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FIV Cat Rescue

Updated on April 14, 2016

FIV Cat Rescue

Educating | Advocating | Saving Lives

FIV Cat Rescue is an educational non-profit charity, located in California, devoted to saving the lives of cats who test positive for FIV (Feline Immunodeficiency Virus) antibodies. Most FIV+ cats, if they have homes, will live a normal lifespan. They simply die of age-related diseases.

30+ years after humans freaked over HIV and turned infected people into lepers, they are now passing the stigma onto FIV+ cats -- for exactly the same reasons -- fear of the unknown and lack of good information.

FIV Cat Rescue is working directly with FIV researchers to create programs to inform vets, shelters, rescues and the general public that a single test proves nothing. Testing FIV positive (FIV ) should not be a death sentence. With proper care -- the same care you give to Non-FIV cats -- cats labeled FIV+ can and do live long, healthy, happy lives.

I'll report the latest facts about FIV and what FIV Cat Rescue is doing to save these cats.

FIV does not affect a cat's lifespan or quality of life, and FIV cats can coexist with non-FIV cats without transmitting the virus.

Although we've taken in the FIV+ cats in the past to save them from immediate death, we do not operate a shelter. As a shelter, we could only save a few dozen cats. Through our educational out-reach program, we hope to save thousands. We also help rescuers find homes for FIV cats.

Logo: Yang, one of our rescued FIV cats

Copyright 2012-2016, Frankie Kangas

FIV kitten
FIV kitten

FIV Cat Rescue - How it Began

In 2006, my husband and I had been fostering cats and kittens for 6 years for the local Humane Society. Early that year, we fostered a litter of 4 bottle-feeders, whose mother had abandoned them. As was customary, when the kittens weighed 2 pounds, we took them in to be spayed/neutered.

A few hours later, we received a call that would change our lives. The shelter informed us that the kittens had tested positive for FIV antibodies, so they were euthanized. They were dead. Gone.

We were devastated.

We had heard of FIV, but did not really know what it was. Was it terminal? Was there a cure? How could such healthy, happy kittens have a disease so bad they had to be killed?

We began to vigorously research these issues ... only to find conflicting information. "Facts" were all over the map. Then it became obvious. The date was the data. On the internet, old, out-dated information coexists with later studies. And the latest research of all is not even there yet.

We learned that while it was at first believed that cats testing positive for FIV were doomed, later studies showed the opposite. Tragically, obsolete thinking (we call them myths) had killed "our" kittens.

Even worse, the myths lived on, even as cats around the world did not. The senseless killing had to stop! Thus began our journey into rescuing FIV+ cats and the beginning of FIV Cat Rescue. .

Photo: Copyright 2006-2016, Frankie Kangas

Dedicated to these 4 beautiful kittens - Our devastating introduction to FIV

Click thumbnail to view full-size
FIV Cat Princess
FIV Cat Princess

What is FIV?

FIV is a diagnosis

FIV (Feline Immunodeficiency Virus) is a feline only, lentivirus which progresses very slowly, affecting a cat's immune system. Sometimes, FIV does not even affect a cat at all.

FIV is really no big deal. FIV is so slow to progress that most FIV cats die of old age. Most FIV cats live long, healthy, happy lives when given a home with good care -- the same kind of care you give to your other NON-FIV cats. And, you cannot get FIV from your cat.

FIV is NOT Feline AIDS. It is this untrue stereotype that justifies the barbaric "treatment". Rarely does a cat even reach this stage (some call it Stage 4).

A common myth is that a cat that tests positive for FIV will die young. In fact, most FIV+ cats, if they have homes, will live a normal lifespan. They simply die of age-related diseases.

Photo: Princess

Copyright 2010-2016, Frankie Kangas

Cats who have been vaccinated AGAINST FIV will test positive for FIV antibodies forever!

Our Ultimate Goal

Stop Routinely Killing FIV+ Cats

Our primary mission is to end the out-dated and unjustified killing of cats based of the presence of FIV antibodies.

#1: End the killing of FIV+ cats by educating everyone involved:

> Work with FIV researchers to create the latest FIV educational materials

> Educate vets on the latest research treatments

> Distribute research findings to shelters, so they can update their kill policies based on current research

> Create and maintain a public national US database of shelters, rescues and sanctuaries that accept FIV+ cats

> Provide rescuers and caregivers tools to save FIV+ cats

> Help folks trying to save single FIV+ cats

> Educate the general public about FIV facts.

#2: Provide long-term solutions so "saved" cats lead long, healthy, happy lives:

> Create a "Forever-Home Location System" of networked online resources

> Educate shelters on how to find good homes for these special cats with not-so-special needs

> Promote spay-and-neuter programs to stop over-population, spread of disease, and euthanasia.

#3: Provide dual support roles:

> Save the few: provide information and support for individual FIV+ cats in desperate situations, often certain death is days or hours away.

> Save the many: change the prevailing culture from Kill to Love for all those with a FIV+ diagnosis.

We are a voice for these cats and hope to ultimately save those whose only "defect" is antibodies to a virus, not the actual virus.

Photo: Gypsy

Photo: Copyright 2008, Frankie Kangas

6 Things you should know about FIV - What is FIV and how does it affect cats?

  1. Nursing kittens can carry the antibodies of an infected mother without being infected themselves. In fact, a kitten testing positive should be retested at 6 to 8 months of age.
  2. Cats who have been vaccinated AGAINST FIV will test positive FOR FIV antibodies forever!
  3. The vast majority of FIV+ cats do NOT develop AIDS.
  4. Cats with FIV can live long, healthy lives.
  5. Animal shelters routinely kill cats who test positive for FIV.
  6. Humans do not catch FIV; it is a cat-specific infection.

FIV Cat Tommy
FIV Cat Tommy

How Is FIV Transmitted?

And, How It Is NOT Transmitted

FIV is transmitted through blood transfusions or deep penetrating bite wounds.

Kittens can get it from an infected mother while in the womb or through ingestion of milk during nursing. HOWEVER, kittens rarely get FIV from their mothers. Many inherit their Mom's antibodies to FIV which go away by the time they are 6 months of age. All kittens that test positive for FIV need to be retested after 6 months of age.

The condition is most often seen in unneutered stray or feral males, since fighting is more common among these cats. FIV is not easily passed between cats. It cannot be spread casually - like in litter boxes, water and food bowls, or when snuggling and playing.

A neutered FIV+ cat in a home is extremely unlikely to infect other cats, when properly introduced as long as the cats are all non-aggressive.

Cornell University on FIV:

"The primary mode of transmission is through bite wounds. Casual, non-aggressive contact does not appear to be an efficient route of spreading FIV; as a result, cats in households with stable social structures where housemates do not fight are at little risk for acquiring FIV infections."

Photo: Tommy

Photo: Copyright 2012-2016, Frankie Kangas

Kitten calico
Kitten calico

What is the test for FIV?

FIV Blood Tests

A simple blood test, done in most veterinary clinics or hospitals, called ELISA (Enzyme-lined immunosorbent assay) is used to diagnose FIV (feline immunodeficiency virus). The test only tests for antibodies not the actual virus. Due to many false positives, if a cat tests positive, it should be retested using a Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test.

Kittens test positive because they inherit their mother's antibodies, which are usually gone from their systems by the time they are 6 months old. Therefore, kittens that test positive for FIV antiboides should be retested between the age of 6 and 8 months of age at which time the test will most likely come back negative.

NOTE: Cats who have been vaccinated against FIV will test positive for FIV antibodies. This leads to false readings all of their lives.

Photo: Copyright 2006-2016, Frankie Kangas

FIV is NOT a death sentence!

Most cats who test positive for FIV antibodies

live long, healthy and happy lives.

FIV cat
FIV cat

How to keep an FIV cat healthy

FIV infected cats have compromised immune systems and may be more susceptible to infections and may need to take medicine a little longer than non-FIV cats. As with ALL cats, they need to be neutered (to minimize or prevent fighting), kept indoors (to decrease exposure to other cars, feral cats, dogs, poisons, other outdoor dangers), fed a good diet with vitamin supplements (no raw foods), and have yearly check-ups.

All cats are high strung and prefer no stress in their environment. FIV-infected cats are no different. For ALL cats both preventative health and dental care are important. Administer prescribed medications and monitor your cat's general activity level, body weight, appetite and attitude.

As with all of your animals, IF they start hiding, acting different, not eating or drinking, not using the box or going outside the box, sneezing, or snuffling, then immediately take them to the vet. It's really that simple. FIV+ cats should be aggressively treated for any infections that may occur.

Vaccinations for other diseases should be discussed with your veterinarian.

Photo: Harley (with 1 amber eye and 1 yellow eye)

Copyright 2010-2016, Frankie Kangas

Lysine for FIV+ cats
Lysine for FIV+ cats

What should I feed my FIV+ cat?

Diet for an FIV cat

All cats should be fed good quality food, whether wet or dry. We prefer a combination, as an all-dry food diet can produce skin problems in a few cats and it can lead to urinary tract problems in males because of the ash.

FIV cats should never be fed raw meat, which carries a risk of Toxoplasma gondii infection. This can be a serious problem in FIV cats, simply because their immune systems might be weaker than normal. FIV cats are not particularly fragile; we are simply being proactively protective.

For that reason, if your cat goes outside -- which is not recommended, except for safely enclosed areas -- you should prevent it from hunting.

While not exactly foods, we do add 2 ingredients to the wet food of all cats:

LYSINE

On our Vet's recommendation, we add L-Lysine HCI (Lysine)* daily to their wet food. Lysine, an essential amino acid, is recommended for Herpes and to prevent and combat Upper Respiratory Infection (URI), known in humans as a common cold. We give each cat 250mg a day as a maintenance dose. If they have cold symptoms, we up their dose to 500mg a day for up to a week, then back down to the maintenance dose. We prefer the Lysine crystals to the other forms it comes in. We simply put the Lysine crystals on top of the wet food, add a little water and stir. The crystals melt immediately and the cats don't seem to notice any taste.

* We buy a product called, Pure Lysine, in a 4-lb tub online from Vita Flex Nutrition (Vitaflex.com). It is advertised for horses due to the size of the tub and is the least expensive product we've found. And, for 16 cats, it is necessary to buy in bulk.

NOTE: Lysine has no special properties in relation to FIV "specifically" as far as boosting the immune system, but is recommended for Herpes and for URI prevention in all cats. L-Carnitine is actually more useful as a maintenance supplement for being pro-actively protective as is Lactoferrin.

PUMPKIN

We also add 100% pureed pumpkin (not pie filling) to their wet food. Pumpkin is a good source of fiber and is helpful in several ways:

1. for diarrhea, the pumpkin fiber absorbs the water in a cat's digestive system making their stools firmer.

2. for constipation, the fiber in the pumpkin helps by softening the stools.

3. The fiber also reduces hairballs.

For cats weighing up to 15 pounds, we give 1-2 TEAspoons a day of pumpkin puree. For cats over 15 pounds, we give 1-2 TABLEspoons.

NOTE 1: Some cats do not do well on pumpkin so experiment with amount to see what works for each cat.

NOTE 2: In place of pumpkin, you can use unflavored 100% natural Psyllium husk fiber mixed into their food with a little water. The Psyllium has the same effect as pumpkin. (The brand we use is Equate and comes in a 29 oz container.) Some cats are allergic to fiber and may throw up their food.

Isolation of an FIV+ cat is not necessary in a stable household unless the FIV+ cat is likely to fight with the other residents.

FIV Cat Rescue
FIV Cat Rescue

FIV Cats live with Non-FIV Cats

FIV Cats can live with non-aggressive non-FIV cats

Since 2006, I've had FIV+ cats and non-FIV cats living together in my home -- anywhere from 13 to 18 cats at a time. They lick each other, eat out of each others food bows, drink from the same water bowls and play and sleep together; the disease has NOT been transmitted to any of my non-FIV cat. Also, I have many older cats (7 over 12 years old -- 2 with FIV and 5 without). None of the FIV+ cats have turned into AIDS and none of the non-FIV cats have been infected. So far, all of our FIV cats have lived to be at least 14-yrs old and have died of old age diseases.

30 years after humans got freaked about HIV and turned people into lepers, they are now passing the stigma onto FIV cats -- all for the same reason -- fear of the unknown and lack of good information. We are working very hard to get a grant to tell vets, shelters, rescues and the general public that having FIV should not be a death sentence. That cats that tests positive for FIV antibodies can live long, healthy, happy lives. And they are living in many, many homes.

Cats do not have to die simply for a compromised immune system, which is what FIV is.

===================================

LONG TERM RESEARCH STUDY: FIV living together with Non-FIV cats:

People shouldn’t be afraid of having FIV and Non-FIV cats living together. The virus is passed through a serious, penetrating bite wound (these are extremely rare, except in free-roaming, unneutered tomcats).

The latest, long-term research study (2014 submission) shows that FIV and Non-FIV cats can live together without spreading the virus as long as all are non-aggressive. Research at http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1090023314000847

A good article written about the study is “As It Turns Out, FIV Positive and Negative Cats Can Happily Live Together” http://www.care2.com/causes/as-it-turns-out-fiv-positive-and-negative-cats-can-happily-live-together.html

Photo: Mad Max

Photo: Copyright 2010-2016, Frankie Kangas

Keep Your FIV Cat Healthy

Keep your FIV+ cat healthy by treating her like ALL cats should be treated. 2 things that we stress are: NO raw foods, keep indoor only (all our cats are), and if she seems sick have her treated right away.

FIV cat
FIV cat

Help Us Stop MYTHinformation The Killer of FIV Cats

Please Pledge to Support Our Efforts

We are committed to changing the way FIV+ cats are diagnosed, perceived and treated in this nation and worldwide. We believe that lack of education is the cause of the problem -- and a spread of knowledge will be the solution. No one is willingly doing wrong. There are no evil people here. They simply haven't received the latest medical facts. That is our job, and we have our work cut out for us! Everyday untold numbers of FIV+ cats are mistakenly surrendered to shelters out of fear.

It IS slowly getting better for FIV+ cats, but not fast enough to save the thousands that already died this year, and those whose lives will be in jeopardy in years to come. They need unrelenting advocates to stand up for them. We are committed to doing that, but we can't do it alone. We are stepping up our efforts and hope to gain much ground in 2013. We are asking our FANS and FRIENDS to get in step with our efforts by PLEDGING your support with a monthly subscription. You can help us reach our goals for just pennies a day!

Thank you for caring about these very special cats as much as we do. We hope you will share our message with your FRIENDS. Together, we can raise our voices and stand up for the defenseless!

PLEDGE HERE TODAY

Compassionately,

FIV Cat Rescue

Wear a t-shirt and spread the word about FIV cats - they don't have to die!

Every penny goes to save FIV cats. Thank you!


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spay animation
spay animation

Don't Forget To Spay Or Neuter Your Cat

Neutered Cats Are Healthier And Happier

Having your cat spayed or neutered will stop the overpopulation and the killing of cats. Millions of cats are killed at shelters each year due to overpopulation. Keep in mind, if your cat has 4 kittens, even if you get homes for those kittens, 4 others are killed because they could not get homes.

This wonderful animation was created by David Booth of Cabin Fever Art. Check out his site to see all his wonderful cartoons and other goodies. He also provides the weekly cartoon for Are You Polar Bear Aware?

ASPCA's Low-Cost Spay/ Neuter Resource

Info on low cost spay/ neuter resource

Low-Cost Spay/Neuter Programs

ASPCA has a special link for you to find low-cost spay/neuter programs in your community. Simply go to Low-Cost Spay Neuter Programs and enter in your zip code and you'll get a list of the programs in your area.

Photo: Copyright 2010-2016, Frankie Kangas SnoBall FIV Cat Rescue Mascot

Looking For A Home For An FIV+ Cat?

Here's How to Find a Home For an FIV+ Cat

If you have rescued an FIV cat and cannot keep it, there are a couple of things you can do.

1) Find a home yourself -- run a newspaper ad with a fun story and photos of the cat, put up flyers, post to your Facebook account, send out emails.

2) Call your local shelters and rescues to see if they will find a home for an FIV cat. See

Rescues Taking FIV Cats for a listing by state of groups that take FIV cats.

Do you still have questions about FIV? If so, post them here and I'll get that informaiton for you from the researcher I'm working with or my Vet.

Post Your QuestionsAbout FIV Here - Questions Answered Here

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    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      I am a feral cat colony caretaker. Today I discovered a cat at our feeding station that I have occasionally seen around the area who was obviously injured. I got him in a carrier, took him to my vet, and discovered that he had a number of injuries AND is FIV positive. Once we treat and neuter him, what are your thoughts about being able to release him back to the colony area vs. finding a shelter for him at an FIV-positive shelter - and if you recommend the shelter option, do you have suggestions for places?? Also, do you have research/data regarding current thinking re FIV and your recommendation for return or shelter? I would appreciate a response as soon as possible since he is scheduled for surgery/treatment in the morninng. Thank you so much!!

    • Franksterk profile image
      Author

      Frankie Kangas 4 years ago from California

      @anonymous: See "How to Find a Home For an FIV Cat" the module above this one, Item #2 will take you to the new Squidoo site I created that lists the Rescues that we know of that take FIV cats by state.

      If you cannot find one on the list in your area that will take him, also listed (the module after the Introduction module) is a link to a website that has over 60,000 shelters/rescues/sanctuaries. You look up rescues near you and then read the info the rescue provided. IF they take FIV cats, they should say so in their description of their shelter

      There are differing views on whether to even test feral cats for FIV when they are in for neutering. If you send me your email address, I'll send you a couple of articles that talk about it in depth. You can then make an informed decision.

      Please let me know what you end up doing.

      Best of luck, Frankie

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      @Franksterk: I would love to have the articles you mention. Thanks!

    • Franksterk profile image
      Author

      Frankie Kangas 4 years ago from California

      @anonymous: Please send me your email address so I can send the articles to you. You can go to squidoo.com/lensmasters/frankster and you'll get my Lensmaster page. Under my photo at the left, is a "contact" button that you can use and not have to have your email address in this public spot. I'll get them to you as soon as I get your email address. Frankie

    • profile image

      marsha32 4 years ago

      I don't see a link to a website...and thought I had put one in my charity lens. I am just going to link it to this lens for now.

    • Franksterk profile image
      Author

      Frankie Kangas 4 years ago from California

      @marsha32: This is our website for now. I'll let you know when we create another one.

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      I just adopted a 4 month old bundle of love and she tested positive for FIV. I just found this out tonight, and I have only had her for two days. My other cat has totally taken to her, so I don't think there is much risk of transmission. I think I just need some words of encouragement. Her foster mother will take her back, but she's already wormed her way into my heart. Mostly I am wondering how to cope with my own "anticipatory anxiety." How have others managed? Thanks and aloha from the Big Island of Hawaii (where there are far too many neglected cats and dogs.) Phoebe

    • Franksterk profile image
      Author

      Frankie Kangas 4 years ago from California

      @anonymous: Thank you for your email about your new kitten. I am so glad that you had the good sense and love for the kitten to keep this little feline. Too many folks just freak out and don't do the research needed to know that testing positive for FIV antibodies is not a death sentence. Most cats will live long, heathly, happy lives if living indoors in a loving home. Instead they just get rid of the kitten when they test positive for FIV antibodies.

      She is very lucky and I'm sure she will continue to give you even more love and happiness as she ages. Coping with the anxiety starts with research. Two quick things:

      #1, the test only tess for the presence of FIV "antibodies" NOT the disease itself.

      #2, if your kitten is under 8 months of age, it is most likely she has maternal antibodies (from her mother) and will get rid of those by the time she is 6 to 8 months old. You need to have her retested after she is 8 months old. Then, IF she still tests positive for FIV antibodies, then she is FIV+. However, there is a good chance that she will test negative.

      BTW, I have 17 cats in my home and I have the FIV+ cats mixed in with my non-FIV+ cats for 6 years and none of my non-FIV cats have become positive. I test them every so often so I can show folks. These two groups eat out of the same bowls, lick each other, share the same litter boxes, etc. Many are best buddies.

      The best thing you can do to eliminate your concern is to keep reading articles about FIV, join our Facebook page at https://www.facebook.com/FIVCatRescue and read the comments from others who have FIV cats and share.

      Please let me know if she is under 8 months old now. And later when you retest her, let me know the results.

      Bear hugs, Frankie

      As to your question,

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      @Franksterk: Thanks so much Frankie. I will join the Facebook page. I stayed up last night until 2am and read everything I could find. You are right on, and my kitten, (Minerva or Minnie) is only 4 months old. The vet who tested her told me none of what I have learned, he only suggested I give her back to the cat rescue group. I have no fear for my other cat as they bonded right away. My concern is for me, honestly. I tend to be anxious. I need to get over myself:))Cross your fingers for me, Minnie is mine.

