ArtsAutosBooksBusinessEducationEntertainmentFamilyFashionFoodGamesGenderHealthHolidaysHomeHubPagesPersonal FinancePetsPoliticsReligionSportsTechnologyTravel

George Harrison - Love One Another

Updated on August 12, 2011

Love One Another - A Tribute to George Harrison

George Harrison is a great inspiration in our lives. A great man with a great sense and deep spiritual understanding.

George Harrison died in Los Angeles at 1:30 p.m. (2130 GMT) on Thursday, November 29 2009.

His family issued a statement saying: "He left this world as he lived in it, conscious of God, fearless of death, and at peace, surrounded by family and friends. He often said, 'Everything else can wait but the search for God cannot wait, and love one another."'

Awaiting On You All

Lyrics by George Harrison

You don't need no love in

You don't need no bed pan

You don't need a horoscope or a microscope

The see the mess that you're in

If you open up your heart

You will know what I mean

We've been polluted so long

Now here's a way for you to get clean

By chanting the names of the lord and you'll be free

The lord is awaiting on you all to awaken and see

Chanting the names of the lord and you'll be free

The lord is awaiting on you all to awaken and see

You don't need no passport

And you don't need no visas

You don't need to designate or to emigrate

Before you can see Jesus

If you open up your heart

You'll see he's right there

Always was and will be

He'll relieve you of your cares

By chanting the names of the lord and you'll be free

The lord is awaiting on you all to awaken and see

Chanting the names of the lord and you'll be free

The lord is awaiting on you all to awaken and see

You don't need no church house

And you don't need no Temple

You don't need no rosary beads or them books to read

To see that you have fallen

If you open up your heart

You will know what I mean

We've been kept down so long

Someone's thinking that we're all green

And while the Pope owns 51% of General Motors

And the stock exchange is the only thing he's qualified to quote us

The lord is awaiting on you all to awaken and see

By chanting the names of the lord and you'll be free

All Things Must Pass

All Things Must Pass
All Things Must Pass

"All Things Must Pass" was George Harrison's first real solo album ( the previous only contained instrumentals). Most of the songs were written while the Beatles were still existing, and George was writing so many great songs during the final years of the 1960's that, when the Beales finally folded in early 1970, he had songs enough for a double album. Eventually it turned out to be a triple album, with the 3rd record containing "jams" with George and his good friends, such as Eric Clapton, Dave Mason, Carl Radle and Jim Gordon.

Like most Harrison fans I regard "ATMP" as George finest album. Many of his greatest songs come from this LP. Though there is a great variety of styles and moods on the album, particularly the ballads stand out. Songs like "Isn't It a Pity", "Run of the Mill", "Behind That Locked Door", "Beware of Darkness" and "I'd Have You Anytime" are simply moving. His version of Dylan's "If Not For You" beats Dylan's own version by miles. Among the other up-beat number I especially like "What is Life". The bonus-track "I Live For You" is gem; incredible that this song was not originally included.

A lot of the acoustic guitars are played by Badfinger's Pete Ham and Tom Evans, who were two young very talented song-writers themselves and who had already witten the classic "Without You" at this time. For Pete Ham, who wrote Badfinger' greatest hit-records, Harrison may have been the biggest inspiration among the Beatles. There are many similarities among these two great musicians' songwriting and musical arrangements. Try listen to Badfinger's "Straight Up" album, which was partly produced by George.

This 2 CD set is must have for any Beatles or Badfinger fan!

By Morten Vindberg

 

George Harrison:

"For every human is a quest to find the answer to, why are we here? Who am I? Where did I come from? Where am I going? That to me became the only important thing in my life. Everything else is secondary. So for me there is no alternative."

Experience George Harrison - The Best of George Harrison

The Best of George Harrison
The Best of George Harrison

As the Beatles' perpetual dark horse, Harrison rarely got the chance to write and sing more than one or two songs per album. But once the band split up, the former "quiet one" was quick out of the gate with a series of memorable hit singles that seamlessly merged his budding spirituality and an epic, Phil Spector-inspired pop sensibility. This collection, originally released in 1976, combines seven of Harrison's best-known Beatles numbers, including "Something," "If I Needed Someone," "Here Comes the Sun," and "While My Guitar Gently Weeps" with a half-dozen early solo hits including "My Sweet Lord," "Give Me Love (Give Me Peace On Earth)," "You," and "What Is Life." As such, it's a good entry-level Harrison primer. --Scott Schinder

 
The Concert For Bangladesh [2 CD]
The Concert For Bangladesh [2 CD]

