ArtsAutosBooksBusinessEducationEntertainmentFamilyFashionFoodGamesGenderHealthHolidaysHomeHubPagesPersonal FinancePetsPoliticsReligionSportsTechnologyTravel

Kids Recycle Projects

Updated on October 7, 2014

Teaching Kids About Recycling

We all know by now how important recycling is, so teaching kids about recycling at a young age can help them become lifelong recyclers. When you start when kids are young with just about anything, the better your chances of success.

Whether your motives are to teach your children about appreciating and caring for Mother Earth or you just want help sorting the recyclables, here are a few ideas to get you started teaching kids about recycling.

When kids finish that box of cereal or Pop-tarts, with a little practice they can help you recycle your garbage.

Photo Credit: Peggy Hazelwood

Reuse Cloth Shopping Bags
Reuse Cloth Shopping Bags

Facts About Recycling

Reduce, Reuse, Recycle for Kids

The National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences offers great information on reducing, reusing, and recycling for kids. Share these facts about recycling with your children to help them understand the fundamentals of recycling.

Reduce

Reduce means to use fewer things that might end up in the landfill. This can include the following:

~ buy food and other goods in bulk rather than in single-serve containers

~ plant a garden so there is virtually no packaging involved at all

~ take your own reusable cloth bags to the store instead of using the store's plastic or paper bags to carry home groceries

Reuse

Reuse is just what it says: you use an item more than once. Examples of reusing follow:

~ refill water bottles many times with your own filtered water instead of buying a new bottle of water each time

~ use cloth napkins instead of paper napkins

~ repair clothes, toys, bikes, and other household items rather than buying a brand new one

~ buy items second hand at yard sales or thrift stores

Recycle

Recycling is the process of making something new from a discarded item. Do your part with recycling in these ways:

~ throw unwanted phone books in a recycling can or dumpster instead of the garbage can

~ find where you can recycle appliances to keep them out of landfills (some utility companies will even pay you to recycle certain appliances)

~ take aluminum cans to a kiosk in a parking lot or other recycling center to get money for them

~ find out exactly what items your local trash/recycling company accepts

Information Source: NIEHS Kids' Page

Photo Credit: Peggy Hazelwood

What is it? Click the link to see!
What is it? Click the link to see!

Recycle Trash -- Make Fire Starters!

Get crafty and clever!

I blog about lint. I know, it's dumb, but I kind of love lint. It's soft and fuzzy and just nice!

So, here's a quick and dirty recycle project for you and the kids. In case you can't tell from the photo, this quick project helps you recycle both lint and paper rolls. Toilet paper or paper towel rolls work great!

Photo Credit: Peggy Hazelwood

Recycle Games -- What Do Those Symbols Mean? - Get the Kids Involved with Recycling

This cardboard box is another example of a product that is sold in a recycled container. Recycled paper was used to make the box and it can be recycled again.
This cardboard box is another example of a product that is sold in a recycled container. Recycled paper was used to make the box and it can be recycled again. | Source
When you must buy bottled water, buy plastic bottles with a place for kids to write their name. Or add your own label where they can write their name. They can reuse the bottle easily this way. Make a game of kids finding their own water bottle.
When you must buy bottled water, buy plastic bottles with a place for kids to write their name. Or add your own label where they can write their name. They can reuse the bottle easily this way. Make a game of kids finding their own water bottle. | Source
This glass recycles symbol reminds us that like plastic and paper, glass can be recycled. Ask kids to make a list of all the ways your family can reuse glass jars. Some ideas include storing small game pieces or toys, showing off buttons, etc.
This glass recycles symbol reminds us that like plastic and paper, glass can be recycled. Ask kids to make a list of all the ways your family can reuse glass jars. Some ideas include storing small game pieces or toys, showing off buttons, etc. | Source

Teach Kids About Recycling

Hands-on toys really make an impact. These toys and books can help children understand recycling in a real world way.

Does Your Family Recycle?

I LOVE recycling.
I LOVE recycling.

What does your family's recycling plan look like?

See results
Bottlecap Miranda
Bottlecap Miranda

A Recycled Craft

Check Out the Clever Use of Bottlecaps on This Recycled Beauty

I found this lovely beauty at the local Goodwill thrift store last summer. I just love her.

