many of my fellow white people did: the French, the British, the Portuguese, the Germans, the Russian, the Italians, the Greeks, etc.

    We've been really nasty creatures, we have to admit. We've been murdering each other in Europe with great efficacy for centuries upon centuries. It wasn;t the Native Americans who dropped the bomb on Hiroshima. It was white people. We're just really good at war. We are. We have to admit it. And with that came the enslavement of other people and races. We have to own the history. We have to see where our roots are to understand why we are where we are.

    "I was denied access to many different racial groups based on my skin color" - This is the first instance in your artickle that I get a hint of racism towards You bnut even here there are no details. Were You made to sit at the back of the bus? Did You have to drink water from a different water fountain? Did You have to call a Native man to give You written permission to leave your white Reserve (as Native people had to do)?

    "Systemic racism doesn't just target a single race, nor does it target even a small subset of ethnicity and race." - Ohh yes it does. You're fucked by the system and racism (among other things) in Romania if You're a gypsy.

    So, ya I never-ever experienced racism. And it was a black guy in highschool who did not know my racist background and showed me love, that changed me. It was a life-changing friendship. He's still like my brother I never had. Anyway ... I have white privilage. I know it.

    I thank God all the time for not DWB (driving while black). Sigh ...

    You take care. All the best!

  • Bushra Iqbal profile image

    Anya Ali 

    2 months ago from Rabwah, Pakistan

    I think you should just ignore anyone who tells you you can't speak up against racism if you really do feel there's racism in the USA and that your voice can make a difference.

  • Kyler J Falk profile imageAUTHOR

    Kyler J Falk 

    2 months ago from Corona, CA

    Prejudice is prejudging without prior knowledge, mostly, but regularly (colloquially) tied to race, ethnicity, gender, etc. Also, yes, the media has tried to make, "all lives matter," a contentious phrase that is anti-black lives matter. However, that could be said of so many other innocent words and phrases so I pay them no mind.

    I'd say the only way America is going to get over our racial issues, most of our issues by extension, is to stop letting those in power dictate our behavior and having us fight each other on their behalf.

    Too many facets to the conversation, but as always you bring up amazing points worthy of lengthy explorations from a wide variety of perspectives.

  • CHRIS57 profile image

    CHRIS57 

    2 months ago from Northern Germany

    Kyler, isn´t racism closely linked to prejudice?

    Even the expression: "all lives matter" already is subject to prejudice, as it is put into opposition to "black lives matter". At least as far as i try to understand from the outside.

  • Kyler J Falk profile imageAUTHOR

    Kyler J Falk 

    2 months ago from Corona, CA

    All too real for many of us, Teresa, and that is the very question I have been trying to find the answer to. How do you educate a world that sees in color before it sees in action and example? These riots, perhaps uncalled for in the way they've targeted the equally oppressed, have shown me that protesting through violence captures the attention of the world where peace is met with authoritative violence and further oppression.

    I want to live in a world where we can all be equal, with equal voices and the strength to help those too weak to make themselves heard. We've all suffered in silence for far too long.

    Keep up the good fight, stay knowledgeable, and keep spreading awareness; it's the best we can do in lieu of measurable progress!

  • Teresa Maru profile image

    Teresa Maru 

    2 months ago from Kenya

    Racism is real, but how do we go about educating people who refuse to see or acknowledge the truth of humanity? I guess a block at a time!

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Marketing
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