Ravi Shankar planted the seed, but it was George Harrison who turned this historic benefit concert into reality. The publicity-shy former Beatle could've easily written a check and forgotten all about the matter--impoverished East Pakistani refugees stranded in India--but instead recruited some of his most talented and compassionate friends and created an event remembered as much for the quality of its music as the purity of its intent. (The two-part engagement itself raised $250,000.) The players include Eric Clapton, Ringo Starr, Billy Preston, Leon Russell, and Bob Dylan, while the backing band includes Jim Keltner, Klaus Voormann, and the up-and-coming Apple band Badfinger (Phil Spector and Harrison produced). The concert took place on August 1, 1971 at Madison Square Garden and was released as a triple-album boxed set that December and a feature film in 1972. That year, it won the Grammy for best album. The program begins with Shankar and his trio ("Bangla Dhun") and ends with a song Harrison wrote for the occasion ("Bangla Desh"). Highlights include Billy Preston's rousing "That's the Way God Planned It" and Dylan's heartfelt five-song set, starting with "A Hard Rain's A-Gonna Fall." The remaster adds an additional Dylan track, "Love Minus Zero/No Limit," from the afternoon show. Although the cover art has been changed to a picture of Harrison, the original iconic image of a sad-eyed child remains prominent in the CD and DVD packaging. As with previous versions of The Concert for Bangladesh, all artist royalties go to UNICEF or, as Harrison notes in his band introduction, "Nobody's gettin' paid for anything." --Kathleen C. Fennessy

 
Let It Roll: Songs by George Harrison
Let It Roll: Songs by George Harrison

George Harrison’s first-ever career-spanning solo hits collection, Let It Roll: Songs by George Harrison. Special packaging includes a 28-page booklet featuring previously unseen and rare photos, and newly-written liner notes by Warren Zanes. The collection’s 19 tracks have been digitally remastered by Giles Martin at EMI’s Abbey Road Studios. “Let It Roll: Songs by George Harrison is a gathering of material that takes us far into the territory that was ultimately a place unique to George Harrison,” writes Warren Zanes in his liner notes essay for the new collection.

This collection is the first to span Harrison’s entire solo recording career, including the #1 Billboard Pop singles “My Sweet Lord,” “Isn’t It A Pity,” “Give Me Love (Give Me Peace On Earth),” and “Got My Mind Set On You." Let It Roll also features live recordings of three timeless Harrison-penned Beatles songs, “Something,” “While My Guitar Gently Weeps,” and “Here Comes The Sun,” from his 1971 all-star Concert For Bangladesh benefit at Madison Square Garden.

“The keyhole into the world of George Harrison is the music itself. Yet his songs and the accomplishments for which he’s remembered are inextricably bound—and those accomplishments are, without question, eclectic in scope,” Zanes writes.

George Harrison is a twice-inducted member of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, as a solo artist and as a member of The Beatles, and an 11-time Grammy Award winner for his recordings with The Beatles, Traveling Wilburys, and as a solo artist.

 
Living In The Material World
Living In The Material World

To say that George Harrison's post-Beatles career peaked early is an understatement. Long frustrated by the dominance of the Lennon-McCartney songwriting juggernaut, Harrison's pent-up creative juices (and a wealth of unrecorded songs penned during the Fabs' final years) infused his 1970 epic multidisc All Things Must Pass with a grandeur that rivaled his former band's best. Three years passed before this distinctly more humble studio follow-up was released (with 1971's live Concert for Bangladesh sandwiched in between) to tepid reviews and some fan grumbling. But as Harrison hinted in his 2000 notes to the reissued All Things (which curiously complained about Phil Spector's typically bigger-than-life production), Material World may well represent Harrison's artistic vision in its purest form: an often perplexingly ironic stew of spiritualism ("Living in the Material World," the more accessible single "Give Me Love," and others) and misanthropy (especially regarding his ex-band and their lawyers on the "Sue Me, Sue You Blues"). Despite the presence of many of All Things' core session men (Ringo Starr, Jim Keltner, Nicky Hopkins, Kalus Voorman), Harrison's self-production is low-key funky and more organic than its predecessor, even as he tellingly tends to shortchange his own voice in the bargain. Rife with subtle country and folk touches, there are some warm surprises here (the quietly introspective "Be Here Now," the pop smarts of "Don't Let Me Wait Too Long" and "The Lord Loves the One," with "Try Some, Buy Some" briefly revisiting Phil Spector and his wall of sound), even if it's an album that largely suffers from the curse of expectations. --Jerry McCulley

Product Description

#1 album originally released in 1973 that contains the #1 Pop single "Give Me Love". Now remastered and repackaged with two bonus tracks.

 
Here Comes the Sun: The Spiritual and Musical Journey of George Harrison
Here Comes the Sun: The Spiritual and Musical Journey of George Harrison

A friend of George Harrison offers informed reflections on the late musician's spiritual quest.