She is made with a few pieces of wood, a couple of plastic bowls, wire, some random hardware, and lots of bottlecaps. This might be an ambitious kids recycle project but isn't she great!? Maybe a smaller version could be made somehow, like just using bottlecaps for dangling legs and arms for instance on a block of painted wood.

Photo Credit: Peggy Hazelwood

Make Postcards

Let each child choose a cereal box (or other box)

and make handmade postcards.

Let them cut out the right size then write

the address and a short note on the back.

Check my article, How to Make Your Own Postcards,

then write on your postcard, add a stamp,

and walk to the post office to mail it.

Recycled sailboat courtesy of Martha Stewart.
Recycled sailboat courtesy of Martha Stewart.

Recycled Sailboat

from Martha Stewart

Just in time for summer, this recycled project would be perfect for backyard fun. Make a sailboat or two with your child using just a few things you'd more than likely throw away. Then set them loose with a tub of water* to watch their sailboat sail.

For this easy project, you'll need (1 for each sailboat):

- coffee can lid

- drinking straw

- paper

- playdough

Visit Martha Stewart's Web site for the complete instructions to make this recycled project. She also has many other projects using recycled material.

*Be sure to watch children around water.

Think about what you throw away.

Can you do without it in the future?

Can you reuse it instead of tossing it in the trash?

Can you recycle it?

Recycled Craft Projects -- Toilet Paper Roll Binoculars
Recycled Craft Projects -- Toilet Paper Roll Binoculars | Source

Recycling Activities for Kids -- Make Binoculars from Toilet Paper Rolls

A Fun Recycling Craft to Do with the Kids

Recycle those toilet paper rolls and paper towel tubes instead of tossing them in the trash or the recycling bin. This fun kids recycle project uses minimal craft supplies and is fast to make. Get creative and you won't have to buy anything to make some super spy binoculars for the whole neighborhood.

Start with these supplies:

- 2 toilet paper rolls or a long paper towel tube cut in half for each pair of binoculars

- Options for the base color of the binoculars:

* 1 color of felt

* Fabric like old blue jeans or a favorite old shirt

* Newsprint or other recycled paper

- Options to make the binoculars camouflage

* 2 more colors of felt cut into random camo shapes

* Contrasting fabric cut into random camo shapes

* Solid colored paper like a brown paper bag cut into random camo shapes

- 2 twist ties to join the tubes

- Cord or shoelace, optional, to make a neck cord (you may want to leave this off of young kids' binoculars for safety)

There are couple of ways to make these binoculars.

1. Start by poking 2 holes in each recycled tube. Use an ice pick or other sharp object and poke a hole about 1/2 inch from the edge on both ends of each roll or tube. These holes will be used to join the tubes together so line them up. Each tube will have 2 holes that will line up at the inside middle and twist ties will be inserted through the holes to join the tubes to create binoculars.

2. If you want to include a neck cord (recommended only for older kids who can be trusted to not wrap the cord around their necks or anyone else's neck), poke 1 more hole in each tube. This time, the holes need to be on the outside edge of the binoculars. Poke the neck cord hole across from 1 of the existing holes (again, about 1/2 inch from the edge). But just 1 hole per tube please.

If you forget to poke the holes at this point, no worries. You can do it later but it's easier to poke the holes now than when the felt, fabric, or paper layer is added to the tube. It can be done though.

3. Cut out the base piece of felt, fabric, or paper and glue it to the toilet paper roll. Use white glue like Elmer's or Mod Podge decoupage medium. Cut the random camouflage shapes and staple them to the covered roll.

You also can sew the random camo shapes to the base piece then glue the base piece of felt or fabric or paper to the roll. I recommend sewing (or using glue if you're using paper as the base) the random pieces on. Older kids who can use a needle and thread can handle this simple task. Show them how to start under the fabric and pull the needle through to the top to use decorative top stitching to sew the pieces on. Then glue the decorated base to the tube.

Use clothespin or binder clip at the edges where the base fabric meets to hold the edges down while the glue dries. Give it 10 or 15 minutes to dry if possible.

