bradmasterOCcal profile image 57

Do you think that SCOTUS decisions should require more than a simple majority to decide a case.


With a 5-4 decision, 4 SC justices are disregarded while a single vote decides the case. The decision becomes the law of the land, but does that even come close to resolving the issues underlying the case. The Supreme Case always has the option to not hear a case, and that may be better than coming up with a contest simple majority opinion. Shouldn't cases of this magnitude and importance to the country and the people be more decisive than one vote? A simple majority is closer to a coin flip than a well reasoned and intelligent answer?

 

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jackclee lm profile image82

Jack Lee (jackclee lm) says

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21 months ago
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    bradmasterOCcal 21 months ago

    Jack

    The basis of my question was to show how SC decisions don't resolve the issues before the court. Roe v Wade is an example of such a decision. Life time appts were to put the justices out of the reach of undue influence and politics.


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Ericdierker profile image67

Eric Dierker (Ericdierker) says

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21 months ago
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    bradmasterOCcal 21 months ago

    Eric

    Actually the SC is not well designed, in fact under FDR there were 15 jurists. The founders left the details to the congress for the SC.

    We are a Democratic REPUBLIC and majority is the difference.

    I dn have enough characters left!!!


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