Out of the insanity, claustrophobia and estrangement that came with being a member of the Beatles, Harrison emerged an affected man, in search of God and peace. Filmmaker/biographer Greene (Justice at Dachau, 2003, etc.) portrays his friend as introspective and modest, inspired by an experience with LSD ("From that moment on, I wanted to have that depth and clarity of perception," Harrison told Rolling Stone.) Harrison reached beyond intoxicants into the bliss of yoga and cosmic chants, a buzz that took him "into the astral plane." He wanted others to share his contact with the mystical and spoke of his spirituality during concerts, where his comments were met with, at best, indifference. Though he spent considerable time exploring the Hindu religion, writes Greene, the musician was a restless quester, always looking for ways to put his spiritual house in order. Greene writes of a newfound "levelheaded dispassion" as Harrison moved into his sixth decade, a sense of liberation from the material world coupled with an affirmation of nature and a personal recognition of his place in the scheme of things.

Greene presents a man deeply engaged in the world he longed to transcend. (Kirkus Review, November 1, 2005)

 

George Harrison Photo Gallery

Click thumbnail to view full-size

George Harrison Chanting Hare Krishna

George Harrison Chanting Hare Krishna
George Harrison Chanting Hare Krishna

George Harrison My Sweet Lord - Great...Live!

George Harrison Videos

Sir Paul McCartney:

He was a lovely guy and a very brave man and had a wonderful sense of humor.

George Harrison's sitar-lesson with Ravi Shankar

George Harrison and his beloved spiritual master HIs Divine Grace A.C. Bhaktiveganta Swami Prabhupada - George Harrison met Srila Prabhupada in the late 1960s.

George: And if I didn't get feedback from Prabhupada on my songs about Krishna or the philosophy, I'd get it from the devotees. That's all the encouragement I needed really. It just seemed that anything spiritual I did, either through songs, or helping with publishing the books, or whatever, really pleased him. The song I wrote, "Living in the Material World," as I wrote in I, Me, Mine, was influenced by Shrila Prabhupada. He's the one who explained to me how we're not these physical bodies. We just happen to be in them.

Like I said in the song, this place's not really what's happening. We don't belong here, but in the spiritual sky:

As l'm fated for the material world

Get frustrated in the material world

Senses never gratified

Only swelling like a tide

That could drown me in the material world

The whole point to being here, really, is to figure a way to get out.

That was the thing about Prabhupada, you see. He didn't just talk about loving Krishna and getting out of this place, but he was the perfect example. He talked about always chanting, and he was always chanting. I think that that in itself was perhaps the most encouraging thing for me. It was enough to make me try harder, to be just a little bit better. He was a perfect example of everything he preached.

"Here comes the Sun" - Live on 1972! George Harrison, John Lennon, Paul McCartney, Ringo Starr

"Here comes the Sun", the song George Harrison wrote after meeting his spiritual teacher Srila Prabhupada in 1969, which he dedicated to Prabhupada expressing his impression of this Personality.

George Harrison Quotes - Famous Spiritual Quotes by Geaorge Harrison

* Krishna is God, the source of all that exists, the cause of all that is, was, or ever will be.

* Through all ages, great saints have remained as living proof that this non-temporary, permanent state of God consciousness can be revived in all living souls.

* If there's a God, I want to see Him. It's pointless to believe in something without proof.

* Consciousness and meditation are methods where you can actually obtain GOD perception.

* You can actually see God, and Hear Him, play with Him. It might sound crazy, but He is actually there.

* All religions are branches of one big tree. It doesn't matter what you call Him just as long as you call.

* So it's really a process of actually having a realization of God, which all becomes clear with the expanded state of consciousness that develops when you chant.

Quick Vote

Which was George Harrison's best song?

See results

George brought magic to the lives of those who knew him. - Yoko Ono's tribute to George Harrison

"George has given so much to us in his lifetime and continues to do so even after his passing, with his music, his wit and his wisdom," she told The Press Association.

"His life was magical and we all felt we had shared a little bit of it by knowing him."

George Harrison

"Everything else can wait but the search for God cannot wait, and love one another."

Something to say about George? - Your thoughts and comments are welcome, please share.

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment

    • profile image

      PhillipConte 5 years ago

      George Harrison was a very talented man and underappreciated in his time. A very good lens

    • KimGiancaterino profile image

      KimGiancaterino 6 years ago

      My favorite Beatle. He left the world far too soon.

    • SusannaDuffy profile image

      Susanna Duffy 7 years ago from Melbourne Australia

      Beautiful! Blessed by an angel today