4. Join the 2 tubes using the twist ties. Poke a hole through the base material for all 4 or 6 holes you made earlier (4 holes for joining the 2 tubes and 2 holes for the optional neck cord). Line up the tubes so the 4 holes meet in the middle inside of the tubes. Thread a twist tie through 1 hole on each tube so the tubes are snug against each other, and twist the ties together. Tuck the twist tie inside the roll out of the way.

5. Add the cord. Slip a shoelace or other cord or heavy string through the outer 2 holes for the neck cord. Make sure it's long enough for kids to take the binoculars on and off easily. Leave off the cord for young kids to be safe.

NOTE: These supplies are suggestions. Use whatever you have on hand. Remember, you're recycling and teaching kids about recycling so use what you have, including your imagination.

Photo Credit: Peggy Hazelwood

Ways to Entertain and Teach Kids About Recycling - Put in a DVD That Teaches Facts About Recycling

Make Your Own Shrinky Dinks

Yes, that's right. Save those plastic containers with the number 5 or 6 on them.

You can use the plastic to make your own Shrinky Dinks!

Photos of Recycling Projects Listed Below - Click on the picture to see which craft it goes with

Make Recycled Tin Can Luminaries
Make Recycled Tin Can Luminaries | Source
Another Set of Toilet Paper Roll Binoculars
Another Set of Toilet Paper Roll Binoculars | Source
Found objects using a washer, an old tin lid, and a rusty bottle cap with paper decoupaged on, held together with fishing line.
Found objects using a washer, an old tin lid, and a rusty bottle cap with paper decoupaged on, held together with fishing line. | Source

Recycling Tips -- Projects You Can Do With Your Children - Or save these ideas for yourself!

A hot summer day is perfect for kids recycle projects. Do a little planning so you have all the supplies on hand then spend an afternoon under the ceiling fan doing a recycled craft.

Do you use Earth911.com? It's a great Web site.

Here are just a few things you can find at Earth911:

the nearest recycling center,

how to recycle old board games,

and a video on how a recycling center works.

Just about everything you need to make potholders from old socks.
Just about everything you need to make potholders from old socks.

How to Make Potholder Loops

A recycled SOCK craft!

I recently wrote this Squidoo lens when I spotted an old pair of socks in my sewing box:

How to Make Potholder Loops

You've got one of those little metal potholder looms, and now you need to know how to make potholder loops. After all, the point of this fun craft is to make a great, useful product for next to nothing. Make sure the socks or other clothes you're using have a little stretch to them so they start out a bit smaller than the loom so you can stretch them onto the loom pegs.

Photo Credit: Peggy Hazelwood

More Recycling Activities for Kids

These books offer even more fun recycling projects so you'll never run out of fun things to do with your trash!

More Recycled Crafting Articles

Junk Mail Crafts
We all get some fairly often. Maybe not every day but at least several times a week. What is it? JUNK MAIL! I already recycle most of my junk mail.

Rock Painting -- How to Paint Rocks
I saw an article online about rock painting and decided that I had to try that! I don't consider myself to be artistic at all, but I do love crafts.

Halloween Rock Painting
Halloween rock painting is an easy holiday craft that can turn out great (if you're actually talented) or so so if you're like me and have little to no talent.

Jar Crafts
I usually recycle my glass jars, but I also tend to keep a whole bunch of them for crafts. Glass jars, of course, are great for storing things.

Make Egg Carton Flower Lights
For an inexpensive way to brighten a room (literally), make egg carton flower lights. This simple recycled craft is easy to make, cheap, and beautiful!

Dictionary Page Art
I'm a freelance copy editor as well as a writer so you could say I'm a bit of a word nerd. I also love crafting. What's better than making dictionary page art?

Crafts Using Tins
Do you have empty tins that you hate to just throw away? These crafts using tins will give you lots of ideas for putting these little containers to good use.

How to Make a Tin Can Man
I adore the funky and absurd, so when I gathered my collection of bottle caps, some rusty wire, and a colorful tin can, I was so happy when this tin can man*.

Bottle Caps Crafts--Making Art With Bottle Caps
Bottle caps crafts range from simple bottle cap necklaces or magnets to this grand lady shown here with bottle cap arms and legs.

How to Make a Hamburger Pendant with Found Objects
If you're fond of food, especially hamburgers and like to wear your food, here's how to make a hamburger pendant with found objects.