      Aloha, Phoebe

    • Franksterk profile image
      Author

      Frankie Kangas 4 years ago from California

      @anonymous: I'm glad you are feeling better. If you need any more support or just someone to listen, you can contact me thorugh facebook or click on my photo above, right and it will take you to my Squidoo Lensmaster page, then under my photo there is a "contact" link that will come to my email address. My best, Frankie

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      I just found out my cat is FIV positive and I am anything short of devastated. This becomes particularly alarming the older a cat becomes (my cat is 7). Your postings were very encouraging though given I have an outdoor girl that tested negative since she generally steers clear of other cats.

      The primary issue for me is that I cannot keep my cat indoors. And I'm sure this is the best option for him. I love him dearly and have had him since he was born.

      It's such a terrible situation because looking at an FIV positive cat there is no actual way of knowing.

    • Franksterk profile image
      Author

      Frankie Kangas 4 years ago from California

      @anonymous: Let me clarify "indoors". You could have an outdoor enclosure that you let her go into for fresh air, etc. or a cat fence around your yard or a section of it that keeps the cat in and the neighboring cats, dogs or possible other predators out. A screened in porch is another option. A small dog kennel that you add a piece of fencing at the top so the cat can't climb out would also work.

      You are so right. You simply can't look at a cat and know if he tests positive for FIV antibodies or not. They are just cats. They look, act, eat, sleep and play like every other cat. They just "may" have a compromised immune system.

      Let me know if there is any way I can ease you mind. My best, Frankie

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      PLEASE HELP!! I am the owner of three rescue cats. They are all in door animals, all spayed/neutered. I have a small two bedroom apt, but they get along very well.

      My adult daughter has been living with me and she had an outdoor cat who ran away and was suspected to de dead. The cat had been chipped, was found and returned to us. She was very, very sick when we first got her back. We had to keep her separated from the other 3 kitties while we waited for all of the test results to come in. As it turned out, she has FIV. I have slowly been trying to introduce her to the other cats. No luck. They hate her and she is a tough little girl. She tries to beat up the other cats. I cannot have her with mine. My daughter has tried to find her a new home with no luck. I am at a loss... any suggestions as to a sanctuary who might be willing to take her on?

      Thank you!!

    • Franksterk profile image
      Author

      Frankie Kangas 4 years ago from California

      @anonymous: Where are you located -- city, state? You can go to our lens "Rescues taking FIV Cats" at https://hubpages.com/animals/rescues-taking-fiv-ca for a list by state and other suggestions.

    • profile image

      LynneMosiman 4 years ago

      Hi There,

      I took a sweet stray cat, who I was hoping to adopt, in to be neutered this morning, and we had him tested for FIV - positive. After reading what you had to say, I decided I would still adopt him (although I have two FIV negative cats). However, after talking to my vet, my biggest concern is that he will mark/spray in the house. The Humane Society (where he is being neutered) thinks he's 3 or 4 years old. My other cats are a male and female (altered when they were young) - both 9 years old. What are your thoughts on this?

      Thank you,

      Lynne

    • Franksterk profile image
      Author

      Frankie Kangas 4 years ago from California

      @LynneMosiman: Some cats do spay but not as many of most folks think. We've had very little problem when we introduce the cats properly. I need a little more info like: Where has the FIV+ cat been staying now it( sounds like you haven't brought him in your home yet). Are your 2 cats indoor only, indoor/outdoor, outdoor only? You are planning to keep the FIV+ cat indoor only, correct?

    • profile image

      LynneMosiman 4 years ago

      @Franksterk: Hi Frankster, thank you for your reply.

      This cat, who I call Yellow Boy, has been living outside, but he frequents our porch a lot, and over time he has grown to trust me. Our neighbor and I just registered a feral cat colony, so now we'll be able to take all of the feral cats we catch in our neighborhood in to get spayed and neutered.

      Anyway, Yellow Boy might have had some shelter, but he is unneutered, and I don't think anyone has been caring for him aside from those who put out food. Tomorrow when I pick him up from the HS, I'll let him recover in our spare room/office (hopefully he won't freak out about being inside). I work from home, so we ought to be able to get some good bonding time. :)

      My other two cats are strictly indoor cats, and Yellow Boy would be inside only as well if it works out. It sounds like that is best for keeping FIV cats good and healthy.

      I'm so sorry to read about your sweet little foster kittens being euthanized. What a sad waste.

      Thank you for this excellent site.

      Lynne

    • Franksterk profile image
      Author

      Frankie Kangas 4 years ago from California

      @LynneMosiman: I'm glad to hear that you are going to keep Yellow Boy. You shouldn't have any problems once he is fixed and you take the time to introduce your cats to him. Thank you for your kind words about the four little foster kittens.

      I'm so glad you are working with ferals and have registered your colony. What state are you in? I also have a site about Ferals and TNR on Squidoo dedicated to one of the ferals my husband and I saved. It's at squidoo.com/saveferalcats

      Thank you too for all you do for our fine furry friends.

    • profile image

      LynneMosiman 4 years ago

      @Franksterk: Frankster, I'm in Omaha, Nebraska. Where are you? I checked out your feral site - very nice. I'm so glad that the Nebraska Humane Society now offers this colony service - $25 for a year (or maybe two) for spaying and neutering all the ferals we bring in. I'm not sure if they do any vaccinating, though. I would think rabies would be a must. Is there anything else you recommend? Lynne

    • Franksterk profile image
      Author

      Frankie Kangas 4 years ago from California

      @LynneMosiman: I'm in Fort Bragg, CA where I have FIV Cat Rescue. Thank you. I love cats and I just can't bear to see feral cats fending for themselves. We don't have as progressive a Humane Society as you have. They do offer spay and neutering of ferals if people bring them in and another organization, Eileen Hawthorne Fund, provides a coupon to cover most of the cost. I'd love to get more info. on how your program works. Could you give me a contact name and/or email address or phone number I could call? You can send it to me at thefranksterk@yahoo.com It is definitely something I'd like to pass on to some folks working with ferals here.

      For information on what types of vaccines should be given, etc. the best place to get that information if from the Ally Cat Allies website. They have all sorts of materials from flyers, brochures, to how to build a feral cat house and feed stations. They are the place for feral cat info.

      Thank you for all you do for our furry feline friends. Bear hugs, Frankie

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      hi Frankie,

      I took a stray cat to get neutered and they told me he is FIV+. Could you tell me what kind of foods I should give him to keep a healthy diet?

      thank you.

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      Hi,

      A friend of mine that lives in Brazil adopts outdoor cats. It is not a common practice in Brazil (due to the cost of the test) to test feral/outdoors cats for FIV. One of her cats, started to get sick, and then she was tested for FIV (she tested possitive); her illness is because has developed the syndrome. She is very sick, and undergoing Interferon therapy. Due to studies from Cornell University and University of Florida were FIV sick cat reacted very well to the usage of AZT, her vet in Brazil will like to try AZT and wrote a prescription. However, AZT in Brazil is sold only for human cases. My friend contacted me to see if I could help to get the served in the US and send it to her.

      I called the pharmacy and, in the US, the medication can be sold for both humans and animals as long as there is a prescription by a US practitioner.... In other words, by a US Veterinary have to write the prescription, but the prescription my friend scan and send (as well as the lab test) are from a license vet from Brazil. Any suggestions? I really would like to try to help my friend's cat (and possibly other of her cats that might get sick in the future). I read of a case of a FIV cat that got treated using multiple approach after starting getting sick (therapy included AZT) that survived for several quality life years after the onset of the syntoms. Is it possible to purchase the medication here in the US with the Brazilian veterinary prescription? Please, advise. Thanks ahead of time.

    • Franksterk profile image
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      Frankie Kangas 4 years ago from California

      @anonymous: I will do some checking and get back to you ASAP.

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      I am looking for my cat Mr. Hudson who was taken by the Santa Cruz SPCA and adopted out somewhere in San Luis Obispo, CA in March of this year. How can I find who adopted him? Laurie Soderman (831) 477-0771 / humanlaurie@yahoo.com

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      Frankie Kangas 4 years ago from California

      @anonymous: We just added a new module called: FAQ: What should I feed my FIV+ cat? It is our diet recommendation for both FIV+ and non-FIV cats.

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      Frankie Kangas 4 years ago from California

      @anonymous: Laurie, Two thought come to mind in how you might find Mr. Hudson: Ask the Santa Cruz SPCA where they sent him and why? And, find out if Mr. Hudson has a chip.

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      I had three FIV+ cats. I am looking for another young cat because I just lost one of my cats to the FIV+. I am seeing a lot of FeLv cats up for adoption but can I bring a cat with Felv into a home with two FIV+ cats? Also, I live in Texas so if you have any idea how to get a FIV+ cat please let me know!

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      Frankie Kangas 4 years ago from California

      @anonymous: Hi Stephanie, I have several young FIV+ cats looking for forever homesl. Please contact me at frankie@FIVCatRescue.org or call me at 707-964-5100 and we can discuss further.

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      Frankie Kangas 4 years ago from California

      @Franksterk: Oh yeah, you should not bring an FeLV cat into the same home as an FIV+ cat. You could keep them in separate rooms, however, FeLV is too easily transmitted that I wouldn't recommend it.

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      Hi I have a stray cat named huckleberry he is orange and about 2 I had him neutered in hopes of finding him a home he tested fiv positive. I have 4 inside cats they occasionally run out and huckleberry has gotten into a figh ts with each of them I am afraid he will transmit the disease to them. It is so cold outide he needs a home . I need some help so huck can lead a good life he is so sweet with me very affectionate but he hates other cats. I live in hamilton square nj any advice will be deeply appreciated

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      Frankie Kangas 4 years ago from California

      @anonymous: Barbara, I'll send you an email. Bear hugs, Frankie

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      HairlessCat 4 years ago

      Hi Frankster,

      Because what you're doing here is heroic and appreciated, I've decided to donate 100% of my lens proceeds to your FIV Cat Rescue.

      You're obviously an ethical and likeable person and cats need more people like you.

      I'm really happy that my lens money will be going to a great cause.

      Bless your heart,

      =^-^= Hairless Cat Girl =^-^=

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      Frankie Kangas 4 years ago from California

      @HairlessCat: Oh my. Thank you so much for the vote of confidence and for the donation to FIV Cat Rescue of 100% of the royalties from your lenses. What a wonderful gift. I thank you from the bottom of my heart. It will be used to continue our fight stop the killing of FIV+ cats. Bear hugs, =^..^= Frankie

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      I just wanted to say - what a great website! I'm so impressed by you and your work - you surely are a fantastic person Mrs. Frankster. I have had 4 adopted cats, when the 5 one came along and he's been tested for FIV (+). I have him for the last year and he's put on weight, his fur is shiny and healthy now, I've made the decision to remove most of his teeth (unfortunately) but in general he's doing very well. I add some supplements to his diet as well as lactoferrin.

      Mrs. Frankskter - you're simply AMAZING.

      Best wishes from Berlin,

      Magda

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      Frankie Kangas 4 years ago from California

      @anonymous: Thank you for your kind words. I amso glad you're kitty is doing well now and that he has a loving home. Thank you for all you do for our furry feline friends. Bear hugs, Frankie

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      Thank you so much for posting this!! We found the SWEETEST cat in our barn a few months ago and took him to the vet today since we have 6 other cats and wanted to make sure they were also protected. When he tested positive for FIV, it was pretty saddening, because we were told he had to go to a single-family, indoor home or be put down. I've spent most of the morning reaching out on FB and looking for rescues, and there just aren't any. He's not neutered so we are going to have to fix that, but he's so non-aggressive I don't think he is a danger to any of our cats. He apparently DOES fight with our neighbor's cat, and we have talked to her to let her know. Hopefully if we get him neutered the fighting will stop.

      This gave me more confidence to keep him for a bit longer while we find a home (vet said 3 or 4 days, but I will not give up on him in such a short amount of time). I would LOVE to keep him forever as our barn cat, but I know it is not recommended he be an outdoors car. We have food out there for our other cat, who refuses to come inside, and he's got a great weight on him and everything.

      I am glad this is here. And saddened that so many cats are put down for this. For now, we will monitor him, and hopefully find a good home or rescue. I don't want to make him sick because he is outside :(

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      I'm so sorry you lost the four kittens. God bless you for helping the rest of us. We found alost beautiful male who was not neutered. We had him neutered and found out he has FIV. Do you know of any group in Northern New Jersey who could help me find a good home? I have so many cats since I foster or I would keep him. Please reply: msrebisz@yahoo. com Thank you.

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      Frankie Kangas 4 years ago from California

      @anonymous: Did you look on my other lens: Rescues Taking FIV Cats? It lists in alphabetical order, by state, the rescues we know about so far that take FIV cats. There are 4 places listed for NJ but I haven't a clue if they are in Northern NJ. I'll send an email with them in case you don't see this post. The lens is at www.squidoo.com/Rescues-Taking-FIV-Cats. Bear hugs, Frankie

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      Frankie Kangas 4 years ago from California

      @anonymous: Please do not give into your vet. There is no reason to kill a perfectly healthy cat. It will affect you more than you know if you do. Instead, love him and keep him as a barn cat for now. That is always the 2nd best alternative when you can't keep him indoors. Erect a nice warm cozy spot for him out in the barn. Make sure he has food, water and some attention. That will keep him safe during the winter months.

      In the meantime, you can try to find the cat a home. Where are you located? Did you look at my website, Rescues Taking FIV Cats (www.squidoo.com/Rescues-Taking-FIV-Cats) It lists in alphabetical order by state the rescues we've found so far that take FIV cats. We add a few weekly, so keep looking there.

      Also, send me an email at fivcat@gmail.com and I'll send you an aplication for us to post him to our facebook page. It's just some needed questions and I can give you some more advice. Thank you for saving this cat. I'm sure, he will pay you back in purrs, kitty kisses and head butts. And, if you're very lucky, he'll let you rub his belly. Bear hugs, Frankie

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      LynneMosiman 4 years ago

      Hi Frankster, you and I exchanged some emails awhile back when I rescued Yellow Boy - a stray Tom who had been living around our porch for the last few years. When I had him neutered they discovered he was FIV positive.

      When I brought him in, I kept him separated from our other two 9 year old cats for a week and a half or 2, and then I let him mingle with them. He was very fearful of everything and everyone at first, and he mostly hid in the basement and came up to eat and get a few occasional lovies.

      It's now been a few months, and he has become more and more comfortable. Our other cats have just been so crabby about his presence, and they've persisted in hissing at him most of the time if he gets too close. At first he would stay away from them, then he would just look at them and then look at me like, "what is wrong with them?", but now lately he seems to be getting a little aggressive. There have been 3 or 4 times over the weekend when he has chased one of them or cornered them. I hear the hissing, and I go to investigate and find that they are both in the "fight" pose - ears back, bodies hunched, etc.

      Yellow Boy is 4 or 5, big and muscular and he has his claws. Our cats are 9, soft and clawless (we didn't do it - they came that way). Our male is as big as YB, but not nearly as muscular. At first I thought he and our male were vying for dominance, but then he chased our super-fearful little lady.

      Oy! I'm so disappointed that things are going this way. I can't let my other two cats get hurt, and I really think it's a matter of time.

      I have looked around the web for some ideas on how to handle this particular situation, but the only thing I found was from a behaviorist who suggested finding a new home for the new cat. If I found a devoted home for him, I guess I would feel okay about that, but I can't stand the idea of someone not giving him the affection and patience that he has really been thriving on.

      I should add that he is an AWESOME cat. Vocal, affectionate, playful, funny, perfect potty manners. He could not be more wonderful.

      Anyway,...any thoughts? :-) Thanks for letting me vent.

      Lynne

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      I have a stray cat that i have rescued and ive had him for about a year now. He is FIV+ but I just recently rescued a stray kitten that i haven't gotten checked for FIV but if she turns out negative would it be healthy and safe for her to interact with my other cat who is FIV+ without getting it? So far she hasn't interacted with my other cat because my vet said he may give it to her through saliva, is that true?

    • Franksterk profile image
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      Frankie Kangas 4 years ago from California

      @anonymous: Hi, Thank you for taking in the FIV+ cat a year ago. No You vet is absolutely wrong, FIV is NOT passed through saliva. Non-FIV cats andFIV+ cats can live together as long as they are all non-agressive. If you send me an email at fivcat@gmail.com I will send you an FIV Facts flyer and a FIV Myths Debunked flyer as well.

    • Franksterk profile image
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      Frankie Kangas 4 years ago from California

      @LynneMosiman: Hi Lynne, I do remember you and Yellow Boy. Nice to hear from you again. Sorry you are experiencing these problems. There are several things I think you should try before you decide to re-home Yellow Boy. I'd hate for either of you lose that wonderful connection you've obviously built between you.

      This may be quite long and I may have attachment to send, so I'd like to respond via email. Send me an email at fivcat@gmail.com and I'll send you a response . Hand in there. Bear hugs, Frankie

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      Hello,

      I recently trapped a female kitty who I thought was pregnant. Although she is feral I was able to get her into a carrier and take her to my vet. He said she must have had kittens recently. I did see two kittens in the summer near my back yard which is by a wooded area but have not seen them since the summer. We have foxes and coyotes here.

      I am searching for a permanent home for her. She is feral but I am working with her. She is FIV positive. She has had her shots and she was spade today. I am doing this on my own but again I am unable to keep her and will not put her back outside because of the dangerous environment.

      I have six cats and a dog. I recently took in my brother's dog because he was diagnosed with cancer and had surgery and was no longer able to care for her. I, myself have been going through a lot. I lost my son in the Army and am trying to recover from this.

      I cannot turn a blind eye to the needs of this little kitty. However, this has made the situation very stressful for me. I have tried several shelters but was told they are full. Some won't take feral cats. Right now she is afraid and confused and with time I know she will be a good companion to someone. She's black and white and is two years old and weighs 9 lbs. I have had her for about three weeks and have her isolated in one of the bathrooms which is a good size but it's not fair to keep her in there forever.

      Can you help me?

    • Franksterk profile image
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      Frankie Kangas 4 years ago from California

      @anonymous: Hi Katherine, First, thank your for taking this young feral cat in. I need more information, for instance, (1) where you are located, (2) what shelters you have already tried (3) did you contact the shelters we listed by your state on https://hubpages.com/animals/rescues-taking-fiv-ca ? Please contact me at fivcat@gmail.com so we can have a back-and-forth conversation quicker and easier than going through this message board. Bear hugs, Frankie

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      @Franksterk: Mr. Hudson DOES have a chip and I was under the impression that the SPCA would not divulge any information about who or where he was sent. I'll call them first thing in the morning! THANK YOU THANK YOU for hearing me and taking the time to help! THANK YOU for your sincere care and dedication. God Bless you, Laurie

    • Franksterk profile image
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      Frankie Kangas 4 years ago from California

      @anonymous: I'm not sure that they will give out that information since I'm unsure why they send him someplace else instead of returning him to you. Good luck.

    • suepogson profile image

      suepogson 4 years ago

      Well done for all your work for cats. This made emotional reading. It's so good that you are spreading the word on a subject that it, I believe, little known. Thank you

    • Franksterk profile image
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      Frankie Kangas 4 years ago from California

      @suepogson: Thank you for the kudos. Yes, a lot of people do not know what FIV is and many that do have old, outdated information or know only the myths that are out there. We aim to change that! Bear hugs, Frankie

    • Loretta L profile image

      Loretta Livingstone 4 years ago from Chilterns, UK.

      I am devastated to read that cats are destroyed, which could otherwise live happy, healthy lives. I hope lots of people read this.

    • Franksterk profile image
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      Frankie Kangas 4 years ago from California

      @Loretta L: Thank you for really getting what we are trying to do: save the lives of cats "which could otherwise live happy, healthy lives." We are working so hard to get the message out -- to educate the folks who don't know and to change the minds of those who destroy these perfectly wonderful cats because of testing positive for FIV ANTIBODIES, not even the actual disease. Bear hugs,Frankie

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      I wanted to thank you for your great website. The story that you tell could have been our story. We were fostering 4 wonderful kittens only to learn they were FIV positive. While the shelter said they were not going to put them down they were not in a hurry to neuter them until they assured they would be able to find homes. Anyway, thanks to your website I contacted two shelters in Florida that assured me these kittens were more than likely not FIV positive and said I should retest them at 6 months of age. I arranged a long term foster home for them and the shelter signed them over to us. They were retested last week and as predicted they are no long FIV positive. As three of them are polydactyl and all 4 are sweet and loving we now pretty much have a waiting list and will be conducting âinterviewsâ as we search for a forever homes for these wonderful guys.

