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Celebrate Native American Heritage and Honor Living Memories USA

Updated on January 26, 2013

Native American Cultures Past, Present & Future : A Brief Intro

The arrival of European culture was not kind to the indigenous cultures in America. The population of the native civilizations of the current territory of the United States fell from about 20 million to the present level of less than 2 million. Beyond the shrinking size of the ethnic populations, the languages have also suffered, and cultural traditions preserved in art, music and social relationship have slowly dispeared to near extinction, and assimilation.

Howver, knowledge and celebration of such tradition of the still existing Native American cultures are possible when Americans who have roots here more than 3 generations realize that chances are high that some Native American genetic heritage are likely to be living memories in their blood and spirit, to be inevitably passed on to posterity.

In recent years, many Latin American immigrants have brought with them a Native American heritage in their genes and culture that now can create new reasons for celebrating America's Native American Heritage that still survives here, though small as they may be.

In my own case, Though I am a first generation American arriving here with my parents from India, I have gained family and neighborly connections to Native American culture by growing up in North Carolina and living for many years here in Virginia.

Wisdom and enrichment of life by celebrating living Native American cultures for all Americans, whether new or few generations old, through language, arts, music and remembered traditions can enrich us all today and tomorrow.

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Survivial of Native American Language Today ***

Only 8 indigenous languages of the area of the continental United States currently have a population of speakers in the U.S. and Canada large enough to populate a medium-sized town.

Language Family Locations Speakers

Navajo Athabaskan AZ, NM, UT 148,530

Cree Algic MT, Canada 60,000

Ojibwa Algic MN, ND, MT, MI, Canada 51,000

Cherokee Iroquoian OK, NC 22,500

Dakota Siouan NE, ND, SD, MN, MT, Canada 20,000

Apache Athabaskan NM, AZ, OK 15,000

Blackfoot Algic MT, Canada 10,000

Choctaw Muskogean OK, MS, LA 9,211

U.S. State names with native origins

Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, Connecticut, Hawaii, Illinois, Iowa, Kentucky, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Nebraska, (New) Mexico, (North/South) Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Wisconsin, Wyoming.

*** Source: John Rehling's Home Page

www.cogsci.indiana.edu/farg/rehling/nativeAm/ling.html

Photo Album 01__Native American Cultures

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Celebrate  Native American Heritage & Honor Living Memories USA
Celebrate  Native American Heritage & Honor Living Memories USA
Celebrate Native American Heritage & Honor Living Memories USA

Federally Recognized Tribes By State

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U.S. State names with native origins

Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, Connecticut, Hawaii, Illinois, Iowa, Kentucky, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Nebraska, (New) Mexico, (North/South) Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Wisconsin, Wyoming.

Federally Recognized Tribes by State

Federally recognized tribes are those Indian tribes recognized by the United States Bureau of Indian Affairs for certain federal government purposes.

On October 1, 2010, with a supplemental listing on October 27, 2010, the U.S. government's Federal Register issued an official list of 565 tribes in the Federal Register as Indian Entities Recognized and Eligible To Receive Services From the United States Bureau of Indian Affairs, which can be downloaded as a PDF document from the U.S. Bureau of Indian Affairs

Of these tribes, California today has the largest number of Federally recognized tribes with 102 such tribes. Oklahoma has 38, Washington, 29, Arizona, 17 and New Mexico, 21 tribes.

If you live in Virginia like I do, there are no federally recognized tribes here today, but there are still 2 State of Virginia recognized tribes living here. But it is a source of hope for me to notice that of the 95 or so counties existing in Virginia today, many communities are increasingly taking pride in preserving their Native American heritage through local musicians and County Fairs and Town festivals where such heritage are celebrated and knowledge shared with visitors and local residents more so today than in recent past.

Yes, times they are are changin, as the folk singer sang !

Dance !

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From A Native American Memory Book

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YouTube--Twin Project Demo 01 Fairfax VA - Conversations Fairfax Community to Community

Photo Album 02__Related topics

Yea, Dance !

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Inspired By Nature__Cafe Twin - Welcome !

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New Guestbook Comments

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    • profile image

      GentlemenGogoVEVO 5 years ago

      I like reading your article..stars 5 5 for your lens..super!

    • domain19 profile image

      domain19 5 years ago

      awesome lens... thanks for share

    • Gypzeerose profile image

      Rose Jones 5 years ago

      I would love to go to a PowWow. Reminds me - there was a proposal to install a park on Native American burial grounds around here - I'll have to write a letter.

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      waldenthreenet 5 years ago

      @lollyj lm: Glad to know your links to Cherokees. I have studied the Cherokee culture more than all others due their origins here in our region NC and Virginia. Not sure where you live and whether you have any connections to Cherokees in NC or in OK, if you do, may be we do a special project in "Reforestation" if there is leadership and community support. This well strenghten the culture's survivality. Hope you will give some thought to this topic. I will working on improving this lense in future. My Twittter ID: waldenthreenet

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      Laurel Johnson 5 years ago from Washington KS

      My paternal great grandmother was Cherokee. Her legacy lives on in my DNA.

      LOVE this lens.

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      jseven lm 5 years ago

      I greatly honor and appreciate the Native Americans. I listen to a group called "Broken Walls" whose music is awesome.