Affiliate Disclosure

This author, Peggy Hazelwood, participates in Amazon, eBay, All Posters, and other affiliate advertising programs. When you click an advertising link on this page and make a purchase, I receive a small percent of the sale. Thank you for reading this far!

Do you recycle with kids?

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment

    • Erin Mellor profile image

      Erin Mellor 4 years ago from Europe

      I clicked over to the lint blog out of curiosity - who knew there was so much to read about lint! It's oddly compelling.

    • allaneaglesham lm profile image

      allaneaglesham lm 5 years ago

      Living in Germany re-cycling is very much part of the culture. This page does a great job of summarizing what children and adults should know to save the environment.

    • Cynthia Haltom profile image

      Cynthia Haltom 5 years ago from Diamondhead

      I recycle without the kids since they are grown and out ot the house.

    • gottaloveit2 profile image

      gottaloveit2 5 years ago

      You write the best articles! I love how involved you are with your children and grandchildren. Way blessed!

    • SandyMertens profile image

      Sandy Mertens 5 years ago from Frozen Tundra

      I love recycling projects. You have some great ideas here.

    • profile image

      donnaelder 5 years ago

      Yes I do recycle with my little girls.

    • PiccadillyPunkin profile image

      PiccadillyPunkin 5 years ago

      SUPER ideas! I'll have to try some of these with my kids! What a helpful lens!

    • Teddi14 LM profile image

      Teddi14 LM 5 years ago

      Love the idea to make looms out of old socks!!!! Fabulous.

    • TapIn2U profile image

      TapIn2U 5 years ago

      Great ideas! Kids will enjoy making these. Sundae ;-)

    • profile image

      anonymous 5 years ago

      Definately and our local youth in this little town in Finland even campaign to rise the awareness of how important recycling is even at young age :) http: //www.youtube.com/watch?v=NqmTd2jd4X4&sns=fb

    • profile image

      anonymous 5 years ago

      great ideas!

    • Ninche profile image

      Ninche 5 years ago

      I do recycle and I will definitely show this lens to my friends with kids! Blessed,

    • ItayaLightbourne profile image

      Itaya Lightbourne 5 years ago from Topeka, KS

      As my little grandson gets older I'm sure I will talk to him more and more about recycling and repurposing items into fun and useful things. Loved having a peek at your Lint Blog. What a cute idea! :)

    • profile image

      Deida999 5 years ago

      Great looking!

    • profile image

      kathryn-gillespie 5 years ago

      I went to a water filter pitcher and refill it several times a day instead of buying bottles of water. Growing up we did a lot of reducing, reusing and recycling! Habits die hard. :) Great lens!

    • profile image

      anonymous 5 years ago

      I've always recycled it seems so when I had kids they followed my example and now my grandchildren just think its normal...a wonderful lesson in practicing social responsibility with children in an effective way!

    • profile image

      anonymous 5 years ago

      I like you're ideas.

    • TaraWojt profile image

      Tara Wojtaszek 5 years ago

      Some really great ideas to get the little ones involved. Thanks.

    • Sher Ritchie profile image

      Sher Ritchie 6 years ago

      Mom always saved cardboard rolls and Popsicle sticks and things like that for me to make into - everything! So it's been part of our family for years. It's still so much fun to take something that would be thrown out and turn it into something special again - like a craft project. I love your lens, I've featured it on mine: http://www.squidoo.com/zoo-with-paper-animals-for-... Thanks for sharing!

    • profile image

      Terrie_Schultz 6 years ago

      Great ideas here!

    • shahedashaikh profile image

      shahedashaikh 6 years ago

      Great ideas on recycling and reuse.

    • TransplantedSoul profile image

      TransplantedSoul 6 years ago

      YES! This is such an important message for them. Generations of people before us have left us with the mess we have now --- time to change!

    • profile image

      leeleon 6 years ago

      nice lens. welcome to see my ideas of reusing eggshells.

    • GramaBarb profile image

      GramaBarb 6 years ago from Vancouver

      All my grandkids RRR. some great tips here!

    • JenniferAkers LM profile image

      JenniferAkers LM 6 years ago

      Yes, we recycle and reuse. We've made some great gifts and household object by transforming objects into things we'll use over and over. Great lens!