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      Frankie Kangas 4 years ago from California

      @anonymous: Thank you for sharing your story. It does sound a lot like mine but with a great outcome. I'm so glad you were able to stop the shelter from killing them and that they no longer have the stigma of "FIV+" so they will be easier to place. I just know you will find wonderful homes for your 4 kitties. Bear hugs, Frankie

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      does anyone know where i can find some place for FIV cat, he was a stray and he just tested positive today while i was trying to get him a home. i can't keep him bc i have a healthy cat. Please help me the owners of the house are calling the pound to put him down and its killing me i love him

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      Frankie Kangas 4 years ago from California

      @anonymous: Please do not put the cat down. If he is healthy now, he could outlive your "healthy" cat. The test does NOT test for the virus, it tests for FIV ANTIBODIES only. Most FIV+ cats, if taken care of, will live a long, healthy, happy life. By taking care I simply mean (1) live indoors only, (2) have yearly or twice a year checkups (3) feed them good food -- NO raw foods, (4) love them and treat them good and (5) IF they get a cold or something that they are treated aggressively.

      I had have FiV+ cats and non-FIV cats living together going on 7 years -- eating and drinking out of the same dishes, licking each other, play fighting and chasing each other and using the same litter boxes. None of the non-FIV cats have "caught" FIV -- FIV is passed through deep bites.

      So, please the latest research shows that FIV+ cats can live together with other non-fiv cats as long as all of the cats are non-aggressive.

      Please read the info on this page. If you still want to get rid of this cat, please give us a chance to try to get the cat a forever home or foster until we can.

      With respect, Frankie

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      We just rescued the neighborhood stray Tom Cat- well, he had owners, just not very good ones as he was un-neutered, very dirty, and yes, FIV positive. After the first test, we had the Western blot test done and that was also positive. He is the sweetest cat and loves to cuddle and eat. We paid for him to get an "Extreme Kitty Makeover" at our vet (neutering, bath, teeth cleaning- only a little tarter on two teeth- claws trimmed, ears cleaned, an absess on his big head lanced). They told us that he is approximately 3 years old and shows absolutely no signs of Feline Aids. We love him and want to adopt him, but we do have five other inside cats. Of the five, four of them are male and they all get along great- they do get rough and tumble around sometimes but there has never been any blood. I know all the facts but here is my dilmemma. I don't want to compromise the health of the other five just to save this one. All of our cats are rescues and I feel responsible to keep them safe. We were thinking of bringing the tomcat home (named Thomas, appropriately) to see if there was a chance for a fight. As big and impressive as Thomas is, I can't imagine him starting a fight. Our vet said he would hold onto him until he found him a home so its not like he will be put to sleep. I just want Thomas to have the best life possible and I know we could give him that. What is your opinion? Dixie PS: In the back bedroom, we have Thomas' girlfriend Gypsy, who we believe was feral... we trapped her when we realized she was pregant. She tested negative on January 18th (I think she conceived around December 3rd) and she gave birth to the healthiest, roundest babies on February 13th. Since we have five cats already, if we adopt Thomas, we MIGHT be able to adopt one kitten, or maybe Gypsy... but I think 6 or 7 is our limit living in the suburbs in a deed-restricted neighborhood. :)

    • Franksterk profile image
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      Frankie Kangas 4 years ago from California

      @anonymous: Dixie, Thank you so much for saving Thomas, Gypsy and the kittens. In order for me to best assist you in trying to place the kittens you can't keep, please go to our webpage whee we have an easy to fill out form which automates our process and lets us help you faster: This is all you need to do:

      1. Go to our main website: http://FIVCatRescue.org

      2. Click menu item "Help My Cat" (top-right tab)

      3. That page explains what we can do and what you need to do

      4. Fill in the form at the bottom

      5. Press "Submit" when finished

      6. Send 1 or 2 good jpg photos of the cat to catsinneed@fivcatrescue.org

      You will get a confirmation email. Please respond ASAP to give us permission to assist you.

      Once the photo(s) are received, we will be in a position to try to help you rehome your cat and a volunteer will be assigned to assist you.

      Thank you for taking care of this FIV+ cat and working to find a forever home or rescue. Good people like you give us hope that one day soon, all FIV+ cats will be welcome into loving, forever homes, regardless of testing positive for an antibody.

      Best regards,

      =^..^= Frankie

      ~

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      @Franksterk: Thank you so much Frankie! Our vet will help us adopt out the kittens- he does want to test them in two weeks when they are six weeks old. If they test negative, then we'll probably take them up there when they are between 10-12 weeks old. If they are positive, then we'll be holding onto them until they can be retested... but we'll cross that bridge when we come to it. I honestly don't think Gypsy or the kittens are infected- Thomas is sooooooo mild-mannered and our vet told us that Thomas would have had to bite Gypsy for her to be infected... that mating would most likely not cause it. I will keep the information above... right now, Thomas is in a cage at our vet's clinic. We go visit him every couple of days and we've supplied the clinic with the food he likes... I feel sorry for him being in a cage when he used to be King of the Neighborhood BUT at least he is safe... his head is so big that it isn't fitting in the silver bowls they supplied so today we will be taking him some dog size bowls... and making sure someone comes in on Sundays. We are thinking of bringing him home next week for a test run- I don't think he would start anything with our cats, but we do have one female that acts crazy... do you have any suggestions? Maybe set up a cage for Thomas in the middle of our living room to see how he/they react? Or would that be too undignified for him? Thank you for the information- its great to know that if it doesn't work out at our house, we WILL have a good home. Much Love, Dixie

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      Frankie Kangas 4 years ago from California

      @anonymous: I'm so glad that you are working with a vet that seems to be informed about FIV. We hear of too many that just kill the kittens and cats and never even blink or check to see if they have the latest information.

      I'm also excited that you are going to try to bring Thomas into your household. Introducing an FIV cat into the other cats in a home is really no different than what you would do if all cats were non-FIV except that I would take the process slower and be more diligent in watching the reactions between the cats and keep them separate in the various stages longer.

      If you send your email address to me at fivcat@gmail.com, I'll send you more detailed instructions on how to introduce Thomas to your cat family.

      Bear hugs, Frankie

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      @Franksterk: I sent an e-mail to that address yesterday with pictures of Thomas and some more information, but I am going to e-mail you again because I would LOVE more information on how to introduce our five to Thomas. Gypsy and the kittens are currently in our spare bedroom- the only thing in there is liter box, a big whelping bed I made out of a Rubbermaid container and a variety of sheets, blankets, and towels (Gypsy arranged everything exactly like she wanted it!), a TV/DVD player (we put in a dvd made for cats that has lizards, birds, squirrels, etc), a window and a stool under the window so Gypsy can look outside. We have a screened porch- that's where we kept Thomas last weekend when we were waiting for the vet to open on Monday. This is Florida, so he could be on the porch for another month probably... OR I could move Gypsy and the kittens into my office with a baby gate (there's no door- just an arched doorway)- the baby gate would keep the kittens and their needle claws in here with me- Gypsy could come and go as she wants (she did fight with our other cats while she was pregnant but maybe she was just hormonal- Gypsy is Momma Grizzley for sure!) And then Thomas could have the spare room... that's where all of our rescues start out. We spend time in there with them- we have even slept on the floor with newbies (even when they were hidden under the stool)- then slowly start leaving the door open. Within 10 days, new cats are usually curled up with our other cats. But YES... would love info on introducing Thomas to the family, keeping in mind that they've communicated with him since October- THEY would be on the screened porch and he was in the yard... then last weekend, he was on the porch and they were inside. My only fear is that Thomas IS big and powerful enough to hurt them if he wanted to... the vet said the absess he lanced was on Thomas's head because he wasn't backing down from a fight. Otherwise, it would have been on his butt. :)

      Initially our vet recommended that we not adopt him but putting him down was never an option. I just think Thomas is one of those cats I would always wonder about if I let him go.

    • Franksterk profile image
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      Frankie Kangas 4 years ago from California

      @anonymous: Hi Dixie,

      I got your email with your wonderful photos. I'm putting together an answer to you and you'll have it today. I love hearing about what you've done to make Gypsy comfortable giving birth and taking care of the kittens. I love cats and love to hear of others who feel like I do. You guys rock! Look for an email from met later today. Frankie

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      We were so sorry to hear what happened to your four precious kittens. You are honoring their memory with your efforts to educate others about FIV.

      We have three bottle babies, rescued from a feral mom around 2-3 weeks of age. They tested positive for FIV at 8 weeks, but are otherwise 100% healthy. Do I need to wait until 6 months to test again?

    • Franksterk profile image
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      Frankie Kangas 4 years ago from California

      @anonymous: âMany small people, in many small places, do many small things, that can alter the face of the world.â Anonymous

      Thank you Ann for taking in these kitties.

      It is recommended for shelters that after using the Elisa (SNAP) test, which is what shelters and vets use 1st because it is the cheapest, you test again 60 days later. This test only tests for antibodies, NOT the disease itself. At this time, the kitten(s) may have already passed their Mom's antibodies and the shelter adopts them out. They could adopt them out anyway, but many prefer to know so they can tell the adopter, unless the adopter doesn't care (like I wouldn't care).

      If after the second test, they are still testing positive for the antibodies, you test again in another 60 days. They should be over 6 months old by then. (I have always erred in favor of the cat and waited at least until they were 7 months old. )

      If the 3rd test stills shows antibodies I recommend have a PCR test done AFTER they are 6 months old. The PCR tests for the virus itself. The PCR tests costs about $200 where the PCR costs about $65 (prices vary by location and vet). IF BOTH tests are positive, then the cat is FIV+ but that just means they have a compromised immune system. Most FIV+ cats live long, healthy, happy lives with the proper care almost exactly the same care you give other cats (indoor only, good food (no raw food), vet checkup, lots of love and if they get sick get them treated immediately). Not really a big deal.

      Hope this helps. BTW, we are working on a new website and a new book which will have a lot more information for cat owners, rescuers, shelters and vets.

      Thanks again for all you do for our furry, feline friends. Frankie

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      Thank you for this website and valuable information.

      A few months ago my 13 year old Sniffer became very ill. The vet did the typical blood panel. I was horrified to find out that she was FIV positive. I saw how sick she was and thought it was a death sentence, for sure. I was also very worried about the kitten we brought home from the shelter a few months back.

      The vet gave her a shot of antibiotics and something for her nausea and recommended that I keep her away from the kitten. In other words, keep one of the cats locked in a room.

      I got our other cat tested (he is negative) and did some research. That is when I came across your site. I got some good food and some feline whole-body supplements. I learned that both kitties can live together and not infect one another.

      Although we know Sniffer has some other stuff going on with her liver, she is hanging in there. She and Steve (cat from the shelter) live together just fine. Everyone is alive and no one is locked in a room.

      Thank you again!

      Heather

      San Diego, CA

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      Author

      Frankie Kangas 4 years ago from California

      @anonymous: You are welcome. Thank you for coming to the site. I'm so glad the Sniffer is doing better and has such a good Mom who cared enough to research FIV and not just assume the worse. Liver issues happens even with non-FIV cats and could possibly have nothing to do with it. However, I'm glad you are taking care of her. Do you have any idea when she may have gotten FIV? How old was she when you got her? Was she an indoor-outdoor cat? Love to have your full story and a photo for our new website. You can contact me directly at fivcat@gmail.com. Bear hugs, Frankie

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      anonymous 3 years ago

      I captured and took a stray black cat to have him neutered and given vaccinations, only to find that he has FIV, he has been hanging out with another white male that also was neutered and vaccinated but not tested for FIV. The animal control folks say he ( the black one) needs to be put down because we all are unable to find a single cat home nor an FIV cat home for him/them. He is a little skittish from being on the streets but is NOT feral, he seems to enjoy being petted etc. but his teeth are very bad so we believe he may be in pain. I just need to try to find help for him instead of just euthanasia as an answer without at least trying, do you know of anyone or anywhere he would be able to home with?

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      Frankie Kangas 3 years ago from California

      @anonymous: Where -- city/state -- are you located? You can get a list by city/state of rescues taking FIV+ cats at www.squidoo.com/rescues-taking-fiv-cats There is also other information there of things to do to help find homes for FIV+ cats. Thank you so caring about this cat and helping to find him a home. FIV is NOT a reason for killing a cat. He can live a long life with a good home. Bear hugs, Frankie

    • profile image

      anonymous 3 years ago

      Thank you for all you are doing!

      I adopted a sickly red point Siamese kitten from the pound who was FIV+ and showing symptoms of acute infection (swollen, abscessed lymph node, anemia, underweight, etc.) which he must have been born with. I named him Moose- he weighed all of 1 lb at the time- to give him something to aspire to. Although the vet didn't think he would make it, with good care and love we were able to nurse him back to full health! Three years later, he is an amazingly active cat with no sign of illness.

      We did vaccinate our resident cats before fully introducing Moose, but looking back I don't believe it was necessary or wise to do so. If I have learned anything, it is that an FIV+ cat is just like any other cat, and fear of the virus is overblown.

    • Franksterk profile image
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      Frankie Kangas 3 years ago from California

      @anonymous: Thank you for your story, Tony. I'd love to use it in our new book about FIV scheduled to publish on July15. Would you please contact me at fivcat@gmail.com I need your city/state and a photo or 2. Thank you for loving Moose so much and taking such good care of him. Bear hugs, Frankie

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      Frankie Kangas 3 years ago from California

      @anonymous: Hi Heather, I'd love to have Sniffer's story for our new book coming out end of July. You can contact me at fivcat@gmail.com Thanks! Frankie

    • profile image

      anonymous 3 years ago

      Hi- I was wondering your thoughts about having an FIV+ cat living in a house with another cat and two small dogs. My question is not about spreading the FIV, but about keeping the FIV+ cat safe and healthy. The FIV+ cat would absolutely stay indoors. The dogs of course go outside and the other cat goes outside a bit (into the yard with the dogs) but does not interact with other cats. Do you think these other animals might bring disease/pathogens into the house that could harm the FIV+ cat? Thank you so much for any input!

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      Frankie Kangas 3 years ago from California

      @anonymous: It is always possible that the cat could bring something in since you really can't control whether a stray or feral cat comes in and has URI or something that your cat gets. I would not be too overly worried about it though. FIV really is no big deal. Your cat's immune system may be compromised at some point. FIV is a lentivirus and is very slow kicking in. Most FIV cats live long, healthy lives and die of old age diseases just like Non-FIV cats.

      As with all of your animals, IF they start hiding, acting different, not eating or drinking, not using the box or going outside the box, sneezes, or snuffles, then immediately take them to the vet. It's really that simple. There are a lot of Myths and misinformation out on FIV. We have a book about FIV coming out with the latest research, etc. at the end of July. If you want more info on it, contact me at fivcat@gmail.com I'll also put the information about the book on this site when it is available.

      Bear hugs, Frankie

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      anonymous 3 years ago

      Hi. I am in the Los Angeles area and a cat rescuer/ kitten foster parent etc. I rescued a feral 5 month old kitten from my neighborhood who happens to be FIV+. I would love to rescue another kitten for him to have as a companion as he is a great foster brother. Any info on how I can find FIV+ babies who need adopting in my area? I am in the East Hollywood/ Silverlake District of LA.

      Thanks for all you do!

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      Frankie Kangas 3 years ago from California

      @anonymous: First thank you for all you do for the felines of the world. At 5 months old, the kitten needs to be retested after 6-8 months old because s/he may have just inherited the Mom's antibodies and they will go away. So, he may not really be FIV+.

      To find other FIV+ cats and kittens, you can find rescues that take FIV+ cats in CA on my lens, squidoo.com/rescues-taking-fiv-cats It is in alphabetical order by city state. You can also contact your local shelters to let them know you are looking. You could also post on our Factbook page your request: facebook.com/fivcatrescue.catinneed

      Bear hugs, Frankie

    • profile image

      anonymous 3 years ago

      I just rescued a cat that happens to be FIV+ and while I hear that it's possible for FIV- and FIV+ cats to live together.... I just don't want to chance it with my other cats. I'm in NYC and I am keeping him quarantined has he heals up from several infections and some nasty scratches from a fight but I want to find him a home. Can anyone recommend any resources in my area?

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      anonymous 3 years ago

      We are thinking about adopting an adult FIV+ cat. My husband is being treated for a herpes eye infection. Do the cat or my husband have any concerns? Lysine lists herpes so I'm concerned.

    • Franksterk profile image
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      Frankie Kangas 3 years ago from California

      @anonymous: Check out my other Squidoo lens which lists rescues taking FIV+ cats by city/state at squidoo.com/rescues-taking-fiv-cats The site also has other resources listed.

    • Franksterk profile image
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      Frankie Kangas 3 years ago from California

      @anonymous: I have herpes simplex -- always have had -- and haven't had any problems and I have shared my home with between 13 and 17 FIV+ cats and 4 Non-FIV cats for over 7 years. I take Lysine and Vitamin C myself (when I remember) and all my cats get it just to help ward off colds (URI in cats). I actually have fewer symptoms than when I was younger. ~shrug~ Don't know why.

      However, you should ask your husband's doctor because while it is seldom an issue, FIV+ cats MAY be more likely to carry a few infections that can be transmitted to people. Such infections are detectable and treatable in cats. A person with a compromised immune system should consider this.

    • profile image

      anonymous 3 years ago

      I need 2 no ware there is a rescue 4 feline aids kitties in Maryland,i found 2 12 wk old very sweet kitties that need a good home..

    • Franksterk profile image
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      Frankie Kangas 3 years ago from California

      @anonymous: I have another website -- squidoo.com/rescues-taking-fiv-cats that lists in order by city/state rescues that may be able to help you.

      A couple of things to know:

      1. FIV is NOT Kitty AIDS (most cats NEVER even get to the AIDS stage.

      2. MOST kittens that test positive for FIV antibodies do NOT have FIV. They have simply inherited their mom's antibodies. They need to be retested after they are 6 to 8 months old -- at that time, they will most likely test negative for FIV

      3. FIV is really NO BIG Deal, it simply means a cat's immune system MAY be compromised.

      4. FIV is a lentivirus, which is very slow acting and usually won't affect a cat for 7 to 10 years.

      4. Most cats that test positive for FIV, live long, healthy lives given the same good care you give to ANY cat.

      The other site also has other ways to find homes for FIV+ cats. You can also post a message with a photo to our Facebook page -- facebook.com/fivcatrescue.catsinneed

      Warm regards, Frankie

    • profile image

      anonymous 3 years ago

      American Association of Feline Practitioners website " Vaccination is not currently recommended for all cats, and the decision to vaccinate should be made on a case-by case basis after consulting with your veterinarian. Because the routine test for FIV (ELISA blood test) detects antibodies against the virus and not the virus itself, vaccination will cause a cat to test positive. A second, confirmatory test (PCR test) may help differentiate a vaccinated from truly infected cat, but results from this test are sometimes hard to interpret. Therefore, any cat which is vaccinated against FIV should be permanently identified, such as with a microchip, tattoo or collar. As well, cats infected with FIV may take up to 60 days to test positive. Testing should be repeated at least 60 days later to ensure a cat is truly not infected." I had previously read that the tests would only register a vaccine within 1-2 years of being vaccinated, but do not see it appearing now, so more research must have been completed since then.

      The largest issue we have seen with both of our FIV positive cats is oral disease and tooth decay. Every effort to maintain their teeth is a MUST, because infection will weaken their immune systems leading to other related infections which can be fatal. Our first was diagnosed when struck with "Traveling Leg Syndrome" a sad neurological condition where their legs intermittently stop "working" for periods of time. Thankfully he fully recovered after about 3 weeks, and there has been no sign of it since. We do not use "live" vaccines ( even modified) of any kind on these two, as our feline specialist said it is a risk to their immune system as well. Opting instead for killed, giving the 4 way, and the separate FeLV shot a week apart. we have not found a combo shot containing all killed virus yet, besides, it's still a lot at once. It's a great page, I hope to come back and read more soon, I'm sure you have a section concerning oral care that I missed.

    • Franksterk profile image
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      Frankie Kangas 3 years ago from California

      @anonymous: Thank you for your input. We are currently creating a new website and will have a book on FIV out shortly. Both will include the latest information and research on FIV. FIV+ cats get a bad rap and we hope to help debunk the myths about the virus. Most live long, healthy lives when given the same general care we give all our cats.

      We will be discussing dental in our book and on the new site (this one will be updated as well). Briefly, dental problems exist in all cats. Most cats after the age of 3 have dental problems from tartar and gingivitis to stomatitis. Dental issues/infections are very bad for all cats as with humans as the bacteria flows through the blood stream and affects the rest of the body -- organs and all -- causing systemic health problems such as kidney or heart disease. ALL cats need to have dental care whether they are FIV+ or not. It is a very serious problem that many owners aren't aware of.

