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Does a judge have the right to change a baby's name


Just recently a Newport, Tennessee court, decided a mother could not name her baby "Messiah." Apparently, Messiah is fast becoming a popular name for a child. The Town of Newport is reputed to consist of a large Christian population and that obviously fed into the judge's decision. The judge stated on the record that the religious name was earned by one person and "that one person is Jesus Christ." Whatever one's religious beliefs, the courts are supposed to divorce themselves of religious decision making and apparently this judge, Child Support Magistrate Lu Ann Ballew, did not.

 
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peeples profile image88

Best Answer Peeples says

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4 years ago
  • Express10 profile image

    H C Palting (Express10) 4 years ago

    I agree with you. I have heard of names like Mercedes, OShaunda, and what not. I feel bad for the kids but they will be able to change their names if they choose to. We've got worse problems that judges should be tending to.


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Catherine Tally (cat on a soapbox) says

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4 years ago
  • RealityTalk profile image

    RealityTalk 4 years ago

    When I was younger, I thought African Americans came up with outlandish names; names that weren't John, Jim or Pam. Now, I love them. I wanted to name a daughter T'Chala, a derivative of an African name. Who r we to decide the rightness of a name?

CraftytotheCore profile image86

CraftytotheCore says

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4 years ago
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    RealityTalk 4 years ago

    I practiced in Family Court for years. The judge has no right to interject her religious beliefs." Best Interests of the Child" has nothing to do with this case. The judge can try to mitigate the damage to her image on TV, but she is wrong.


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Deonne Anderson (ladydeonne) says

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4 years ago
  • CraftytotheCore profile image

    CraftytotheCore 4 years ago

    Amen to that! That's why I say, I can't wait to see the appeal. I just can't imagine this sticking in court.


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lburmaster says

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4 years ago
  • RealityTalk profile image

    RealityTalk 4 years ago

    I agree with you. This ain't Sweden." No U.S. Court should be able to interject their personal religious beliefs into a decision. As long as the child isn't named "Run, there is a bomb and the building is on fire." LOL.

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Paula (fpherj48) says

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4 years ago
  • RealityTalk profile image

    RealityTalk 4 years ago

    Don't take my question too literal. It's not what a judge can do; it is what "can" a judge do. Confusing? Legislation vs Constitutional law. I would hope u would be right about the Supreme Ct., but the S.C. is often politically motivated.


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Vlorsutes profile image90

Vlorsutes says

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4 years ago
  • RealityTalk profile image

    RealityTalk 4 years ago

    Who decides what names are appropriate? That's socialism or a dictatorship. And, any name can be made fun of. Greg/egg. Lucy - that girl is ... You would take away a parent's right to name their child, their creation.

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Diana L Pierce (Diana Lee) says

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4 years ago
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Debra Allen (Lady Guinevere) says

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4 years ago
  • RealityTalk profile image

    RealityTalk 4 years ago

    I love Johnny Cash! Messiah isn't even a holy name; it's a description of the chosen one. And how many Hispanics are named Jesus which is the common name of the messiah. Too many to count.


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Rosana Modugno says

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4 years ago
  • CraftytotheCore profile image

    CraftytotheCore 4 years ago

    I have a relative named Seven. It's actually a common name around here.


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Michael Ward (CrescentSkies) says

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4 years ago
  • RealityTalk profile image

    RealityTalk 4 years ago

    What if I named my child "it's a bomb" or "I've got a gun?" Calling them for dinner might cause a problem. LOL.

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crazymom3 says

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4 years ago
  • RealityTalk profile image

    RealityTalk 4 years ago

    Actually Family Court has no special privileges to enforce the court's personal religious beliefs on people. I was an attorney in Family Court. This judge was wrong.

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taburkett says

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4 years ago
  • RealityTalk profile image

    RealityTalk 4 years ago

    You are mistaken on Constitutional law. And the judge went beyond what is acceptable. The judge stated religion was why she decided as she did. She said only one was allowed being called Messiah. Read Justice Black & Supreme Ct. decisions.

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CalebSparks says

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4 years ago
  • RealityTalk profile image

    RealityTalk 4 years ago

    But gov. is not allowed to make a decision "based" on their religious beliefs, which is exactly what this judge did. She even put it on the record that that is why she decided the way she did. That is not allowed under our Constitution.


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Lybrah says

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4 years ago
  • RealityTalk profile image

    RealityTalk 4 years ago

    I will read your Hub, but what makes "Alison" an acceptable name? Broke apart it is Ali - like Muhammad & Son - someone's child. It only sounds acceptable to you because u grew up with it. So a stranger can demand u name your child from her list?

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Marie Brannon says

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4 years ago
  • RealityTalk profile image

    RealityTalk 4 years ago

    Google the case for more details; it was on Yahoo this morning. It was a couple before the court arguing the name. The court decided on religious, not secular grounds however. The name was offensive to the court, so the judge chose a name.

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