    • shiwangipeshwani profile image

      shiwangipeshwani 6 years ago

      Superb ideas...how to do get these ideas from dear..

    • Lee Hansen profile image

      Lee Hansen 6 years ago from Vermont

      Just stopping back on my Angels Bus Trip to bless this favorite kids recycling lens.

    • hsschulte profile image

      hsschulte 6 years ago

      I just love this lens. I do hope your write more about recycling with kids!

    • Scarlettohairy profile image
      Author

      Peggy Hazelwood 6 years ago from Desert Southwest, U.S.A.

      @LisaAuch1: Thanks, LisaAuch, for the Squid Angel blessing!

    • Scarlettohairy profile image
      Author

      Peggy Hazelwood 6 years ago from Desert Southwest, U.S.A.

      @TolovajWordsmith: Good info to know, Tolovaj.

    • LisaAuch1 profile image

      Lisa Auch 6 years ago from Scotland

      I was the Eco School teacher for a few years, but i was amazed what my daughter brought home too from her school, and secretly pleased too! great that so many people are becoming aware now - Great page - Blessed

    • TolovajWordsmith profile image

      Tolovaj Publishing House 6 years ago from Ljubljana

      Well written and very educational. As a trained scientist I can only add nothing is 100% green. So my philosophy is more precycling (reducing) than recycling;)

    • Kiosks4business profile image

      Kiosks4business 6 years ago

      What a brilliant lens - so many ideas to teach children how to recycle. Excellent lens!

    • Mark-Nehs profile image

      Mark-Nehs 6 years ago

      So true, my Nathan had a recycling project at school last year and he has forced us to step it up a notch.

    • profile image

      bossypants 6 years ago

      No kids here, but since we are just big kids, ouselves, we like all your ideas!

    • Scarlettohairy profile image
      Author

      Peggy Hazelwood 6 years ago from Desert Southwest, U.S.A.

      @Lee Hansen: Pastiche, thank you! I sincerely appreciate the link to your Earth Day crafts for kids lens. Woo hoo!

    • Lee Hansen profile image

      Lee Hansen 6 years ago from Vermont

      Kids crafts made with recycled materials are at the top of my favorites list all year long. I'm featuring this lens on my Earth Day crafts for kids lens ... thanks for the great resource.

    • Scarlettohairy profile image
      Author

      Peggy Hazelwood 6 years ago from Desert Southwest, U.S.A.

      @happynutritionist: Thanks so much! I haven't figured out how to do that. Great idea.

    • profile image

      happynutritionist 6 years ago

      Great lens...I'm going to add it to the plexo on my "using leftover soap pieces" lens:-) Anyone can add recycling type lenses to the plexo there.

    • profile image

      Runnn 6 years ago

      Thanks for raising the awareness and educate the kids.

    • smithlights profile image

      smithlights 7 years ago

      Great lens! I totally love it!

    • Scarlettohairy profile image
      Author

      Peggy Hazelwood 7 years ago from Desert Southwest, U.S.A.

      @gottaloveit2: I added a few since I published the lens.Thanks for taking another look, Lori!

    • Scarlettohairy profile image
      Author

      Peggy Hazelwood 7 years ago from Desert Southwest, U.S.A.

      @Pam Irie: Pam, I didn't do as many crafts with my kids but guess I have more time now to do them with my grandkids. It's so fun to save all my trash (well, a lot of it!) so we can play. They love just painting toilet paper rolls, too.

    • gottaloveit2 profile image

      gottaloveit2 7 years ago

      Great lens, Peggy! I think I must have missed it the first time around. Love the pictures!

    • Pam Irie profile image

      Pam Irie 7 years ago from Land of Aloha

      We didn't do a lot of crafty art stuff when the kids were little, but they both got good lessons in recycling furniture. From the dumpster, clean it up, spit and polish, and it's good to go.

    • Scarlettohairy profile image
      Author

      Peggy Hazelwood 7 years ago from Desert Southwest, U.S.A.

      @Diane Cass: Composting is another great way to recycle. My kids both compost but I live in a condo so don't do that any more.