      Thank you for all you do for all cats, FIV+ and Non-FIV.

    • profile image

      sue-steele-904 3 years ago

      Hello, We took in a stray cat that appeared in our garden,he has now been neutered and has most of his teeth removed because of severe gingivitis caused by FIV.Is there anything that we can give him to help heal his still sore gums?and what supplements should we give him to help him generally?He is about 2 years old so we want to do all we can for our beautiful boy.Kind regards,Sue.

    • Franksterk profile image
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      Frankie Kangas 3 years ago from California

      @sue-steele-904: Hi Sue, thank you for taking in this stay cat, neutering and caring for his mouth problems. Any time an FIV+ cat has any sort of a problem, it is said to be because they "are FIV+". That is not always the case. Dental problems are one of those areas. Bad teeth can be hereditary and also strays and feral cats that don't get the proper nutrition will have poor health and have mouth problems.

      According to the American Veterinary Dental Society (AVDS), more than 70% of cats show signs of oral disease by they time they're 3 years old. That's 7 out of 10 cats! We have had both FIV+ and NON-FIV+ cats for over 30+ years and have had gingivitis in both groups of cats. Some as young as 1 year old who were NON-FIV+ had gingivitis and some FIV+ cats who had no issues for years.

      Dental Probiotics for Cats would help his mouth heal. You should ask your vet which they consider the best dental probiotics for cats. There are certain ingredients that need to be in a probiotic and s/he should know which is best.

      Although a cat that has no teeth can eat dry food -- I've seen many -- many vets, including mine, recommend a wet food diet for ALL cats -- FIV+ and NON-FIV+ -- because most dry/hard food is simply not nutritious. Most don't have enough real meat (the first couple of ingredients should be real meat, not byproducts). Also many cats (and dogs) are allergic to corn and other items that are in dry food.

      I feed mainly wet food to all of our cats and only give them dry food as a treat. We consider it potato chips or candy. And the cats act like it is too. In the past we've had many become overweight due to the dry food. The cats don't get as much water as is needed with dry food either. With wet food, they are getting most of the water they need.

      I do add Lysine and pumpkin into the wet food at least once a day. You can get the information on why and how much, etc above under the heading, "What should I feed my FIV+ cat?"

      I hope this helps! Bear hugs, Frankie

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      sue-steele-904 3 years ago

      @Franksterk: Thank for your valued advice on FIV+ cats Frankie,I would like to ask you if you know the safest flea treatments for these cats as i don't know if vet flea treatment is too toxic for their weak immune systems?Many thanks,Sue

    • Franksterk profile image
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      Frankie Kangas 3 years ago from California

      @sue-steele-904: I treat all of of my cats -- FIV+ or NON-FIV -- exactly the same. Same food. Same water. Same care. Same amount of love and attention. Same treatment for all illnesses. Same treatment for fleas. I use Advantage. Never had a problem on any of my cats. I don't like to use any kind of flea treatment unless it is necessary. My cats rarely ever get fleas because they are all indoor only and we have no dogs. I usually only have to treat them 1 or 2 times a year but I do check regularly to make sure that is enough. This year in Fort Bragg, CA, it has been a very bad flea year. Everyone is complaining in town. So people must be tracing them into the house. I've had to treat them the last 3 months in a row. The weather was extra hot this year and in months that we usually get more rain and less sun, which may be the reason for the fleas.

    • profile image

      sue-steele-904 3 years ago

      @Franksterk: Thanks Frankie x

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      sethandressen 3 years ago

      Cats are pure fun and lovely.

    • Franksterk profile image
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      Frankie Kangas 3 years ago from California

      @sethandressen: Yes, they are!

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      Valerie 2 years ago

      Hello there,

      My name is Valerie and I work at a veterinary hospital in Murrieta, CA. I found a cat in my neighborhood who I was going to give to my local rescue, who has a spot in PetSmart, to adopt out. Upon neutering him, he tested positive for FIV. She cannot take him to PetSmart now, so he just staying at my hospital. I'm having a very hard time trying to find a home for him in my area. He is EXTREMELY sweet and playful. Other than testing positive for FIV, I believe he would be easily adoptable, as he has such a friendly personality. We are thinking he is around 2-4 years old.

      Do you have any room for him? If you do not, do you have any guidance on where he could go?

      Thank you so much for your time

    • profile image

      Tony Grieco 2 years ago

      Any info on Lymphocyte T-Cell Immunomodulator (LTCI), which has been approved to treat FIV and FeLV?

      There does not seem to be much information available about it, except from the people who are selling it- any insights from you or your experts would be appreciated!

    • Franksterk profile image
      Author

      Frankie Kangas 2 years ago from California

      Valerie,

      See my site --https://hubpages.com/animals/rescues-taking-fiv-ca... -- that lists the Rescues that we know of that take FIV cats by state.

      If you cannot find one on the list in your area that will take him, also listed (the module after the Introduction module) is a link to a website that has over 60,000 shelters/rescues/sanctuaries. You look up rescues near you and then read the info the rescue provided. IF they take FIV cats, they should say so in their description of their shelter.

      Best of luck, Frankie

    ADOPTED 2013: James "Jimmy" Bond

    ADOPTED 2013:  James "Jimmy" Bond
    ADOPTED 2013: James "Jimmy" Bond

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    Solvit HoundAbout Pet Stroller, Large, Sapphire Blue
    Solvit HoundAbout Pet Stroller, Large, Sapphire Blue

    Another way we introduce people to our cats up for adoption is to have a strolling even around town. They keep our cats contained and entertained. We also get lots of exercise ourselves. We need at least 2 of these as we borrow from other organizations when we can.

     

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      • profile image

        anonymous 7 years ago

        What a wonderful cause for these sweet kitties. You have a big heart of gold.

        Blessed by a Squid Angel and very happy to do so. Bless your hearts!!!

        Susie

      • profile image

        Janet1 7 years ago

        Frankie-bless you for all you do for cats and other animals. Being your friend and watching you take care of all the cats and other critters is an inspiring.

      • profile image

        julieannbrady 7 years ago

        My dear Frankster! Thank you for all your love for the animals and for all your wonderful caring contributions to the brotherhood and sisterhood of Squidoo, et. al.

      • Heather426 profile image

        Heather Burns 7 years ago from Wexford, Ireland

        Wonderful of you to do this! We love cats at our house! and they're all spayed and neutered.

      • profile image

        anonymous 6 years ago

        I live in Syracuse, NY and recently adopted a cat from a shelter. Immediately I noticed his health was very poor and we found out that the first test given by the shelter was FIV negative but when our noticed that his condition was worsening, they gave the test a second time and this time it was FIV positive. His health is improving and he very well could lead a long normal life. However, I have four other cats, that sometimes play rough and the possibity of passing this to them though bitting or scratching is too high. If I take the cat back to the shelter they will put him down. If you have any ideas on what I can do him, please let me know. He is so sweet and deserves a second chance. I don't know if you have any contacts in upstate new york but if so, PLEASE PLEASE let me know. Thank you.

      • Franksterk profile image
        Author

        Frankie Kangas 6 years ago from California

        @anonymous: Sarah, I'm so glad you adopted him. I'm sorry he tested positive for the FIV antibodies. I don't have any contacts in New York. Things you can try: create flyers and post in vet offices, pet supply stores, grocery stores. The shelter you got the cat from may also be willing to post your flyer. Testing positive for FIV antibodies should not be a death sentence but I know most shelter still kill them. You might also call around to some of the animal non-profits in your area. They may know of a group that would take him. Good luck. Let me know how you do. Frankie

      • profile image

        anonymous 6 years ago

        @Franksterk: Thank you for your suggestions. I do appreciate it. I will definitely put up flyers at our vet and other places. I already love him so much and wish I could keep him but no matter what I am determined that he will find a loving home. I did try to contact our local news to let them know that FIV positive cats are given a zero chance here in NY and hope that they will use my suggestion to do a small story just to give people the knowledge that FIV cats need homes too and that they can live out a normal life span in the right situation.

      • Franksterk profile image
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        Frankie Kangas 6 years ago from California

        @anonymous: Please keep me informed on how you do. He deserves a good home and it sounds like you are determined to find one for him. I do know people who have half their house closed off and cats in both areas that don't play well together. I don't know if that would work for you but it could be worth a try if you can do it.

      • profile image

        anonymous 6 years ago

        I also live in upstate new york and recently a stray cat appeared at our house. We brought it to the vet and it tested positive for FIV. We have another cat and are not willing to risk the chance of transmitting the disease to him, so we too need to find a place for "tommy". The vet is literally giving us two days to make a decision because we can't bring him back into our home with our other cat. The humane society is not even taking healthy cats right now let alone sick ones! Our hands our tied and we are so sad. We have no other options.

      • profile image

        anonymous 6 years ago

        Deborah : For the time being, is it possible to keep him in a spare room until something works out so at least you don't have to rush into any decisions? Also, I'm not sure where you live but I do know that there is a FIV positive shelter in Buffalo, NY but you have to live in Eire County for them to help you.

        It is totally your decision --- But I did a lot of research on how contagious FIV is to other cats and it really is a weak virus, a lot weaker than HIV is for humans. The risk of infections is through bites that draw blood and serious scratches which really only happen during serious territorial fights. I know there are mixed feelings on the matter, but I did find a lot of examples of people who have FIV and non-FIV living together with no problems -if the cats are kept inside, neutered and introduced properly so they are not aggressive with each other.

      • profile image

        anonymous 6 years ago

        Just wanted to see if you had any advice for my situation (or contacts that may be able to offer advice?) Several months ago, a stray wandered into our yard with a sever abscess that had burst. He was treated at a vet clinic for it. Meanwhile, I searched for help on how to deal with him. The local shelters said he would be put to sleep if turned in to them, and that was not the outcome I was hoping for. I currently live with my parents, who are VERY against letting this boy in the house, but are okay with me feeding/caring for him outdoors. I found an organization that was willing to cover his medical costs for a second abscess he later got, as well as pay for his neutering & shots. So he has been neutered & vaccinated, but unfortunately tested positive for FIV. He is a loving, young (around 2) year old boy who desperately wants to be an indoor cat. I can't bring him in, and he is still fighting after his neuter. I am at my wits end, as I know for his own safety and the safety of other cats, that he needs to be indoors, but unfortunately, that is not an option for me. I can't bring him to the shelter knowing they will put this otherwise healthy and loving cat to sleep, but I am so torn because I don't want him spreading his FIV. Most organizations I've been in contact with are swamped with kitten season & don't have available fosters for him. Anyway, thought you may be able to point me in the right direction. Thanks in advance for your response!

        ps-located in California

      • Franksterk profile image
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        Frankie Kangas 6 years ago from California

        @anonymous: Sarah is right. Non-aggressive cats can live together with non-aggressive FIV cats. They should all be indoors only, and spayed/neutered and not pass on FIV. It is really unfair for a vet to make you do this. It is easy to introduce cats to each other gradually and see if they get along. I recommend you find another vet. At least get a second opinion. There are vets out there that are up to date with the latest research and don't just kill instead of researching the illness. Please, please reconsider your vets recommendation.

      • Franksterk profile image
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        Frankie Kangas 6 years ago from California

        @anonymous: Sara: 2 quick thoughts: 1. talk your parents into letting the cat into 1 room of the house, either your bedroom or the garage. 2. get a friend to take him in, perhaps splitting the cost of food.

        Good luck and keep us informed of your progress.

      • profile image

        anonymous 6 years ago

        Are you aware of any rescue organizations in the South? I am in Texas and looking for someone to take my 10 year old FIV cat in. I work out of town and am unable to take her with me. My son has been caring for her, but is no longer able to do so. Currently I have someone checking on here everyother day, but that is not fair to her. She is a great cat that deserves a great home. It is killing me to give her up, but I have no choice. I just can't find anyone willing to take her. Any suggestions?

      • Franksterk profile image
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        Frankie Kangas 6 years ago from California

        @anonymous: I don't know of anyone in the south at this time. We are a fairly new organizations. My husband and I have been rescuing FIV cats for 3 years, but just got our 501(c)(3) nonprofit status with the IRS. We are looking for volunteers to help reach out and find other organizations that care for FIV cats. (That allows us to get grants and donations are all tax deductible. If you send me your email, I'll be glad to add you to my list to contact as we expand and find others who do similar work. To send me your email, do NOT post it here. Instead, click Frankster and then click on the CONTACT link. That way only I get your email address. Good luck to you. Frankie

      • profile image

        anonymous 6 years ago

        Thanks for the reply. Unfortunately, no such luck so far. My parents are firm that they don't want cats indoors. I recently discovered a litter of 5 babies living with their feral mama in the neighbors yard & have been taking care of them too (and will be getting mama spayed). My parents are frustrated with the situation, and unfortunately don't have the same soft spot that I do for these kitties. They've made it pretty clear that if the cats come inside-I have to move out :( Also, most of my friends are cat lovers who are at full capacity themselves right now, but I will continue searching. Thanks for the advice! If you do hear of any rescue groups that may cater to this cat's situation in CA, please post here! (or let me know if you need my email address) I would love so much for this boy to get his second chance, and I know his clock is ticking as an outdoor cat (he showed up today feeling badly & with ANOTHER abscess! yikes!)

      • Franksterk profile image
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        Frankie Kangas 6 years ago from California

        @anonymous: Good luck, Sara. Keep me posted. Wish I could do something to help.

      • Virginia Allain profile image

        Virginia Allain 6 years ago from Central Florida

        I've lensrolled this to Sam: Feline Leukemia Survivor.

        You've done a wonderful job pulling the information together.

      • profile image

        julieannbrady 6 years ago

        Frankie! Ah, fabulous. Allow me to repeat myself please ... My dear, that is wonderful news. Congratulations on the non-profit status and I wish you a remarkable future and journey.

        Thanks for letting me know. God speed to you and the wonderful cats who are so LUCKY. Bear hugs too! ;)

      • profile image

        anonymous 6 years ago

        Great lens, wonderful cause. God speed you in your work.

      • KimGiancaterino profile image

        KimGiancaterino 6 years ago

        Congratulations for being accepted to the Squidoo Charity program. This is an excellent resource -- most people don't know the facts about FIV. My FIV kitty lived a long and fairly normal life, alongside other cats who were not infected. Thank you for your care and compassion.

      • Franksterk profile image
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        Frankie Kangas 6 years ago from California

        @KimGiancaterino: Thanks Kim for your support and your comment. Cats testing positive for FIV antibodies can live long, healthy, happy lives. The Secretary of our charity had a cat that was tested positive at a very young age and live to 21 years! We have two 15-yr olds in FIVCR currently.

      • indigoj profile image

        Indigo Janson 6 years ago from UK

        What a great new charity and an informative lens about FIV. Love your Zazzle gifts too. Leaving an angel blessing here and wishing FIV Cat Rescue the best of luck.

      • Mickie Gee profile image

        Mickie Goad 6 years ago

        So glad you are here on Squidoo. I never knew about this virus. Blessed today by this Squid Angel.

      • Franksterk profile image
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        Frankie Kangas 6 years ago from California

        @indigoj: Thank you!

      • Franksterk profile image
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        Frankie Kangas 6 years ago from California

        @Mickie Gee: Thank you!

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        anonymous 6 years ago

        I just rescued an FIV positive cat. I already have 4 FIV negative cats. I'm looking for a home for the new cat -- any suggestions.

        Please, he is really sweet and would be wonderful as an only cat or with other FIV cats. FIV cats do not have a short life expectancy and FIV is not easily transmittable. He shows no FIV symptons and is very loving and gentle. Gets along with my dog and other cats.

        I have already spent $300 on him because he was bitten in the eye by a dog. Now I find out the poor baby is FIV positive. I will keep him if I can't find him a good home but I am poor. Is there some place that will help with the medical costs connected with FIV? Some place that will help with the medical costs for rescues?

        please reply to pat725@insightbb.com

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        Frankie Kangas 6 years ago from California

        @anonymous: Thanks for the email, Pat. I will conact you via email. Thank you for saving this little guy.

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        anonymous 6 years ago

        @indigoj: Hello. I have a FIV+ cat for 2 years, since she was 2 months age. It is symptomatic and she needs treatment constant. I do not achieve to raise her white blood cells with anything. She has now 2.100wbc. I tried a lot of immune support stimulants like bioactivator (capha pharma), Maitake, Viusid (used in VIH people), interferon, propolis, echinacea... and nothing worked.

        Do you know for your experience something that I could try now??

        I appreciate your help and opinion.

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        anonymous 6 years ago

        My mother passed away last week and I'm having a difficult time finding homes for her two sweet FIV kitties. We're currently in Tampa, FL where she lived, but I have to fly back home to Little Rock on Thursday. If there is anyone who can help me find them homes please let me know. Thx so much.

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        Frankie Kangas 6 years ago from California

        @anonymous: Hi Erica. I'm sorry to hear about your mother. I do not know of any groups in Florida but FIV Cat Rescue is fairly new and we are just building up our network. You might try Best Friends. I know they have facilities for FIV cats but are in Utah. They may be able to point you in the right direction however. Good luck to you.

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        anonymous 6 years ago

        So glad to find this organization! My sweet baby Chewy passed away last week from a bladder infection on top of the virus. We had no idea that he had this virus until it was too late. Our Chewy would have been 3 in October... I have been so devastated by his loss, but I really want to do something to honor his life/memory. I live on the east coast and would love to know if you are aware of any organizations out this way that save FIV positive cats?

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        Frankie Kangas 6 years ago from California

        @anonymous: HI Kristin, I'm so sorry for your loss of Chewy. Letting go of a cat can be so hard especially with one so young. I do not know of an FIV organization in your area. We are just getting started and hope to gather names and create a database of groups across the U.S. that do rescue FIV cats. You might contact your local shelter to see if they know of a person or group that does what we do. If you don't find one you could make a donation in Chewy's name to them. If you can't find one,you could make a donation in Chery's name to FIV Cat Rescue via the Donate button above. Our wish list of needed items is also above, Your donation would be tax deductible and you could request what it is to be use for. Any donation would be appreciated and all funds are used 100% for the FIV cats. No volunteer, officer or director receive any compensation.

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        BuckHawkcenter 6 years ago

        Fanatastic organization! Thanks for doing this lens. I have featured it on The Best of Pet Rescue on Squidoo.

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        anonymous 6 years ago

        LOVE LOVE LOVE this! I work at an animal shelter in New Jersey and I adopted an FIV+ cat. She is amazing! I have been researching a lot about FIV lately and hope to start an FIV rescue over in this area. My cat LOVES other cats and I am adopting another FIV cat from my shelter this week. This organization is wonderful!

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        Frankie Kangas 6 years ago from California

        @BuckHawkcenter: Thank you!

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        Frankie Kangas 6 years ago from California

        @anonymous: Alyssa, let me know when you get your group in New Jersey set up. We are putting together a list of groups nationwide (or worldwide) that rescues and finds homes for FIV+ cats.

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        anonymous 6 years ago

        @Franksterk: hi all - I just rescued a kitty Bob, who I found out is FIV...can't take him, too many animals at home and a 91 year old mom, but am actively trying to find a home situation for him. Not sure where to turn, he is a sweet kitty, @5-6 years old, just had him fixed, Was going to TNR but don't want to do that now. He is now in my shed in a big dog crate but its lonely, I work all day and the weather is getting cold....any suggestions. I have emailed every person and organizartion I could think of.. Appreicate any input or ideas. Thanks.

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        Frankie Kangas 6 years ago from California

        @anonymous: You could try what is done In our area, after trapping and neutering a feral cats, some loners and others when possible, are found barn homes.They rid the property of mice, etc. and the person feeds them daily and takes care of their needs. Also try flyers but be sure to check out the person and their home so you know it is legit. There are bad folks out there that sell cats to research facilities and worse. Keep me posted on your progress.

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        anonymous 6 years ago

        Sept. 18, 2010

        Summit County, CO

        Hi, thank you for this great information!

        I am looking for a home / shelter to take an FIV positive neutered male kitty -- he is currently with a local non-profit humane society, but he only has a few days left before they put him down. He is in central mountain Colorado. I have tried to contact a shelter on the Front Range that takes FIV positive cats, but have not heard back yet. Am hoping to find a legitimate home or shelter situation -- I will provide transportation and paperwork -- before Wednesday next week, when his time runs out.

        If you can assist or have helpful information, please email: susanjg66@hotmail.com.

