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Green Products

Updated on August 22, 2014
TheGutterMonkey profile image

Nerd, cinephile, TV-junky, research-loving, left-leaning, science-fiending, atheist from the gutter. Follow me on Twitter @TheGutterMonkey.

Saving Money and The Environment

The green movement has been growing larger and larger with each passing year as more and more people have been realizing that saving the planet can also save you money.

Making a few "green" investments in only a handful of areas can save you thousands of dollars in the long run. From solar chargers, to solar panels, to electric cars, and even electric cigarettes, living environmentally with green products can save both your life, your cash, and your planet.

Solar panels can power everything in your home. They can provide all of the electricity for your lights, computer, appliances, television, and pool. This will help you save hundreds of dollars of month on your electric bill. You can also incorporate a solar thermal energy system to heat your hot water and it can be used to heat your pool or hot tub. These systems can cost between three and five thousand dollars and could save you an additional two to three hundred dollars a month on your electric bill.

The initial investment for solar panels is well worth the money. You will see a return in your investment within two years. After the two years the money you save on your electric bill will be money in your pocket. You will also have the peace of mind knowing that you are doing your part to help converse the Earth.

How does solar power work at night?

The fact that solar panels can only gather sunlight during the day is often touted as a major drawback to solar power. However, it is possible to draw the power off into a battery source for later use. In fact, this is the way outdoor solar lights work-- they draw energy during the day to power nighttime illumination. When the sun is down at night, your batteries will kick on to provide electricity to your household until the sun rises the next morning and its energy becomes available again.

With the right size battery array to charge during the day, your solar energy system will work around the clock, even at night.

This solar powered bag is reinforced and padded to carry and protect a laptop. The solar charger has large zipped pockets for documents, and multiple small pockets for electronic devices. Ideal for use in town or as a travel bag.

Charges cell phones, sat phones, PDAs, GPS, iPods, cameras and most other handheld electronics.

(When not in the sun, the battery can be charged using the AC travel charger or DC car charger.)

They were quiet and fast, produced no exhaust and ran without gasoline. Ten years later, these futuristic cars were almost entirely gone. What happened? Why should we be haunted by the ghost of the electric car?

Low-energy light bulbs are a guaranteed way to save money and help the environment. The fluorescent bulbs reduce your monthly energy bills and their long-life prevents multiple trips to the light bulb store. Replacing one light bulb with a compact fluorescent or LED bulb can save almost $50 over its lifetime.

Director Davis Guggenheim eloquently weaves the science of global warming with Al Gore's personal history and lifelong commitment to reversing the effects of global climate change in the most talked-about documentary of the year. An audience and critical favorite, An Inconvenient Truth makes the compelling case that global warming is real, man-made, and its effects will be cataclysmic if we don't act now. Gore presents a wide array of facts and information in a thoughtful and compelling way: often humorous, frequently emotional, always fascinating. In the end, An Inconvenient Truth accomplishes what all great films should: it leaves the viewer shaken, involved and inspired.

Americans use 2 billion disposable batteries every year. Nickel cadmium cells contain cadmium and alkaline cells contain mercury. Though batteries can be recycled, not every community offers the service. Recharging batteries maximizes the life of the battery, reduces waste, and helps you save money.

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    • aesta1 profile image

      Mary Norton 4 years ago from Ontario, Canada

      I wish I can do more buy ease is often the big temptation.

    • TolovajWordsmith profile image

      Tolovaj Publishing House 4 years ago from Ljubljana

      The future is green!

    • Gypzeerose profile image

      Rose Jones 5 years ago

      Pinned to my board: Nature and Loving the Earth.

    • orange3 lm profile image

      orange3 lm 5 years ago

      Great lens on a very important subject. We have saved a lot of money going green and will continue to try to find new green ways to save even more :)

    • jballs6 profile image

      jballs6 5 years ago

      We are considering investing in solar panels. Large outlay but it will be worth the ongoing rewards and benefits

    • RetroMom profile image

      RetroMom 5 years ago

      Great lens. More and more people are using electronic cigarette.

    • profile image

      anonymous 6 years ago

      Nice lens

    • TheGutterMonkey profile image
      Author

      The Gutter Monkey 6 years ago

      @Sylvestermouse: Yes, they most certainly are. I smoke them myself and since the smoke isn't really smoke (it's water vapor) you're allowed to smoke them literally everywhere. They're really one of the greatest new products I've ever heard of and will probably end up saving a lot of lives.

      I've written more about them in my www.squidoo.com/ecig page. I don't know if you're a smoker or not, but they're really worth the investment if you are.

    • Sylvestermouse profile image

      Cynthia Sylvestermouse 6 years ago from United States

      Great suggestions! I had never heard of an electronic cigarette. I wonder if they would be a possible alternative for people who still want to smoke in public.