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HERMANN GORING | WW1 Ace

Updated on March 3, 2014

Germany's Aces of World War I

During the first year of World War I, Göring served with an infantry regiment in the Vosges region. He was hospitalized with rheumatism resulting from the damp of trench warfare. While he was recovering, his friend Bruno Loerzer convinced him to transfer to the Luftstreitkräfte ("air combat force") of the German army. Göring's transfer request was turned down. But later that year Göring flew as Loerzer's observer in Feldfliegerabteilung 25, FFA 25. Göring had informally transferred himself. He was detected and sentenced to three weeks' confinement to barracks. The sentence was never carried out: by the time it was imposed Göring's association with Loerzer had been recognized. They were assigned as a team to FFA 25 in the Crown Prince's Fifth Army - "though it seems that they had to steal a plane in order to qualify." They flew reconnaissance and bombing missions for which the Crown Prince invested both Göring and Loerzer with the Iron Cross, first class.

Hermann Goring - Aces of World War I

On completing his pilot's training course he was posted back to FFA 2 in October 1915. Göring had already claimed two air victories as an Observer (one unconfirmed). He gained another flying a Fokker E.III single-seater scout in March 1916. In October 1916 he was posted to Jagdstaffel 5, but was wounded in action in November. In February 1917 he joined Jagdstaffel 26. He now scored steadily until in May 1917 he got his first command, Jasta 27. Serving with Jastas 5, 26 and 27, he claimed 21 air victories. Besides the Iron Cross, he was awarded the Zaehring Lion with swords, the Karl Friedrich Order and the House Order of Hohenzollern with swords, third class, and finally in May 1918, the coveted Pour le Mérite, also known as the Blue Max. On 7 July 1918, after the death of Wilhelm Reinhard, the successor of The Red Baron, he was made commander of the famed "Flying Circus", Jagdgeschwader 1.

HERMAN GORING FIGHTER ACE

For more than 70 years in many books and movies, Hermann Goring was defined by his excess and crimes against humanity during the Third Reich and the Second World War. But his career as a young military officer in World War I have been overlooked until now. Hermann Goring Fighter Ace is the first in-depth look at Goring's role as a military flyer and air combat leader from 1914 through the end of The Great War, and how those experiences shaped the personality that came to the world's attention in 1939.

Peter Kilduff has produced a landmark volume based on extensive research into Goring's early military records and thousands of German and Allied documents to put the neophyte airman's life and events into perspective. Among other resources, Kilduff drew on Goring's own combat reports and related writings. Illustrated with over eighty drawings and photographs, including many from Goring's private collection and never

before published, Herman Goring - Fighter Ace is a tour de force of historical material covering the early combat career of one of the Twentieth Century's most infamous military figures.

World War I Ace with 22 Confirmed Kills

In June 1917, after a lengthy dogfight, Göring shot down Australian pilot Frank Slee. The battle is recounted in The Rise and Fall of Hermann Goering. Göring landed and met the Australian, and presented Slee with his Iron Cross. Years after, Slee gave Göring's Iron Cross to a friend, who later died on the beach during the Normandy Landings. Also during the war Göring had through his generous treatment made a friend of his prisoner of war Captain Frank Beaumont, a Royal Flying Corps pilot. "It was part of Goering's creed to admire a good enemy, and he did his best to keep Captain Beaumont from being taken over by the Army."

Göring finished the war with twenty-two confirmed kills.

Fokker DR.1 Triplane

The Fokker Dr.1 Triplane, one of the aircraft that most of the German Aces used during the Great War. Equipped with the 110 hp Oberurel rotary engine and twin Spandau machine guns that could be fired independently, this airplane had an excellent rate of climb and could match the Camel for maneuverability.

Pfalz Aircraft of WWI:

A Centennial Perspective

on Great War Airplanes (Volume 5)

This is the newest book from World War One Author Jack Herris. Illustrations by Bob Pearson and Martin Digmayer, cover art by Aaron Weaver and cover design by Steve Anderson. This new book covers the development of Pfalz aircraft that most of the German Aces of World War One flew. The new book contains 530 photographs, 28 in full color, 81 color profiles, 10 color illustrations, serial number of aircraft. Also aircraft dimensions and performance specs. 1/72 and 1/48 scale drawings are included of 15 Pfalz aircraft types.

WERNER VOSS | Rival of the Red Baron
Werner Voss (April 13, 1897-September 23, 1917) was a World War I German fighter pilot and ace. Born in Krefeld, the first son of an industrial dyer, Voss wa...

MAX IMMELMANN | World War One Ace
Max Immelmann was the first pilot to be awarded the Pour le Mérite, Germany's highest military honour. The medal became colloquially known as the "Blue...

GEORGES GUYNEMER | WW1 Ace
Georges Guynemer (December 24, 1894 - September 11, 1917) was a top French fighter ace during World War I and a national hero at the time of his death. Upon ...

ERNST UDET | WW1 Ace | Germany's Second Highest Scoring Fighter Pilot
Ernst Udet (April 26 1896 - November 17 1941) was the second-highest scoring German flying ace of World War I. He was one of the youngest aces and was the hi...

BILLY BISHOP | WW1 Ace
Air Marshal William Avery "Billy" Bishop VC, CB, DSO & Bar, MC, DFC, ED (8 February 1894 - 11 September 1956) was a Canadian First World War fl...

JOSEF JACOBS | WW1 Ace
Josef Jacobs was the 8th highest ace with 48 victories. Lieutenant Josef Karl Peter Jacobs (1894-1978) was one of Germany's leading air aces of the First Wor...

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What Do You Think of Hermann Goring? - World War I Ace, not the Nazi

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    • roby01 profile image

      roby01 4 years ago

      Compliments for the lens by an aviation enthusiast.

    • Michey LM profile image

      Michey LM 5 years ago

      I think that he was a great German Officer but also a great human being, the story with Beaumont is touching.

      Thanks

    • Paperquest5 profile image
      Author

      Paperquest5 5 years ago

      @John Dyhouse: artyfax, thanks for stopping by. I love history and World War One is one of my favorite eras.

    • John Dyhouse profile image

      John Dyhouse 5 years ago from UK

      An interesting story, real life can be so much better to read than dry history. I have learnt something today - thanks