        Thanks! :-)

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        Frankie Kangas 6 years ago from California

        @anonymous: Susan, Although we are unable to take any more cats at this time, I'm sending you an email with some suggestions which I hope might help. Thank you for all you do for animals. Frankie

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        anonymous 6 years ago

        hello--i just recently took a 1 yr old male cat (intact) that came up to my house one evening to my vet. He had a wound on his back and since I have 2 other partially outdoor cats (1 a large male that was hissing at him),i knew i needed to take him away from them. I figured he had been dumped or wandered from his home since he was a young male. After getting him to the vet I decided to try to find his home. I live in the country and went to all of the neighbors within a 2 mile area and then posted signs in the closest small town. No luck at this point finding his owner. So the vet and I decided we should prepare him for adoption. First thing she did was run a FIV/FEL test. Sadly, It came back positive for FIV. I had always thought FIV was a death sentence until I went online and found your site and started reading more about it.

        I have a close friend that took in an FIV positive Siamese that they had befriended and he has been the picture of health ever since they have had him. (about 5 yrs). So i thought well maybe there are adoption rescues that are out there to help with a case like this and maybe other options for this cat, that i call Thomas. I have ask the vet to retest him. also, do a complete blood chemistry, and check him for worms and parasites. He has been at the vet since Monday, Sept 27. he has been happy, healthy acting, and is very socialable.

        I knew he was someones cat when i loaded him in the crate. he was just so friendly. i am having an immense issue with allowing him to be euthanized when he appears at this point to be completely healthy other than the FIV diagnosis. I am wondering if you have any suggestions on adoption or rescue places in my area. I live in Oklahoma, but we travel all over. he is very handsome. long and slender, orange tabby with white on face and body and very sweet. please help me with info on finding him a home if you can. thank you.

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        anonymous 6 years ago

        do you vacinate your FIV+ cats?

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        Frankie Kangas 6 years ago from California

        @anonymous: Not for FIV nor FELV but for the other diseases. Our cats all live indoors only even those that are not FIV+.

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        Frankie Kangas 6 years ago from California

        @anonymous: Hi Glenda,

        Unfortunately, I am in California and currently full to the rafters (literally, 1 cat loves the height and found a way to get into the garage roofing structure, coming down only for meals and a quick brushing). I don't know any shelters that are taking in FIV cats right now, but my knowledge on the nationwide situation is severely limited.

        Could it be possible for you to adopt him? It is quite common for cats,especially males, to hiss at each other at first. It just means, "I don't know you -- go away!" Once your cats see that he is not going away, they generally adjust to the situation. It is commonly recommended that one place the new cat in a room of his own for 2 weeks and let them get used to each other's smells under the door. Then release the new cat and watch them carefully with a spray bottle of water handy to break up any disputes. I've seen mortal enemies turn into the best of pals.

        And all the cats involved should be neutered, in case they are not already.

        I hope you or someone you know will take him in. FIV should not be a capital crime.

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        three c86a4 6 years ago

        Very informative lens. It's wonderful to see people helping cats with FIV. I am adding you to my cat lenses.

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        anonymous 6 years ago

        First of all, thank you for your hopeful and life-affirming web site.

        I am currently fostering an 8-week-old kitten who was brought alone to the city animal shelter (pound) at the age of 6 weeks. He tests FIV+ and would not have survived at the shelter. Unfortunately, the poor little guy has been sick almost since he arrived. He is struggling with an awful URI. We've been to the vet 3 times in the past week, and are doing everything we can to keep him comfortable. We are committed to him no matter what, but wonder what are his chances of surviving this infection.

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        Frankie Kangas 6 years ago from California

        @anonymous: I do not know exactly how sick your little guy is but have hope. I've seen kittens have URI for months finally get over it. They often get it more often after that than other cats so they really need to be kept indoors. Good luck to you. Please let me know how he does. Thank you for all you do for animals. Bear hugs, Frankster

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        gods_grace_notes 6 years ago

        Frankie, I love your heart for helping animals in need and your passion for making sure they are loved. Congratulations on becoming a Squidoo sponsored charity!!! You are a terrific advocate. Give all those kitties a hug for me, too! Connie

        Bootsie, Max, Toughie & Grace send their love as well...

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        Ann_Coltin 6 years ago

        Thank you for this lens and raising awareness and clearing up misconceptions about FIV. I adopted a FIV cat and he was with me for 10 years and lived a loving, playful and pampered life.

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        Frankie Kangas 6 years ago from California

        @gods_grace_notes: Thank you Connie. I will pass the hugs along. Bear hugs back at ya! Frankie

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        Frankie Kangas 6 years ago from California

        @Ann_Coltin: Thank you. It is frustrating when perfectly healthy cats are killed because the test positive for the FIV antibody. It's crazy especially given the fact that some young cats can be tested later and not test positive. Your kitty was lucky to have found someone like you. If you are looking for another FIV+ cat, just let me know. ;-) We have some great cats in our rescue.

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        anonymous 6 years ago

        Thank you for your good work. We just lost our beloved TomCat to FIV and are looking for a canadian organization likeyours. Would you know of one?

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        Frankie Kangas 6 years ago from California

        @anonymous: Sorry, I don't know of a group in Canada taking care of FIV cats. We are a newly formed organization and we don't know of many others yet. We hope to have a network of groups so we can help as many FIV cats as possible either by rescuing and finding them homes or by educating the public that FIV positive cats can live long, happy, healthy lives with the right care. You might be able to find some by spending some time on a search engine like google. Good luck to you. Let me know what you find if you would.

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        anonymous 6 years ago

        Frankster, you have the very best of hearts! Get this, I can give ou a living testimonial that cats with FIV can live wonderfully happy lives in a loving home. My brother and sister-in-law have a cat with FIV. They got Peak as an adult and he already had FIV about 6 or 7 years ago. Peak is a beautiful long haired Siamese with the sweetest disposition possible in a cat. This is a very loved cat whose every catly whim seems to be satisfied, no stress for Peak. This is a great lens and is good news for folks who are owned by a cat with FIV.

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        anonymous 6 years ago

        Just so you know, I do remember blessing this back while I was an angel. At that time I didn't know that Peak had FIV.

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        anonymous 6 years ago

        I have an FIV positive cat - Sawyer and 4 other cats that do not have FIV and we have worked out a system that really works for us. He was a stray that is still new to the family and less than a year old. Since he is still learning how to be around other cats (I call it cat edicate) and he is very energetic I was apprehensive about having him with all the other cats at once and all the time because they are all big males that do sometimes get into it with each other so we came up with a solution that works great for us. Sawyer stays upstairs in a large bedroom while we are at work that has everything he needs in it water, food, etc.. and then when we come home in the evenings and weekends he's out with everyone under our supervision. This is working out really good, because he gets the safety his own space but also the interaction with the other cats and it hasn't been overwhelming to anyone. I hope that FIV positive cats will be given a more of a chance someday. If didn't take him in the SPCA would have had him put down and we would have never have gotten to know such an intelligent and loving boy.

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        Frankie Kangas 6 years ago from California

        @anonymous: That is a great system. Sawyer is very lucky to have you. As you say he would have been killed at a shelter if you hadn't. Thank you for having such a big heart. Keep us updated on how he is doing.

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        anonymous 6 years ago

        Hi, we are looking for help with our FIV+ cat. We found him on our porch a few weeks ago and just had him tested to see if he was sick. He tested FIV+. We have 7 other cats, one of whom is extremely aggressive. The stray, River is a beautiful Himalayan Rag-Doll. We can not keep him, we are concerned about spreading the illness to the other 7. We are looking to adopt him out or find a shelter for him that will adopt him out. Our vet recommended doing a search online and I found you! Can you help us or point us in the right direction? Thank you!

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        Frankie Kangas 6 years ago from California

        @anonymous: I wish we could take River ourselves but we are way over capacity being a very small organization. Contact me at frankie@FIVCatRescue.org and give me a little more info: where are you located (city/state)? How old do you think River is? Has he been neutered? You say you tested him to see if he was sick; did he appear sick? Most cats that test positive for FIV are healthy and never get aids. They can live love, healthy, happy lives with the proper care (see "How to keep an FIV cat healthy" above). Frankie

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        anonymous 6 years ago

        I have a beautiful male cat that was found in a hunting camp here in Ga. He has 5 toes on his paws and is the sweetest, loving, grateful cat. I jusy had him tested and he is FIV positive. Can anyone take him in? 404-379-7736. He weighs 10 lbs and is a B/W longhair.

        I DO NOT WANT TO PUT HIM DOWN. Thanks for your help in advance

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        anonymous 6 years ago

        @Franksterk: My son brought me a stray cat that was in need that has aids. He has been at my house for a few weeks and I do not have a place to keep him for long,,,for I have 6 cats who are fiv neg. and 3 dogs. He is currently living in a tool shed that I fixed up for him in hope that I can find a rescue or home for him. He is not happy in isolation and I will not have the heart to keep him like this for long. If anyone knows of a rescue for aids cats close to Alabama, please call me 256 312-0666

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        Frankie Kangas 6 years ago from California

        @anonymous: Sounds like a beautiful cat.I do not know of a rescue group near you but maybe one of our readers does. Couple quick ideas: check your local shelter, they may know of a group that would take him; advertise if you can afford it; put up flyers; report on "found" newspaper or radio shows. I found a stay cat who had been coming for breakfast and dinner for about 3 weeks. He was so friendly and wonderful. I took him to the local no-kill Humane Society and they found he had a microchip and found his owners. He was also tested positive for FIV and his owners took him back anyway. (This was 2 weeks ago.) Maybe you'll get lucky. I had instructed them if he tested positive for FIV that I'd take him back. Lucky his owners loved him anyway.

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        anonymous 6 years ago

        @anonymous: Just so you will know, this tool shed is back of a garage enclose, large and has a window and storm door. I take him in the basement and crate him at night when it's cold. But he only sees me once a day for about 15min. That is the best I can do. He is a great cat and needs more attention.

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        anonymous 6 years ago

        @anonymous: I too have one FIV+ adult male cat, one adult female cat who arrived with him and two kittens, one male 14wks and one female 12 weeks (all rescue animals) who all live happily side by side in our household. We did have an FIV+ female but she was older when she was rescued and very poorly but we gave her 6 months of love and care before we lost her to FELV. We have the back garden secured with a special cat fence so that they can all play in the garden and none of the neighbourhood cats are in any danger. If we hadn't taken Sully and his mate, they both would have been pts and we would have missed out on the most loving, affectionate, adorable boy in the world and his crazy, slightly autistic, mate. He's missing an eye from previous fights when he was a feral and he's missing chunks out of his ears but he settled into domesticated bliss so easily that it's as if he'd just been waiting for someone to find him and love him. He's a great big brother to the kittens and never uses his teeth or claws and I'm grateful for every moment I have with him. On the whole, he's a health cat but we whisk him to the vet at the slightest hint of anything wrong so we catch it early. He came down with pneumonia a few weeks ago and was on medication for three weeks but he's back to full health again. I know it sounds crazy but it's as if he knows he's been given a second chance and is paying us back with more love than we could have ever imagined. As with HIV, people will, in time realise that it's not a death sentence and it's not necessarily a risk to other cats and then poor unfortunate FIV+ cats will have a chance at a long and happy life.

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        rosannacorrea 6 years ago

        Hi, about a year and a half ago a gorgeous stray taby started hangin around my house, I felt bad for the little guy so I began to feed him. After some time, he began to trust me and my kids and never left, he adopted us and we fell in love with him. My children named him "Sweet" and he more than lives up to his name, he's a wonderful kitty. A couple of weeks ago he went missing and when he came back, he was hurt and had a broken shoulder. We are drowning in bills and on the verge of losing our only source of income but somehow I convinced my husband that he needed to go to the vet, I got some financial assistance through organizations and when I brought him home I was notified that he was fiv+, I had no idea this even existed in felines, after all the hard work, the vet tech told me he would die. I've done so much research and I now know he can live a long healthy life. I brought home and he was eating on his own and doing great. A few days ago, he caught a cold and now he's slowly deteriorating, he won't eat or get up anymore and my heart is breaking because I have no financial means of helping him. I'm desperate, please help me.

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        Frankie Kangas 6 years ago from California

        @rosannacorrea: Hi Rosanna, I have 4 suggestions for you:

        (1) Call the organization that helped you financially and tell them that Sweet has URI and is in need of antibiotics. This should not cost them very much so they may help you.

        (2) I just posted a blog entry of organizations that help with emergency medical care. However, don't be surprised if they say since he is FIV+ that they will not help.

        (3) When they have URI, they tend to not be able to smell so no food smells good enough to eat. They may also be nauseated. I have brought several cats back from what seemed near death just be forcing them to eat until they ate on their own. The best thing is to find a cat rescuer in the area to show you how to get the Sweet to eat.

        Here is basically how you do it: you put a little on your finger and force his mouth open and scrape the food off of your finger behind the back of his top teeth. (It's hard to put in writing.) Usually, the cat will begin to eat then. You have to get him to eat multiple (5-8 times) times a day so that he gets enough food. Even getting up in the middle of the night to feed Sweet a couple of times would make a difference in his heath.

        Tell me where you are located. I've been trying to get a registry of FIV+ rescues and sanctuaries together. I've just started so I don't know many but maybe one is in your area and could assist you.

        I wish FIVCR could help with medical bills but we are in a constant struggle to care for the 17 cats we have.

        Let me know what works for you and Sweet. Frankie

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        anonymous 6 years ago

        HI! I am a frequent stray rescuer who has just picked up an FIV+ kitty. He's super friendly but I'm hitting major road blocks in trying to find somewhere or someone to take him. He is incredibly affectionate and unfortunately staying in our garage because we have 3 other cats in our house. I live in Florida and I am willing to drive him anywhere that will save his life. It just isn't fair to keep him alive just to live in the garage :( HELP!

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        Frankie Kangas 6 years ago from California

        @anonymous: Shannon, There is a place in Florida called Caboodle Ranch, which I have NOT personally checked out, that has just built a place to take care of FIV cats at their ranch. You can check them out at http://www.caboodleranch.com/.

        I recently got an email with the following info (don't know if they will have the info for groups that accept FIV cats or not):

        The nonprofit World Environmental Organization recently launched the

        world's most comprehensive guide to Animal Rescue Groups:

        www.RescueShelter.com

        Tens of thousands of groups, helping all breeds of dogs, cats, horses

        and other animals, in over 150 countries, are listed. The site also

        features a worldwide directory of wildlife rehabilitators.

        Good luck Shannon. Please let me know where you end up placing the cat.

        Frankie

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        Maydusa 6 years ago

        Nice work!!

        Another great animal charity is the Brown Dog Foundation. Brown Dog Foundation offers pet owners in a temporary financial crisis an alternative to euthanasia when their pet faces a treatable, life-threatening condition. The organization also provides funds to rehabilitate dogs and cats who have been affected by natural disasters, pet mills, rescues, and shelters. Please join them to help people and their pets.

        http://www.causes.com/causes/78227-brown-dog-found...

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        anonymous 6 years ago

        I have a 7 mth old male I rescured from the street. I call him Murphy. He has been confirmed with FIV. I am looking for a home for him as I have a 4yr old female cat and a large dog as well. He is currently living in my bedroom but desparately needs more room. I found your wonderful site and think you are amazing for the work you do. Do you know of any FIV site in Canada?

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        Frankie Kangas 6 years ago from California

        @anonymous: Linda, I'm sorry but I don't know any groups in Canada. You might call a few animal shelters in Canada and ask if they know of any groups that take in FIV+ cats. I'll let you know if I do hear of any. If you find one, please write back so it may help others.

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        anonymous 6 years ago

        I work at an animal hospital in SE Michigan, I own about 35 cats. Some indoor only, some "outdoor" only, some both, all have been rescued - kinda comes with the job. Last week a client relinquished a 4 month old kitten they found eating their garbage, I agreed to take him. He came up FIV +. I can't risk the health of my colony who have all tested negative. I have contacted several rescues, including ones in TN, GE, NJ - I'm willing to travel. Only one returned my inquiry. I will take care of all medical expences as far as kitten vaccines, neutering, etc, until he reaches a rescue or home. I will take any and all suggestions in helping him find a home/rescue, I will even keep him until he is 6 months old and can be re-tested if need be. I've named him MercyMe.

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        Frankie Kangas 6 years ago from California

        @anonymous: Hi Shan, Thank you for all of the work you do for animals. MercyMe and the others are very lucky. I wish I could be more helpful but the only thing I can suggest at this point is to retest him when he is 6 to 8 months old. Hopefully he will test negative for the antibodies and you can find him a home. We cannot take him and in the short time we've been around I've not heard of a place near you. However, the following may help you find a home before then:

        1. I just got an email with the following info (don't know if they will have the info for groups that accept FIV cats):

        The nonprofit World Environmental Organization recently launched the

        world's most comprehensive guide to Animal Rescue Groups:

        www.RescueShelter.com

        Tens of thousands of groups, helping all breeds of dogs, cats, horses

        and other animals, in over 150 countries, are listed. The site also

        features a worldwide directory of wildlife rehabilitators.

        2. There is a group in Florida called, Caboodle Ranch. The url is http://www.caboodleranch.com/Contact_Us.html This link takes you to the CONTACT Page but from there you can also take HOME to see their video and read about them. They just built a separate place for FIV / FeLv cats. I wrote them to make sure they have the FIV and FeLv cats separated as FeLv is passed so easily and is pretty deadly. No reply.

        3. In California I just found an incredible group called, The Cat House on the Kings. Their url is http://www.cathouseonthekings.com The woman who started this is absolutely amazing. She does have a separate area (see the FACILITIES page) to house I believe 10 to 12 FIV cats. I know she charges money to take a person's pet, however, since you are a rescuer and have no way to take care of the cat, she may be moved to help.

        I hope one of these are able to help. I wish I could do more. If I hear of other places, I'll let you know. Good luck. Please let me know when you find a home or hear of other sanctuaries.

        Best wishes, Frankie

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        Frankie Kangas 6 years ago from California

        @Maydusa: Thank you for your comment and the information on Brown Dog Foundation. Hopefully, it will be helpful to lots of people.

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        anonymous 6 years ago

        @Franksterk: Frankie,

        Thank you so so much for all your information. I will try every avenue you suggested. MercyMe is becoming more and more affectionate everyday, becoming quite comfortable in his living conditions - adaptable little fella. After reading your other postings I had checked out rescueshelter.com and it is a fabulous web-site with tons of info, it would take days to read it all. Thank you again for all your advice.

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        anonymous 6 years ago

        I work at a vet clinic in Eugene OR. Recently a very good client of ours brought in a kitty who was trying to fit into her feral colony but the exsisting kitties would not allow. He is super sweet and had an indoor home down the road but now he keeps "running away" now that there is a new boyfriend. So she brought him to us to help her place and when we ran his FIV test it came back positive and she is unable to keep him at our house. One of doctors said we could take him but put a very short (less than a week!) deadline to find him a program to be put in. All of the organizations we have been in contact with in Oregon are full and some up to Washington. Is there any other ideas on where else he could go? Any room at your sanctuary/rescue? He is a super sweet boy, manx brown tabby with a chunky face. Purrs on contact and loves catnip. The short deadline was just sprung on us, an impromptu decision, and we are all scrambling to try and keep him alive. Any help would be great thank you.

        Christy

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        Frankie Kangas 6 years ago from California

        @anonymous: First, I think that a 1 week DEADline is wrong on some many counts. No animal should be given a week to find a home, especially a healthy animal. Cats who test positive for FIV antibodies can live long, healthy, happy lives with proper car -- just like other cats.

        Your vet, by the way, can't know if the cat is testing positive because he was bit and is legitimately testing positive for the antibody OR if he was simply vaccincated for FIV at a previous home. A cat who gets a vaccination will test positive for FIV antibodies all his life. There is no test that can tell the difference at this point.

        First, please give your little guy more time to find a home. Making a decision to euthanize a sick kitty is very hard; to make a decision to kill a healthy cat will be even harder on you. Believe me, having to turn away cats that may end up killed haunts me daily.

        And, yes I did use the words euthanize and kill in the manner I did to make a point. When a cat is so sick that it is suffering or his life is just too hard for him you euthanize him; you put him out of his misery. When a cat is healthy but MAY get sick, it is called killing. It took me a long time to be able to write that but it is the truth. We should not kill animals for what "may happen."

        FIV cat rescue can not take him in. I really wish we could. We are overpopulated and can barely take care of the 17 cats we have. We are so new and small. We also were not meant to be a sanctuary. Our mission is to stop the killing of FIV cats through education of vets, shelters and the public; to get people to foster and/or adopt FIV cats. To create some national programs to get the word out; help create an foster registry of people who want/will adopt FIV cats; create an adoption registry of people who will adopt FIV cats; make it so the vets that do recommend killing FIV cats are educated; to get shelters to adopt FIV cats out, not kill them. The result of all is to stop the killing of healthy FIV cats.

        We ended up with our cats by threats from shelters that pretty much said, "he's being "euthanized" (their word not mine) tomorrow, do you want him"? Of course, we took them. But at some point when we are struggling to care for them, we have to try to find other methods.

        [On a side note; I think this is how hoarders must start. They take in unwanted cats (or dogs) and just keep taking them in even though they can't care for them. We will not become hoarders but I must say I can see how it starts.]

        We are also trying to get a registry together of shelters and rescue groups that take FIV cats. Some may be full at one point, then be able to take one at another time. Our educational programs will help everyone. We are putting together a grant at this time to start the program off.

        I know that doesn't help you right now. I recommend, like I've done with others, that you check the following places:

        The nonprofit World Environmental Organization recently launched the

        world's most comprehensive guide to Animal Rescue Groups:

        www.RescueShelter.com

        Tens of thousands of groups, helping all breeds of dogs, cats, horses

        and other animals, in over 150 countries, are listed. The site also

        features a worldwide directory of wildlife rehabilitators.

        2. There is a group in Florida called, Caboodle Ranch. The url is http://www.caboodleranch.com/Contact_Us.html This link takes you to the CONTACT Page but from there you can also take HOME to see their video and read about them. They just built a separate place for FIV / FeLv cats. I wrote them to make sure they have the FIV and FeLv cats separated as FeLv is passed so easily and is pretty deadly. No reply.

        3. In California I just found an incredible group called, The Cat House on the Kings. Their url is http://www.cathouseonthekings.com The woman who started this is absolutely amazing. She does have a separate area (see the FACILITIES page) to house I believe 10 to 12 FIV cats. I know she charges money to take a person's pet, however, since you are a rescuer and have no way to take care of the cat, she may be moved to help.

        I hope one of these are able to help. I wish I could do more. If I hear of other places, I'll let you know. Good luck. Please let me know when you find a home or hear of other sanctuaries.

      • profile image

        anonymous 6 years ago

        What most struck me was your quest to educate "veterinarians" about this disorder. Good for you!

        Congrats on having one of the 33 Best Charity Profiles!

        https://hubpages.com/community/monsterboards-best_...

      • Franksterk profile image
        Author

        Frankie Kangas 6 years ago from California

        @anonymous: Christy, Please check Caboodle Ranch right away. They will have their FIV/FeLv area up and running in about 4 weeks. Good luck. Let me know what happens. Frankie@fivcatrescue.org

      • Franksterk profile image
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        Frankie Kangas 6 years ago from California

        @anonymous: Thank you! I really appreciate the acknowledgment. It means a lot to me. Bear hugs, Frankie

      • profile image

        anonymous 6 years ago

        I need to find a home for a cat I call "Tab." He is FIV positive, but is otherwise healthy, and the friend I gave him to is unable to keep him inside. She also can't afford a pet. He is incredibly sweet, friendly, handsome grey tabby approximately 8 - 10 years old. I'm in Athens, Georgia. Would anyone be interested? Tab is an absolute treasure!

      • profile image

        anonymous 6 years ago

        There is a kitty named Ragman at Grayson County Humane Society in Leitchfield, KY who is FIV. Is there room in someone's rescue for this little guy? The shelter is very limited in space and run by 4 part time volunteers. It would be extremely generous if someone can find room for him and give him the environment he needs to thrive. Please contact the shelter if you can,

      • Franksterk profile image
        Author

        Frankie Kangas 6 years ago from California

        @anonymous: Good luck finding a home for Tab. He sounds wonderful. Bear hugs, Frankie

      • Franksterk profile image
        Author

        Frankie Kangas 6 years ago from California

        @anonymous: Juliet you might want to post this on our Facebook too. good luck.

      • juliannegentile profile image

        Julianne Gentile 6 years ago from Cleveland, Ohio, US

        Thank you for caring! I hope you had a great St. Patrick's Day. Enjoy the Lucky Leprechaun Blessing!

      • Nancy Hardin profile image

        Nancy Carol Brown Hardin 6 years ago from Las Vegas, NV

        Frankster, I have a friend who saves FIV cats too. I believe, as you both do, that there is no reason to euthanize these little ones. Thanks for sharing this lens.

      • UKGhostwriter profile image

        UKGhostwriter 6 years ago

        Fantastic caring lens - good luck with your endevours

      • profile image

        anonymous 6 years ago

        I enjoyed your lens, good detailed and helpful information. You are doing Gods work...may he bless.

      • DawnMathisenakaC profile image

        DawnMathisenakaC 6 years ago

        What a great and informative lens! I salute you for the work you are doing to rescue FIV cats as there are many misconceptions about them. I know - I have been Mom to 2 FIV cats and love my boys! We found our first one, Spririt as a stray and remember all-too-well the feeling of my heart sinking when I first took him to the vet and was told he tested positive. Up to that point, I was very uneducated about FIV. We had that one, Spirit, for 6+ years and he was the BEST cat and led a great life. Unfortunately we lost him last December to a respiratory infection that he just could not beat.

        In 2008 we adoped a dog from our local shelter and did a "meet and greet" with our cat. There was a cat there with FIV, fortunately our shelter doesn't euthanize and over a period of months we had several conversations that placed Smokie Bones in our home. He was 8-1/2 at the time and still spunky and plays like a kitten. Unlike our other FIV cat Spirit, he is chubby, very healthy and has no side affects of the disease.

        Both of my FIV cats have been very special. Maybe they were given other gifts because they both are sweeter and more sociable than most cats without the disease.

        This is wonderful work towards educating others. Like I said, I was in the dark too until I adopted a cat and learned afterward. FIV cats make great pets and are no threat to canines or humans. Thankfully our shelter and humane society doesn't euthanize them, but it hardly seems a viable reason when there are homes that will take them in placement. Kudos on your work and best wishes! I have "Angel Blessed" your lens as this is a cause I feel passionate about and you did an awesome job!

      • Franksterk profile image
        Author

        Frankie Kangas 6 years ago from California

        @DawnMathisenakaC: Thank you for the kudos, Angel Blessing and for sharing your experience with FIV+ cats. Bear hugs, Frankster

      • profile image

        anonymous 6 years ago

        ~ Dropping by to leave my Angels April Fools' Day Quest Blessings ~

      • profile image

        anonymous 6 years ago

        Thank you for this well informed and very important lens. I, too, worked with a volunteer organization that automatically killed any cat that tested positive for FIV - until finally one volunteer got fed up and began taking all FIV positive cats into her own home. Like you, there is a limit to how many cats one person can take. This knowledge really needs to be spread and become common!

      • lollyj lm profile image

        Laurel Johnson 6 years ago from Washington KS

        This is a wonderful lens. For many years now, hubby and I have been feeding and nurturing strayed or dumped cats and kittens. All are spayed or neutered and live together in harmony.

        We can't adopt any more, but will continue to care for the ones who wander in here.

      • profile image

        Light-in-me 6 years ago

        I had never heard of this before, bless you for doing this lens.

        I learned a lot!

        Robin

      • profile image

        Stonecutter 6 years ago

        I was not at all aware of FIV as a problem for cats. It is disgusting that so often the immediate response is to kill what we don't understand. I am very thankful that you took the time to share this information so that a more educated decision can be made regarding the care of these animals. Excellent lens and well researched. Thank you. Lens rolled to my Pets with Special Needs Lens.

      • Franksterk profile image
        Author

        Frankie Kangas 6 years ago from California

        @Stonecutter: Yes, removing -- usually killing -- something that we don't understand or is inconvenient seems to be a very human response. Sometimes I am embarrassed to be human.

      • Homelust profile image

        Homelust 6 years ago

        This is a very informative lens about a very difficult disease these poor cats sometimes get. God Bless you for giving this information about a very condition that is not well known about.Now maybe more people will not act in haste about the care of these cats. Hopefully a cure will be found, soon.

      • profile image

        anonymous 6 years ago

        Looking for some advice on an FIV positive cat.

        My roommates and I have been feeding a stray un-neutered male cat, "Orange", that has been living on and off our porch for the past 6 months. We have felt bad for him because of his scrawny build and constant abuse from other feral male cats, but mostly because of his horrible wheezing problem. We had discussed taking Orange into a vet to get his wheezing checked out and to get him neutered, but didn't have the funds since we already have three indoor cats to care for. Orange, by the way, is one of the most loving, friendly and happy-go-lucky cats I have ever encountered - this is saying a lot because I have owned and been in contact with many cats in my years.

        Moving on. One morning, about three weeks ago, while leaving for work we noticed Orange was hobbling around with one paw in the air and he looked especially beat up. We decided to take an emergency visit to the vet and got about $600 worth of work done including deworming, neutering, treatment of the abscess in his paw and antibiotics for his wheezing. We also found out that he is FIV positive.

        Now comes the issue. After several weeks inside our house recouperating, Orange is doing pretty well. He has gained some weight and his wheezing issue has improved. We wish we could keep him in our home, but we have three other cats that are currently FIV negative and we hope to keep it that way. Orange can live a perfectly happy life if provided with the right nutrition and indoor lifestyle, but we can't provide that for very much longer. We can't put him back outside just to watch him waste away and we haven't had much luck in finding a new home for him.

        He is such an amazing cat with a radiant glow about him. It is just unfortunate that he hasn't been dealt the best cards. Any suggestions on what to do here?

        Thanks.

      • profile image

        anonymous 6 years ago

        Do you know of a group that rescues FIV cats in Phoenix, AZ? Someone at work is getting married and his fiance owns an FIV cat but he is allergic to cats. They have not been able to find a home and I would hate to see the cat get killed. i already have two cats or I would take him.

        Thanks for all that your organization does to help these cats!

      • Franksterk profile image
        Author

        Frankie Kangas 6 years ago from California

        @anonymous: Thank you for taking care of this obviously wonderful cat. I don't know where you are located but I'd first try flyers to find a home. Put them up at vets offices and shelters.

        We are trying to get a registry together of shelters and rescue groups that take FIV cats. Some may be full at one point, then be able to take one at another time. Our educational programs will help everyone. We are putting together a grant at this time to start the program off.

        I know that doesn't help you right now. I recommend, like I've done with others, that you check the following places:

        The nonprofit World Environmental Organization recently launched the

        world's most comprehensive guide to Animal Rescue Groups:

        www.RescueShelter.com

        Tens of thousands of groups, helping all breeds of dogs, cats, horses

        and other animals, in over 150 countries, are listed. The site also

        features a worldwide directory of wildlife rehabilitators.

        2. There is a group in Florida called, Caboodle Ranch. The url is http://www.caboodleranch.com/Contact_Us.html This link takes you to the CONTACT Page but from there you can also take HOME to see their video and read about them. They just built a separate place for FIV / FeLv cats. I wrote them to make sure they have the FIV and FeLv cats separated as FeLv is passed so easily and is pretty deadly. No reply.

        3. In California I just found an incredible group called, The Cat House on the Kings. Their url is http://www.cathouseonthekings.com The woman who started this is absolutely amazing. She does have a separate area (see the FACILITIES page) to house I believe 10 to 12 FIV cats. I know she charges money to take a person's pet, however, since you are a rescuer and have no way to take care of the cat, she may be moved to help.

        I hope one of these are able to help. I wish I could do more. If I hear of other places, I'll let you know. Good luck. Please let me know when you find a home or hear of other sanctuaries.

      • Franksterk profile image
        Author

        Frankie Kangas 6 years ago from California

        @anonymous: That would be a horrible way to start a marriage by killing an cat. I sure hope it doesn't come to that. I'm sorry, I do not know any in the Phoenix, AZ area, but check out ...The nonprofit World Environmental Organization who recently launched the

        world's most comprehensive guide to Animal Rescue Groups. You should be able to find groups near you.

        www.RescueShelter.com

        Tens of thousands of groups, helping all breeds of dogs, cats, horses

        and other animals, in over 150 countries, are listed. The site also

        features a worldwide directory of wildlife rehabilitators.

        2. The closest I know near your is in California -- an incredible group called, The Cat House on the Kings. Their url is http://www.cathouseonthekings.com The woman who started this is absolutely amazing. She does have a separate area (see the FACILITIES page) to house I believe 10 to 12 FIV cats. I know she charges money to take a person's pet, however, since you are a rescuer and have no way to take care of the cat, she may be moved to help.

      • profile image

        anonymous 6 years ago

        Thank you for the information - I really appreciate it. These are both great sites. I did find a local group through a referral from the HALO organization here in Phoenix. I'm hoping they can help. I offered to foster the cat if the organization can't take him in while they look for a home for him. I'll just have to keep him separated from our other cats. Thanks again for your help.

      • thegogreenpeople profile image

        thegogreenpeople 6 years ago

        Great sight, and tank you!

      • profile image

        anonymous 5 years ago

        I am in Canada and have a wonderful boy who needs a home. He was a stray that my mother in law was feeding. She tried to bring him in but he was fighting with her other cat. My vet agreed to neuter, needles etc and keep him until I found him a home..2 weeks I was given. Now we find out today he has the virus..Not sure if it has progressed to aids and not very educated on the subject. I have 10 rescues already and cannot take the chance especially if he is a fighter..Are there felv rescues in Canada? I am in Ontario..thank you sooooo much for any help

      • Franksterk profile image
        Author

        Frankie Kangas 5 years ago from California

        @anonymous: I'm not sure if you are asking about FeLV OR FIV but I do not know of any FIV or FeLV shelters/rescues in Canada. I suggest you contact your local shelters and even vets and see if they can give you a place. If you find a shelter, please pass the info on to us so we can add them to our database and help the next person who asks in your area. Thank you for all you do for animals and for caring for this little guy and looking for a home for him. Bear hugs, Frankster

      • profile image

        anonymous 5 years ago

        My sister and I recently found a starving cat wondering around my mother's condo. He was literally skin, bones and fleas!! We have taken him in, are feeding regularly and have taken him to a vet for a complete check up. His blood work came out great, but he tested positive for FIV. I wanted to keep him but have been advised by a couple vets not to because he could transmit the virus to my cat. They basically said I should not take the risk. He is sweet boy, and he needs a home!! Any advice??

      • profile image

        anonymous 5 years ago

        Hi, I'm also in Phoenix, AZ. We have 3 cats and 2 dogs. We found a cute, stray kitten around our house and finally decided to adopt her. We took her to the vet and she was tested FIV positive. We have no idea what to do. It is so hot here and the best we can do right now is to keep her outside, give her good food, water, shade and quality time a few times a day. We would appreciate resources and advice. We tried to call so many places but we couldn't even talk to anyone. We put our cat up on Facebook and I'm willing to pay for medical costs. I just need a good home. I'm frantically looking for help since I don't want her to die before we can find a home. If the pound finds her, she will be put down!

      • profilesincolor profile image

        profilesincolor 5 years ago

        Wonderful Lens! Thanks so much for sharing! :-)

      • Franksterk profile image
        Author

        Frankie Kangas 5 years ago from California

        @anonymous: Cornell University, on FIV says :"The primary mode of transmission is through bite wounds. Casual, non-aggressive contact does not appear to be an efficient route of spreading FIV; as a result, cats in households with stable social structures where housemates do not fight are at little risk for acquiring FIV infections."

        Most vets do not keep up with FIV. It is far easier to just tell people to kill the FIV+ cat and some are worried about their liability. So, 30 years after humans got freaked about HIV and turned people into lepers, they are now passing the stigma onto FIV cats -- all for the same reasons -- fear of the unknown and lack of good information. We are working very hard to get a grant to tell vets, shelters, rescues and the general public that having FIV should not be a death sentence. That a cat that tests positive for FIV antibodies can live long, healthy, happy lives. And they are in many, many homes.

        Remember too that a cat that got the FIV immunization will test positive all of their lives. There is no test available today to tell the difference between a cat that was given the immunization or was infected by another cat.

        You can search online the nonprofit World Environmental Organization. You can go to this site, put in your zip code and it will pull up shelters/rescues in that zip code. Keep trying zip codes in your area until you find one. If they take FIV cats, contact them.

        www.RescueShelter.com

        Tens of thousands of groups, helping all breeds of dogs, cats, horses and other animals, in over 150 countries, are listed. The site also features a worldwide directory of wildlife rehabilitators.

        If you find a rescue that does take FIV+ cats, please contact us via the comment section below or via email at Frankie@FIVCatRescue.org so we can have that info available for others. Thank you.

      • Franksterk profile image
        Author

        Frankie Kangas 5 years ago from California

        @anonymous: Search online the nonprofit World Environmental Organization. You many find an organization near you that will take the cat.

        www.RescueShelter.com

        Tens of thousands of groups, helping all breeds of dogs, cats, horses and other animals, in over 150 countries, are listed. The site also features a worldwide directory of wildlife rehabilitators.

        You can go to this site, put in your zip code and it will pull up shelters/rescues in that zip code. Keep trying zip codes in your area until you find one. If they take FIV cats, contact them.

        If you find an organization that does take FIV+ cats, please give me their name, address and contact info so I can make it available to others. Thanks!

      • profile image

        anonymous 5 years ago

        Oy, well done for looking after this poor little mite.

        If this kitten is still very young, I wouldn't take the FIV test too seriously - just yet. If the kittens mother was FIV+ then it could just be the remaining antibodies transmitted from the mother giving a false positive. A good vet will advise you to test again once the kitten is at least 6 months old. And if a kitten is introduced properly it should prevent any fighting or squabbling that ould prompt biting and possible transmission.

        FIV, like HIV, can NOT be transmitted through cats sharing food bowls, cleaning each other, curling up together to snooze or sharing litter trays. It is primarily transmitted from mother to kitten, through cats mating or through bites.

        The important thing to remember is that FIV is not automatically a death sentence. Here in Europe there has been a lot of work done by good vets in figuring out how to manage the disease and how best to treat cats with FIV. It's important to ensure that, as with non-FIV cats, they're neutered as soon as possible and in an ideal world, kept in a secure area or garden to ensure that there's no risk of accidental transmission to neighbourhood cats.

        I have an FIV+ male and his mate (both ex ferals who arrived together) and after 3 years, she is still FIV free. We then took in two kittens who had been dumped at two weeks old and nine months later they're all living in harmony and are FIV free. They were introduced properly and at a young age to ensure that they all got along and we now have a happy, healthy housefull of cats. They are all primarily house cats but we invested in a good cat fence for the garden and they are able to go out there to play, chase flies and lie in the sun.

        Our FIV boy does have the usual health issues but we always race him to the vet at the slightest hint of illness and ensure we stay on top of any potential problems and so far, we've been lucky. We make sure that he gets the best diet and allow him to carry a little extra weight.

        I don't know how pounds in the US treat FIV+ cats but if you don't immediately find a home for your kitten, I wouldn't dismiss the possibility of safe integration with your own cats and a negative test result the next ime round.

      • Diana Wenzel profile image

        Renaissance Woman 5 years ago from Colorado

        This is such a great lens. I rescue cats and did not even know about FIV. Thank you so much for educating me about an issue that is likely to be one that I will encounter. I so appreciate all that you are doing to save these precious creatures.

      • Snakesmum profile image

        Jean DAndrea 5 years ago from Victoria, Australia

        This is a great lens, very informative and interesting. How some people can just dump their pets is beyond me. My cat is FIV+ and at 12 y.o. I expect to have her for a few years more. She's happy and healthy and lives mostly indoors, except when out in her pen when the weather is suitable.

        All the best

        Jean

      • profile image

        anonymous 5 years ago

        I have a neighbor who has vanished over night and we think that something bad has happened to him. He took in a stray kitty and he took her to the vets only to find out she is FIV positive. She was left out which is not like him at all. I finally caught her and I have her in a dog kennel since I have 7 other kitties in the house I use to work for Vet's and they all say don't bring in a FIV positive Kitty in the house because the other one's will catch it. But after reading all your information I'm thinking twice about leaving her in the kennel. She is not a fighter and neither are my other kitty's. But I'm so scared right now. I'm not working and can't not afford vet bills at this momment. Please give me some advice on what to do. I hate having her in the dog kennel cause alls she wants to do is be loved.

      • KarenTBTEN profile image

        KarenTBTEN 5 years ago

        Those kittens did leave a legacy, though it surely is a difficult issue: the loss of kittens you'd been fostering. I found this page because I was making a particular lens into a charity lens and was selecting one. Yes, I'll go with this one. (Just a few charity lens, and each supports a different organization.)

        Also leaving a SquidAngel blessing.

      • Franksterk profile image
        Author

        Frankie Kangas 5 years ago from California

        @anonymous: Sorry to hear about your neighbor and hope he is okay. Thank you for taking in this cat. If you could afford to keep him mixed with your non-agressive cats, I'd say keep him. Since you cannot then below is a place that may help you find a rescue/shelter near you that will take him.

        Tens of thousands of groups, helping all breeds of dogs, cats, horses and other animals, in over 150 countries, are listed. The site also features a worldwide directory of wildlife rehabilitators. When you find some near you read the notes the shelters put in. They should say if they take FIV+ cats.

        www.RescueShelter.com

        Good luck. Let me know if you find one close to you. Good luck.

      • Franksterk profile image
        Author

        Frankie Kangas 5 years ago from California

        @KarenTBTEN: Your reply made me cry 5 years after losing them to ignorance. Thank you FIVCR is their legacy; I just never thought of it like that. Thank you again.

      • profile image

        anonymous 5 years ago

        hello. you have one the best FIV sites i've found. in truth, my son in florida is looking for information/help with their kitten. he forwarded your link to me. i currently reside in sacramento. until 2 months ago, i had two happy cats, with no outward signs of sickness. one became very ill, very quickly with cancer and died that week. and so, the boy, Nekko, is still here, thank goodness. he's approx 12 years old. still active. cuddly or aloof depending on his 'kitty mood'! Nekko is FIV+, full-blown i guess one says. i'd keep him forever but for the following. my house is being foreclosed next month. i will be moving in with one of my sons on the east coast. that household had 2 dogs that do not get along with cats. its their nature, i can't blame them. a shepherd and a doberman. i've been searching for a place for Nekko (called a "blue" short hair, but actually looks grey with long fur). are you able to help me?

      • Franksterk profile image
        Author

        Frankie Kangas 5 years ago from California

        @anonymous: We cannot take him but I can offer some good suggestions of places that might be able to. First, you say you have a son living in Florida. There is a place in FL called Caboodle Ranch (www.caboodleranch.org) that does take FIV cats where they can live inside and outside for the rest of their lives. This would be great if you were driving to live with that son. It is at least a place for him to check out for his kitten.

        You can also check out a site that lists tens of thousands of groups, helping all breeds of dogs, cats, horses and other animals, in over 150 countries. The site also features a worldwide directory of wildlife rehabilitators. When you find some near you read the notes the shelters put in. They should say if they take FIV+ cats.

        www.RescueShelter.com

        Good luck. Let me know if you find one close to you. Good luck.

      • Sylvestermouse profile image

        Cynthia Sylvestermouse 5 years ago from United States

        I know I have been here before, but I couldn't resist returning because today I am visiting the Animal Charities neighborhood today on the "back to school" angel bus tour and I simply must leave behind my blessings.

      • profile image

        anonymous 5 years ago

        Northern Virginia FIV+ kitty needs home

        Do you know anyone who can take an FIV+ kitty we found recently? She's currently at AWLArlington because we couldn't bring her into the house with our own 3 cats. Sheâs a real sweetheart. Theyâll euthanize her this week if an alternative isnât found.

        Would appreciate any reply, lead, or referral...

        THANK YOU. (Please pass this along to anyone you know.)

        Martha (703) 383-9003

        Fairfax, VA

      • Franksterk profile image
        Author

        Frankie Kangas 5 years ago from California

        @anonymous: I put this on FIV Cat Rescue's Facebook page. You can also check out a site that lists tens of thousands of groups, helping all breeds of dogs, cats, horses and other animals, in over 150 countries. The site also features a worldwide directory of wildlife rehabilitators. When you find some near you read the notes the shelters put in. They should say if they take FIV+ cats.

        www.RescueShelter.com Select by state, then read the blurbs to see which ones accept FIV+ cats.

        Let me know if you find any other rescues/shelters/sanctuaries taking FIV+ cats.

        Good luck.

      • profile image

        anonymous 5 years ago

        Hi. I just discovered your site and am pleased to find others that think like I do. I am the proud owner of three wonderful "AIDS cats," but they are just FIV+. Two of them, my unique little ladies, are around thirteen years old or so. I love them to death. Hillary is just as crazy as she has always been, a big, gray bundle of fur that kind of likes to be petted "roughed up style" on her three story cat condo. Duchess is the sweatheart and cuddler. Both get along with my dog. My third FIV+ cat is probably around five or six years old, I think, and unfortuneattely, he is a bit overweight. okay, he is fat.

      • profile image

        anonymous 5 years ago

        @anonymous: Hi Martha you have nothing to fear with your other cats, We have 4 cats and one is an FIV kitten that came to our house stray. They can share food bowls and water with no problem and can only transmit the the disease if they fight and draw blood, or through procreation. The only catch is the FIV cat must be an indoor cat so that she doesn't get sick. Talk to your vet about FIV and they will tell you that they can live quite healthy and long with FIV.

      • Franksterk profile image
        Author

        Frankie Kangas 5 years ago from California

        @anonymous: Be careful, however, many vets have not kept up with FIV research and are still telling people to euthanize the FIV cat or that they can't be with non-/fiv cats. Which is wrong, wrong, wrong. I have lots of info about how to raise an FIV cat up above.

      • profile image

        anonymous 5 years ago

        @anonymous: Hi Ellen. Hopefully it is not too late to help. My name is Michelle and I work @ Brigids Crossing Foundation in Naples. Fl. We are a no kill, no cage, roam free cat sanctuary for cats who are FIV+. We are located on 6 1/2 acres where our residents live happy lives in an environment where they can run, play, climb trees, go fishing by the lake or lounge by the pool. They are fed organic food, have excellent care and access to veterinarians, both traditional and holistic. Play time with the two leggeds, brushing, petting, cuddling and AWESOME catnip parties are all a part of the treatment and care that our beloved residents enjoy ! Please contact us @ www.brigidscrossing.org or by calling us @ 239-591-8425.

      • Franksterk profile image
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        Frankie Kangas 5 years ago from California

        @anonymous: Thank you Michelle. I have forwarded your comment above directly to Ellen's email address. Bear hugs, Frankie

      • profile image

        anonymous 5 years ago

        Hi there,

        First of all, I would like to applaud you for your efforts! As a proud FIV+ kitty owner, I am constantly educating people on the disease and doing my best to change the way people think.

        My cat, Enoch, was diagnosed with FIV in 2005 after having ran out the door and being lost for two months. He was near death-starved to the point that I could see where the bones come together in his skull. His collar had gotten wrapped around his neck and arm and was embedded into the flesh under his armpit. He had also been attacked by another cat and contracted FIV. I felt so guilty for failing to keep him safe and made it my personal mission to ensure that I would do all I could to fight the disease.

        I did a ton of research and came up with an Immune-boosting cocktail that my Vet has started to recommend to her patients with FIV kitties! The difference in Enoch's health was nothing short of amazing. He had constant nail bed infections, respiratory infections and acted sick, depressed and stressed. Since I started him on this cocktail, he has not had ONE infection of ANY sort and his energy levels have tripled. His coat is glossy, he's a loud-mouth and even his gums have yet to show any inflammation. I would highly recommend this to anyone who has FIV+ kitties!

        Giving him the medications is easy: I just mix everything up with a half-cup of soft food-whichever flavor/brand your cat likes best will work. He enjoys his "treat" so much that he meows & yells at me twice a day to prepare it for him! He even likes it when I squirt the DMG directly into his mouth, the little weirdo!

        I will list the products below, along with website links where you can purchase them.

        1. Immugen for Cats:

        http://www.wellvet.com/immugen.html

        2. Oxstrin Optimized Feline:

        http://www.nutramaxlabs.com/vet/products/Oxstrin-o...

        3. Vetri-DMG Liquid:

        http://www.entirelypets.com/vetridmgliquid.htmlqui...

        4. Missing Link for Cats:

        http://www.onlynaturalpet.com/products/168006.aspx

        5. Thorne Research Moducare:

        http://www.onlynaturalpet.com/products/Thorne-Rese...

        I also feed him high-quality kibble. I prefer IAMS. I wish you all the best of luck and admire you for making such an effort to save these amazing animals. take care. :) Alicia

      • Franksterk profile image
        Author

        Frankie Kangas 5 years ago from California

        @anonymous: Alicia. Thank you for your email. I'm so happy for Enoch and you. Can you give me your Vet's contact info. I know my vet would be interested in communicating about this treatment regimen. My vet is also on FIV Cat Rescue's Board of Advisors. You can send it to me at frankie@fivcatrescue.org Thanks so much for your information. Frankie

      • David Dove profile image

        David Dove 5 years ago

        Outstanding contribution to looking after our friends, thank you

      • indigoj profile image

        Indigo Janson 5 years ago from UK

        I wish I could give one of those gorgeous boys, or the darling Princess, a home. I'm over the water and far away, but am paying another visit and am again in awe of all the wonderful work that you do. Thanks so much for stopping by the Caboodle Ranch page that I made. Although I had a link there to FIV Cat Rescue I've also now added you in the sidebar in a Featured Lens spot (felt it stood out more there than putting it in Related Lenses). Keep up the great work, and love and purrs to all your residents.

      • Franksterk profile image
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        Frankie Kangas 5 years ago from California

        @indigoj: Thank you! Bear hugs, Frankie

      • marigoldina profile image

        Heather B 5 years ago

        I admire you so much for all the work you do with FIV positive cats! I am afraid that, as with humans, there is a terrible stigma attached to the disease, leading to grave misunderstandings about its characteristics. Keep up the wonderful work!

      • profile image

        anonymous 5 years ago

        It is so wonderful to meet you here on Squidoo and learn about FIV and FIV Cat Rescue! I made a donation to your organization. Thank you for being the voice and a shelter for cats! You are definitely making the world a better place!

      • Franksterk profile image
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        Frankie Kangas 5 years ago from California

        @anonymous: Thank you for the donation and kind words. And thank you for all you do for our feline friends. Bear hugs and purrs, Frankie

      • Lady Lorelei profile image

        Lorelei Cohen 5 years ago from Canada

        Thank you for this very informative article on FIV in cats. I had heard of this pet illness but really knew nothing of it till I read your article. Thank you for enlightening me and others.

      • profile image

        anonymous 5 years ago

        We were adopted by a stray male orange tabby whom we named T Rex. His face was severly ripped open during a cat fight , so we took him to the vet ,he had a double ear infection and is missing his front teeth. he is such a sweet kitty who loves to cuddle. He is FIV positive and I want to keep him healthy for many years. I knew nothing about FIV until little Rex came into our home we do not know his true age. I am sad that he was not neutered ! He will be nuetered after all of his blood work is complete.

      • Franksterk profile image
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        Frankie Kangas 5 years ago from California

        @anonymous: T Rex is so lucky to have found you. Thank you for all you are doing for him. I'm sure you and he will have a long and wonderful life together.

      • profile image

        anonymous 5 years ago

        Hi I am currently fostering 3 orange and white kittens approx. 5-6 months that have tested positive for FIV and I'm in Desperate need of finding them homes I have already spayed and neutered them any help will be appreciated

      • Franksterk profile image
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        Frankie Kangas 5 years ago from California

        @anonymous: Glad you called me on the phone. My website and blog were hacked so my email address frankie@fivcatrescue.org is NOT working either. Let me know how the hunt for homes went.

      • Franksterk profile image
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        Frankie Kangas 5 years ago from California

        @anonymous: Glad you called me on the phone. My website and blog were hacked so my email address frankie@fivcatrescue.org is NOT working either. Let me know how the hunt for homes went.

      • profile image

        anonymous 5 years ago

        I have a FIV+ stray staying in my apartment right now. He is not aggressive at all but I have to keep him separated from my cats because my alpha male keeps attacking him. We've had him fixed and vaccinated, now we just need to find him a safe indoor home. I am in Huntington Beach but will be willing to travel if the situation is right for this sweet boy. He is very affectionate and you can tell he just wants to be inside with kind people. Please let me know if you can help in any way. Thank you!

      • WriterJanis2 profile image

        WriterJanis2 5 years ago

        I understand your heartbreak. Our family has worked with rescuing and taming ferals. We ended up with a stray,(not feral,) who immeditely took to us. I brought him in to get shots and to be fixed and was told he needed to be put down as he was tested positive and it was the only humane thing to do. Otherwise, he would suffer. To this day, I regret my decision.

      • Franksterk profile image
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        Frankie Kangas 5 years ago from California

        @WriterJanis2: I'm so sorry you also had to go through the heartache of having an FIV cat put down because of the ignorance of a vet. I'm so glad you are now aware and can help to save others from going through the same pain. Bless you for all you do for animals.

      • Franksterk profile image
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        Frankie Kangas 5 years ago from California

        @anonymous: Hi Allison, We are creating a list of places that take FIV cats in the US but it is slow going. The closest one to you that I know about is St. Bonnie's Sanctuary is in Canyon Country, CA near LA.

        You can also check www.RescueShelter.com It lists tens of thousands of groups, helping all breeds of dogs, cats, horses and other animals, in over 150 countries, are listed. The site also features a worldwide directory of wildlife rehabilitators. There you can search for shelter/rescues/sanctuaries near you. When you find them read their information. They should list if they take FIV cats. Good luck. Let me know if you find a place and give me their info so I can add it to the list and help others. Thank you for taking such good care of this cat.

      • profile image

        kengibbons4 5 years ago

        Hi i like the article and just gave you a squidoo like. I am new to squidoo and just wrote a article on tax benefit for care for feral or stray cats and dogs at http://www.squidoo.com/tax-benefit-for-caring-for-... Please check it out and if you like it give me a squidoo like so I know. Thanks

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        anonymous 5 years ago

        Hi,

        We rescued a homeless cat who turned out to be FIV+ and found her a new home.   When the woman found out Susie would have to stay indoors, she decided not to take her.  The person who is fostering her turns out to be allergic to cats and can't keep her any longer.  She has given us a week to find another place for her to go to.  Susie is a very affectionate, friendly cat of 5-7 years who loves attention and really enjoys living inside.  She has been spayed and is up to date on her shots. We live in the Sacramento area, but can travel around Northern California.  A temporary foster home  is badly needed for her while I work to find her a permanent home.

      • Franksterk profile image
        Author

        Frankie Kangas 5 years ago from California

        @anonymous: You could look in the Rescue Shelter website for shelters, rescues and sanctuaries in Nor. Cal. The url is www.RescueShelter.com

        It lists tens of thousands of groups, helping all breeds of dogs, cats, horses

        and other animals, in over 150 countries, are listed. The site also

        features a worldwide directory of wildlife rehabilitators.

        2. In California I just found an incredible group called, The Cat House on the Kings. Their url is http://www.cathouseonthekings.com The woman who started this is absolutely amazing. She does have a separate area (see the FACILITIES page) to house I believe 10 to 12 FIV cats. I know she charges money to take a cat but she will probably work with you on that).

        3. In Fresno, No So Purrrfect Angel is run by Janice Rozzano. You could post a message on their Facebook page at http://www.facebook.com/groups/140136582663190/

        Janice, I believe, is the administrator of the fb page so she should answer you there. Someone who reads about your kitties there may be able to help too.

        We are not able to take any more cats. Good luck.

        Also you could post a picture and info on our facebook page at http://www.facebook.com/pages/FIVCatRescue/1085091...

        Good luck. Frankie

      • sousababy profile image

        sousababy 5 years ago

        Great lens, liked, googled +1'd and added to my lens, 'Living Articles on Squidoo.' Hope it helps!

        Fondly,

        Rose

      • EMangl profile image

        EMangl 5 years ago

        great supportive lens!

      • bames24 lm profile image

        bames24 lm 5 years ago

        sharing this lens with my friends who have cats... :)

      • Everyday-Miracles profile image

        Everyday-Miracles 5 years ago

        Thank you for what you do! If it wasn't for people like you, my family might not have recently added two wonderful companions to our family! Quinn and Guinevere are both FIV+ and the most loving of our (now five) cats. Quinn is also an amputee, but he doesn't have particularly high needs and gets up and down the stairs just fine.

        I'm making a link to this page from the pages for Quinn and Guinevere. I'm working on Quinn's right now. I'll send you the link when I'm finished and I hope that you don't mind me doing so. They are amazing and I'm so glad that we could give them homes. You should have heard the squeals of the shelter staff when they saw our application! It just made my day!

        But really, I think that in some ways our cats save us, not the other way around. They are just wonderful kitties!

      • Franksterk profile image
        Author

        Frankie Kangas 5 years ago from California

        @Everyday-Miracles: Thank you for taking in Quinn and Guinevere. FIV+ cats are like other cats in that they can live long, healthy happy lives. But knowing that most shelters kill them makes them so very special. You are a life saver. Please do send me the links when you are done with the pages and I'll add them to this website. Check us out on Facebook too. Bear hugs, Frankie

      • Everyday-Miracles profile image

        Everyday-Miracles 5 years ago

        @Franksterk: Liked on Facebook and posted the link there on the wall. Quinn's is done, going to do Guinevere's probably some time next week after school work.

      • Everyday-Miracles profile image

        Everyday-Miracles 5 years ago

        I meant to bless and like this lens yesterday but somehow forgot. It's been too long since I wa around here regularly!

      • senditondown profile image

        Senditondown 5 years ago from US

        We rescued an FIV male, Pierre. He was a wonderful cat. He lived out his life here with us until he decided it was time to go. We were truly blessed to have him.

      • Franksterk profile image
        Author

        Frankie Kangas 5 years ago from California

        @senditondown: Sounds like you and Pierre were both blessed. Frankie

      • Franksterk profile image
        Author

        Frankie Kangas 5 years ago from California

        @Everyday-Miracles: Thank you!

      • favored profile image

        Fay Favored 5 years ago from USA

        I'm so glad you do not put these precious kitties down, like a vet wanted us to do. We decided not to have a stray put down and took him into our home. He stayed inside and live another year until he went home on his own. We were there petting him when he left us. I'll never regret giving him the chance to live and be loved. God bless you for what you are doing.

      • CoeGurl profile image

        CoeGurl 5 years ago from USA

        What a wonderful and informative lens for educating people about FIV!

      • Afteretc profile image

        Afteretc 5 years ago

        I have 2 FIV+ cats; Sam and Tabitha. Both were cats in my yard colony. Both turned friendly and I brought them inside. They are shy around strangers and visitors but completely friendly and social with us humans, our two dogs and the other 4 cats in the househld! Thanks for this informative lens - it's great to educate others isn't it?!

      • Franksterk profile image
        Author

        Frankie Kangas 5 years ago from California

        @Afteretc: Yes it is great to educate others especially when it means saving a cat lives. Thank you for all you do for our fine, furred, feline friends. Bear hugs, Frankster

      • profile image

        anonymous 5 years ago

        I just recently began fostering an FIV+ kitty that I found living in a feral colony where I've been doing TNR. He is smart, sweet, and friendly, so I've taken him in and am hoping to find a good home for him after he's neutered. I've been reading everything I can find about FIV+ cats, and your website is so helpful! Just wanted to say "thanks" and God bless you for what you're doing with these amazing animals. :-)

      • profile image

        anonymous 5 years ago

        I just met a kitten who is FIV+ in need of a home. He lost his eye due to trauma, but he definitely has a giant heart. I have another cat who is FIV- and thanks to your site I feel very comfortable taking this bundle of love in and adding to the family. Thank you so much for all your help. You have definitely not let those first 4 kittens pass in vain, they are now your forever guardian angels. Thank you.

      • TransplantedSoul profile image

        TransplantedSoul 5 years ago

        I had never heard of FIV. This is a great educational lens.

      • profile image

        anonymous 5 years ago

        I am a volunteer with a cat rescue in N.C. I discovered a cat colony which I have been caring for.We have trapped 17 so far but 8 have had FIV so far. So sad. The colony is very sick with eye infections and upper respiratory issues. I found a home for a 4 year old male that is FIV positive and he is doing great. I am also fostering an FIV kitten that lost an eye. This is a great site and I will tell others about it. Education on this illness is key.

      • profile image

        SteveKaye 5 years ago

        Thank you for taking care of these precious animals.

      • dahlia369 profile image

        dahlia369 5 years ago

        Great information on something I've never heard about - since I don't have cats.

      • spellbindingsis profile image

        spellbindingsis 5 years ago

        I loved this lens...it is very personal for me. Two of the most amazing cats I ever was honored to own were both FIV positive, one was a stray I took in he was about 4 when he became part of our family his name was Yogi Bear, the second was a cat I adopted through the Space Coast Feline network his name was Spooky he too was FIV Positive and about 6 when I adopted him. Both have since passed on (my heart forever aches for them both) I donated because it feels like a tribute to my sweet fuzzy faces. Please DONATE every little bit counts.

      • Franksterk profile image
        Author

        Frankie Kangas 5 years ago from California

        @spellbindingsis: Thank you for the kind words and for the donation. As you said every little bit helps us to save fiv cats. I totally understand your heart aching for Yogi Bear and Spooky. Some of the special cats come with special ways of getting into our hearts and not letting go. Thank you again. Bear hugs, Frankster

      • profile image

        anonymous 5 years ago

        Yes I love this topic page, as I have been researching about FIV. I recently took in a male cat who came back positive for FIV. I was originally going to take him for adoption to the local shelter after getting him neutered, But At the lake City animal shelter their policy is to put down all FIV and Felv cats. This is sad because ironically enough Mister my FIV +pos cat is actually the most docile cat and loves all animals and people although he is a bit skiddish at times, I suspect someone did miss treat him. Anyways I have been at odds about what to do with and am trying to find either a rescue group, a home with already FIV+ cats or a home with no cats. I am tempted to keep him myself but I have maybe like 8 cats already- lol that is alot and charlie Chaplin is a very sickly and maybe one or two others as well. So I just don't know what to do. Thanks for a site like this as it really in it's own rite helps.. Thank you

      • profile image

        soaringsis 5 years ago

        Great lens, I would love to have a kitten, but do to collectors items, it is a no go, due to the climbing and tail wagging, which knocks items down (no harm intended by the cats). So maybe at a later date it may be possible. I was not aware of FIV.

      • fdurham profile image

        fdurham 5 years ago

        Great topic. I learned so much. Thanks for sharing this information. My cat was a stray and tested slightly positive for FIV. She tested negative at 6 months.

      • Missy Zane profile image

        Missy Zane 5 years ago

        I'm so sorry about your kittens. In Maryland, my rescue (howardcountycats.org) takes in FIV cats. We don't place them in strictly indoor homes though, because we believe the "strictly indoor" lifestyle is way too stressful for cats who have lived outside.

      • profile image

        anonymous 5 years ago

        Wonderful information. I'm a feline lover; have one indoor cat and am feeding a stray. Wished I could have more cats but my cat doesn't get along with others. Bless you for caring for these animals.

      • Franksterk profile image
        Author

        Frankie Kangas 5 years ago from California

        @Missy Zane: Thank your for all you do for FIV cats. I understand the question of stress of living indoors for cats who have lived outside. Bear hugs, Frankie

      • Gypzeerose profile image

        Rose Jones 5 years ago

        This is a lovely, extremely informative lens. I came here as part of a challenge to find a lens that I would love to share, and I definitely want to get the word out about any kind of animal rescue. I sent this out to google plus - I like to use them because as you increase the groups that you send it out to they allow you to add additional people - and also pinned it to two of my boards: Cats and Squidoo Lenses worth Blessing.

      • profile image

        anonymous 4 years ago

        I have 3 kittens that I just found out have FIVS. I am heartbroken over this. I bottle fed, litter trained and make them into such lovable kittens. I am looking for furEVER homes for them. Just dont know what websites I can get to that offer such assistance. I'm on facebook! https://www.facebook.com/angela.novack

      • Pam Irie profile image

        Pam Irie 4 years ago from Land of Aloha

        Bless you for your tireless work with these wonderful animals. You must have been devestated when the shelter put down the kittens. Breaks my heart too. I'm an animal lover too. Needless deaths can be eliminated by spay and neutering at 4 months. :(

      • rallo-smith profile image

        rallo-smith 4 years ago

        Great information on this topic that not many people are educated about and end up euthanizing an otherwise healthy cat. As was the case with your 4 kittens. I'm so sorry for your loss. I rescue healthy cats and currently have 14 of them which are hard enough to place so I can't even imagine your situation. You have a heart of gold. Hugs

      • Franksterk profile image
        Author

        Frankie Kangas 4 years ago from California

        @rallo-smith: Thank you. You had a heart of gold yourself, rescuing 14 cats. Bear hugs, Frankie

      • Franksterk profile image
        Author

        Frankie Kangas 4 years ago from California

        @Pam Irie: Thank you. It was devastating. It was so wrong. To this day, I cannot shake the feeling of helplessness and sadness I felt when I found out those 4 wonderful kittens were dead. Their death, as a visitor earlier, reminded me, was the impetus for starting FIV Cat Rescue to help stop the killing of FIV cats. That thought helps ease some of my sadness. Thanks for visiting. Bear hugs, Frankie

      • Franksterk profile image
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        Frankie Kangas 4 years ago from California

        @anonymous: Angela, we've been exchanging FB messages and emails. What is happening?

      • profile image

        anonymous 4 years ago

        We rescued a beautiful calico cat from my place of work. Guinness had a open wound, we had it fixed and her spayed too. But sadly her blood work came back positive for Fiv. I had recently rescued another cat, same place, but pregnant. Calli was healthy and no Fiv thankfully. We now has ther kittens left plus our original three cats who are wondering what the heck! We isolated Guinness but as she healed from surgery and anemia too she became too hyper to stay in one room. Before we knew she as positive we'd had her with the three cats and since she was weak she got along. BUT now that she's feeling better she has been aggressive with my other girl cats. I have been trying to find her a forever home but there isn't much out there besides your site in Southern California.

        The other suggested sites are not current, any thoughts what I can do? I did order some calming oil and hope it may help sweet Guinness!

        BTW, a hospital parking lot is not a good place to drop off your strays!

      • Franksterk profile image
        Author

        Frankie Kangas 4 years ago from California

        @anonymous: I'm surprise you say the other sites aren't current. All have either been contacted directly or their websites still show they take FIV cats. They may be full, but we list them because they can be full one week and then available another week. Where are you located? (City, State)?

      • Franksterk profile image
        Author

        Frankie Kangas 4 years ago from California

        @anonymous: You can also check out the site listed in the first module after the introduction, Rescue Shelter http://www.www.rescueshelter.com/ for organizations in your area. Once you find them, you simple read their description to see if they mention take FIV cats. If they don't list it, it is likely they do not take them.

      • profile image

        anonymous 4 years ago

        @Franksterk: I see rescue site, yes I can list Guinness there. We're in Glendora, CA. I found a couple of other sites but they were all out of state. What other sites should we check out?

        What else can I do to get her calmer? Any suggestions are helpful.

        ,

      • Franksterk profile image
        Author

        Frankie Kangas 4 years ago from California

        @anonymous: I'm unclear, did you try RescueShelter.com/California ? (http://www.www.rescueshelter.com/california) they are the group that you look by state, then by location in state. You can then check out the listings for rescues, shetlers, etc. If you find one in your area, read the info and IF it says they take FIV cats, call them.

        We are adding the rescues we learn about as we find them. As you are finding out, it is not easy. I'll let you know if I find any others in Southern California. (Is that where Glendora is?)

        I have two things I've tried for calming cats that work:

        1. Dr. Goodpet's Calm Stress

        2. Bach's Rescue Remedy

        They both work well for me. You usually can get them both at a health food store or online.

      • potovanja profile image

        potovanja 4 years ago

        I must say one really BIG THANK YOU to help this beautiful animals. Last year we find more then 150 new, warm home for homeless cat's, which we found from supšermarkets and shops. People are so cruel to leave this beauties on the streets, lonely without anything. Thank you for help animals and for really great lens...

      • Franksterk profile image
        Author

        Frankie Kangas 4 years ago from California

        @potovanja: Thank you for your kind words and for all you do for our feline friends. Bear hugs, Frankie

      • profile image

        anonymous 4 years ago

        I have long-term fostered a beautiful ginger tom who was living rough near where I worked. Although wary of humans at first, within a couple of months and during a very harsh winter, he was literally begging to be inside.

        Thinking back to the day when I took him home 18 months ago, he had clinical symptoms of the final stage of the disease at that time, as he exhibited severe respiratory problems. I kept him confined for a month or so, in order that introductions to the other cats in my multi-cat (and dog) household could be managed easily. After that, I left him free around the house and he proved to be one of the most gentle and affectionate cats I've had.

        About four months ago he started refusing his food, and a trip to the vets showed that he had both gingivitis and was well on his way to renal failure. We had him on ovarid to control the gingivitis and a formula-diet for the kidneys. He's recently back to not eating again, his bladder control is shot and he appears to have chronic acid-reflux. Because he is FIV+ and has renal problems, many of the normal routes to infection control have been closed off.

        It is looking very much like I will finally have to concede that he should be PTS. Its not a decision that is easy to make. How anyone can do that for an FIV+ cat that is otherwise healthy is beyond me. Give FIV+ cats a chance!

      • profile image

        myamya 4 years ago

        Very nice lens, thank you for sharing!

      • Franksterk profile image
        Author

        Frankie Kangas 4 years ago from California

        @anonymous: Thank you for sharing your story. I'm so glad you gave this gentle cat a home. Living outdoors, in the elements with all of the stress shortens most cats lives with no compromised immune system. I'm so glad he had 18 months of love in his life. Thank you for all you did for him and our other feline friends.

      • bushaex profile image

        Stephen Bush 4 years ago from Ohio

        SquidAngel blessings from our seven cats (they like to play a game on my iPad) and were reading your lens over my shoulder. Thank you for your wonderful work in shedding a light on this cat survival issue.

      • Franksterk profile image
        Author

        Frankie Kangas 4 years ago from California

        @bushaex: Thank you for the blessings. Glad to see another person with many cats in their lives. Bear hugs, Frankster

      • Snakesmum profile image

        Jean DAndrea 4 years ago from Victoria, Australia

        Thankyou for all you do for FIV+ cats. My girl Tia is FIV+ but she is fine inside and has an outdoor run so she can have fresh air. She's about 13 now, and I've had her since I found her starving in the street 12 years ago. She's a one person cat, that's for sure, and she loves the most expensive food, of course! :-)

      • Franksterk profile image
        Author

        Frankie Kangas 4 years ago from California

        @Snakesmum: Thanks for sharing your life with your FIV+ cat, Tia. She sounds like some of ours -- nothing is too expensive for them. lol Bear hugs, Frankie

      • Diana Wenzel profile image

        Renaissance Woman 4 years ago from Colorado

        Just had to return to this important web page to renew my blessing and express my gratitude for your compassionate work with FIV felines. Thank you for your educational mission and for all of the love you are actively expressing in all that you do for these precious animals.

      • Franksterk profile image
        Author

        Frankie Kangas 4 years ago from California

        @Diana Wenzel: Thank you. Bear hugs, Frankie

      • makorip lm profile image

        makorip lm 4 years ago

        All our cats came to us either from the street or saved from euthanization by us at the Animal Shelter. Some amazing animals are available out there, you just have to find them.

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        anonymous 4 years ago

        I once heard someone talking about "cats with AIDS." I really knew nothing about FIV cats until my visit here today. Thanks for the education and for what you're doing to help these cats.

      • Elyn MacInnis profile image

        Elyn MacInnis 4 years ago from Shanghai, China

        There is nothing finer than education on the latest scientific studies. Blessings to you in your great work!

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        Stephanie 4 years ago from Canada

        This is such a fantastic cause and I'm so glad you made a lens for it. I'm a huge cat lover and I am always so sad when I think of anything bad happening to them. :( I'm glad soemone out there is trying to help those kitties who need it.

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        anonymous 4 years ago

        Returning with fresh angel dust and congratulations on being honored as More Of Our Favorite Lenses 2012, very well deserved!

      • clouda9 lm profile image

        clouda9 lm 4 years ago

        Crushed to hear your rescue kitties were euthanized when they tested positive for FIV. Thanks for the indepth discussion and links to more info Frankie. Congrats for being one of Squidoo's favorite lenses of 2012! (http://hq.squidoo.com/lensmaster-spotlight/more-of...

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        Frankie Kangas 4 years ago from California

        @clouda9 lm: Thank you for visiting FIV Cat Rescue on Squidoo and for your congrats. I was really surprised but thrilled when I read the write up this morning. I've been so busy taking care of cats, finding homes for cats, and creating educational materials about cats and trying to get grants that I've neglected all of my lenses online except for my 3 FIV lenses. I just got my new computer up and running after my 9-yr old computer bit the dust so I've been out of the loop. I've been so busy taking care of 16 cats and working in FIV Cat Rescue that I've my lenses, except this hone have been pretty neglected. Bear hugs, Frankie

      • clouda9 lm profile image

        clouda9 lm 4 years ago

        @Franksterk: Keep on keeping on Frankie...doing what you do for the FIV Cat Rescue is inspiring and truly incredible!

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        Frankie Kangas 4 years ago from California

        @clouda9 lm: Thank you for the kudos. Bear hugs, Frankie

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        feedwater lm 4 years ago

        Cats are my one true love from the Animal kingdom, our Cat Lola has to put up with us brandishing her with constant attention, it sounds like a cats dream but she can be distant!

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        Loretta Livingstone 4 years ago from Chilterns, UK.

        It's a wonderful job you are doing. If you like I can post a link to this from my cats lens. Quite beside the point, but I also like the copyright notice at the bottom of the page. I hope you don't mind if I borrow that idea.

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        Frankie Kangas 4 years ago from California

        @Loretta L: Love to be added to your cat lens. Make sure to tell me the url or name. Copying this particular copyright notice is not prob. It's pretty generic. Bear hugs, Frankie

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        Terry Lomax 4 years ago from Rep. of Ireland

        Fantastic lens, and a great oasis you are for needy cats, my avatar shows Percy, one of our two cats, in a different light, he looks very like your Princess.

      • Franksterk profile image
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        Frankie Kangas 4 years ago from California

        @catmaxx: Thanks for visiting and for the kudos. Bear hugs, Frankie

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        CristianStan 4 years ago

        I wonder if they have a base in other states, it would be nice to be able to help animals all across the United States

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        Frankie Kangas 4 years ago from California

        @CristianStan: Thank you for your visit. We do help cats all across the United States. Although FIV Cat Rescue is located in Fort Bragg, CA, we are focused on education on a national level and even have worked with folks in Canada and the UK. On our facebook page, facebook.com/fivcatrescue.catsinneed, we focus on finding homes for individual cats and have helped cats all over the US find homes, transportation and even had owners who kept the cats after they were educated about FIV and the MYTHinformation that seems to be everywhere. We have even had some shelters stop killing FIV+ cats and now find homes or rescues to take them. Frankie Kangas, Founder and Executive Director

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        anonymous 3 years ago

        @anonymous: Try GNC calming treats/meds for cats. It is sold at Petsmart, it seems to help mine. And lord knows when you rescue other animals, well my cats don't like it especially Charlie Chaplin.. Goodluck

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        anonymous 3 years ago

        @Franksterk: Hello I posted a year ago, when I rescued a cat that showed up at my house. Originally I was going to neuter him and then give him to my local shelter for adoption. But it turned out that Mister was FIV pos. And the local shelter here would put him down. At the time I posted he was very docile. He still is very sweet, except that the last many months he has been chasing two of my spayed females and I have been seeing bite wounds. I am worried at this point. And am looking for help. I know some of my cats are a one person cat. But because I worry about what to do for him, and I do not want to put my cats in jeopardy, Do you know where I might can find him a super loving home. He is so healthy the shelter that neutered him said, that it was simply a rountine test they do, when they found it. I hate that blue and baby momma do not feel safe here near my back yard, I have noticed that they are now staying in my neighbors. I don't know why MIster has become so honnery, or territorial, or even aggressive towards some of my female cats, but what ever the reason I need help.. I have also rescued around four different litters, and that may be why I am looking at various angles for relief, as I am very overwhelmed. Luckily only four more kittens to go till I get my sanity back..lol

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        Frankie Kangas 3 years ago from California

        @anonymous: I don't know how old Mister is -- obviously at least 1 year old -- nor do you say if he is indoor/outdoor or outdoor only. Since the females are staying at your neighbor's house, I know that he is not indoor only. Some cats, whether they are male or female, especially if they had been abandoned and on their own, become territorial when they finally find a family/home.

        FIV is spread thru deep bite wounds so it is not good to have him biting. FIV is really not a big deal except some shelters will kill a cat that tests positive for FIV antibodies so it places the other cats in danger. Even if they don't get FIV, the bite wounds can become infested causing health problems for those cats.

        You need to keep any aggressive cat -- FIV+ or non-FIV -- separated from other cats and preferably indoors. (It's hard to keep a cat separated from other cats outdoors unless you have an enclosure of some kind.

        To find a home for Mister, go yo my other site, Rescues Taking FIV cats, at www.squidoo.com/rescues-taking-FIV-cats. There you'll find rescues listed by city/state along with other resources.

        Good luck to you. Let me know if you have any other questions. Bear hugs, Frankie

      • Franksterk profile image
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        Frankie Kangas 3 years ago from California

        @anonymous: Thanks Heather. Yes, there are some other calming homeopathic meds to help calm cats too, such as Be Calm and Rescue Remedy, however if a cat is still aggressive you need to keep them separated from the rest.

        BTW I have several cats that are aggressive only when there are more than 1 or 2 other cats. They are fine with the 1 or 2 cats they have been introduced to individually. Introducing cats is an science really. BTW, the best advice I've ever found is in the book Cat Vs. Cat. The author offers advice for most situations.

        Thanks again for your suggestion. Bear hugs, Frankie

      • profile image

        anonymous 3 years ago

        @Franksterk: Thanks Frankie. I wil look into the website and see what I can do. Yes I do alot of volunteer work for animal shelters, and the Fl Gainesvile petsnip operation told me as much about fiv. Back then he was newer and not aggressive over the last wo years though I have seen him change alittle, he is outdoor and indoor, the only problem I have is that apparently I have to big of a heart and not enough space. Wih the new arrivals I am tryig to save it is hard. I have found homes for all of the kittens except four left to go. Before these new kittens I already had ten cats spayed or neutered ect. And yes if I didnt see him with my own eyes go after Blue and baby momma also with a bite wound I would not be worried like I am. I have had Mister for 3 +yrs, and the others longer. He is 7 Now. I have my 3 oiginals and somewhere along the way more strays showed up and it took so much work to gain ther trust That I dont see them beig successful anywhre else. So all of my animas are fixed/ vac..Minus a new stray outside..

      • Franksterk profile image
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        Frankie Kangas 3 years ago from California

        @anonymous: I understand your problem and Mister's too. He is not getting the attention he wants/needs to feel good so his jealousy is, I believe, causing the problem because he sees the other cats as threats to his home/security. He needs the stability that you just can't give him currently.

        I added more rescues yesterday to the site so make sure to check again. Good luck in finding him a home sooner rather than later. And, thank you for all you do for our furry, feline friends. Bear hugs, Frankie

      • profile image

        dreamydrawcats 3 years ago

        Hello,

        I work at a cat hospital in Phoenix, AZ. We're currently trying to find homes for 4 very wonderful cats, one of whom tested positive for FIV. Could you possibly point us toward any local organizations or sanctuaries that may be willing to help us find him a home?

      • Franksterk profile image
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        Frankie Kangas 3 years ago from California

        @dreamydrawcats: You can check out our website on Rescues Taking FIV Cats. It's at squidoo.com/rescues-taking-fiv-cats It lists rescues by city and state and gives other ideas and information for finding homes. Good luck and thank you for all you do for our furry, feline friends. Bear hugs, Frankie

      • profile image

        Rosend 9 months ago

        I rescued a neutered, chipped male from shelter in Juneau Alaska 7 years ago, named him Bubba. He loves to wonder and I'm confident at some time he was feral as it was nearly 2 years before he became comfortable with my husband and myself to approach us or allow affection and still is jumpy on approach and hidden when strangers arrive. In Juneau he had outside access during daylight and always returned for feeding and bed at night. We have moved to rural property in Oregon and installed a cat door. Bubba now spends more time outdoors and does scrap with the traveling ferals. He is constantly coming in with small scabs and this year we are now treating his 3rd abscess, which regardless of home treatment require tube insertion and antibiotic. While discussing his propensity for repeated abscesses yesterday, we decided blood test were in order. I received a call from her with results he is positive for FIV and she ask if I still wanted to provide the drainage insertion, a question I thought extremely odd until I began internet research! Thank goodness I found your site, for a short time felt like a criminal for harboring a killer! Regardless, I will not give up Bubba for anything and will provide him with proper care, physically and mentally for as long as he lives. Considering our active outside lifestyle including open windows and doors and his love for the outdoors, how can we possible trap him in a secluded room! I do restrain him indoors following the drain insertions, the howling, pleading and escape escapades is relentless and after a few days he gets lethargic and depressed and his coat looks dull. Also, the cat box issue weighs heavy as the 16 pounder does not require a regular box normally, and when forced inside will go days without relieving himself. I'm sure you know where this is headed! At what point is quality of life over shortened life a priority. I also question he if shelters routinely test for FIV or give the FIV vaccine to strays that they neuter? Also, I wonder if FIV is responsible for his increased abscesses? Also, my neighbor has cats, loves Bubba and has never seen him show aggression. She has cared for him while we're on vacation, is a devoted animal lover, especially fond of rescues and dabbles in animal communication skills. She insist that Bubba is not aggressive and suggest we try to confine him at night and let out during the day. I'm seriously considering this. Should I choose this option, for my cats mental health, will I be shunned by local vets and cat protectors if by chance the experiment fails and I have take him in with another abscess?

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