    • Diane Cass profile image

      Diane Cass 7 years ago from New York

      We taught our kids to recycle and reuse by example. We compost kitchen waste to make rich soil for our garden, take good items that are no longer used to the Thrift store so that others can enjoy them, and recycle plastic, glass and as many other things as we can.

    • Scarlettohairy profile image
      Author

      Peggy Hazelwood 7 years ago from Desert Southwest, U.S.A.

      @Ann Hinds: Oh, I know, Wordstock. I don't recycle all I could, I'm sure. I prefer eating off "real" plates and use cloth napkins for the same reason. It's easy to throw the cloth napkins in the wash with towels. And I buy them at thrift stores (and I never pay more than 50 cents each).

    • Scarlettohairy profile image
      Author

      Peggy Hazelwood 7 years ago from Desert Southwest, U.S.A.

      @Gayle Mclaughlin: Thanks, Gayle.

    • Ann Hinds profile image

      Ann Hinds 7 years ago from So Cal

      OK, I hate the poll, it reminds me that I could do better. I like the recycling symbol idea and we will start using it at the store. We stopped using paper plates a long time ago and instead use the good dishes. Great ideas

    • Gayle Mclaughlin profile image

      Gayle 7 years ago from McLaughlin

      I love this lens! It gives such good advice and activities! Thanks for the ideas.

    • Scarlettohairy profile image
      Author

      Peggy Hazelwood 7 years ago from Desert Southwest, U.S.A.

      @Virginia Allain: You know, you're exactly right. Lots of good craft supplies are junk!

    • Virginia Allain profile image

      Virginia Allain 7 years ago from Central Florida

      We used to make lots of kid's crafts at the library programs from egg cartons, milk jugs and other junk. Lots of fun.

    • Scarlettohairy profile image
      Author

      Peggy Hazelwood 7 years ago from Desert Southwest, U.S.A.

      @Momose: Yes, put those kids to work and have fun while shopping!

    • Scarlettohairy profile image
      Author

      Peggy Hazelwood 7 years ago from Desert Southwest, U.S.A.

      @Frischy: That is an excellent example of all the stuff that can be reused for kids crafts! That maraca sounds wonderful!

    • Scarlettohairy profile image
      Author

      Peggy Hazelwood 7 years ago from Desert Southwest, U.S.A.

      @gottaloveit2: Well, they are fun to make so make yourself a pair, Lori!

    • gottaloveit2 profile image

      gottaloveit2 7 years ago

      I LOVE the binoculars but Gert won't keep 'em on!

    • Frischy profile image

      Frischy 7 years ago from Kentucky, USA

      My daughter just made a maraca out of an empty water bottle at VBS. Put beans in the water bottle, Attach a handle made of rolled up cardboard. Using masking tape, cover the handle. Glue scraps of colored tissue paper to cover the bottle. Paint the maraca with watered down paint. Cover with glitter if desired.

    • profile image

      Momose 7 years ago

      I love the idea of searching for the PET symbols. Will initiate that one right away! Great article!

    working

    This website uses cookies

    As a user in the EEA, your approval is needed on a few things. To provide a better website experience, hubpages.com uses cookies (and other similar technologies) and may collect, process, and share personal data. Please choose which areas of our service you consent to our doing so.

    For more information on managing or withdrawing consents and how we handle data, visit our Privacy Policy at: "https://hubpages.com/privacy-policy#gdpr"

    Show Details
    Necessary
    HubPages Device IDThis is used to identify particular browsers or devices when the access the service, and is used for security reasons.
    LoginThis is necessary to sign in to the HubPages Service.
    Google RecaptchaThis is used to prevent bots and spam. (Privacy Policy)
    AkismetThis is used to detect comment spam. (Privacy Policy)
    HubPages Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide data on traffic to our website, all personally identifyable data is anonymized. (Privacy Policy)
    HubPages Traffic PixelThis is used to collect data on traffic to articles and other pages on our site. Unless you are signed in to a HubPages account, all personally identifiable information is anonymized.
    Amazon Web ServicesThis is a cloud services platform that we used to host our service. (Privacy Policy)
    CloudflareThis is a cloud CDN service that we use to efficiently deliver files required for our service to operate such as javascript, cascading style sheets, images, and videos. (Privacy Policy)
    Google Hosted LibrariesJavascript software libraries such as jQuery are loaded at endpoints on the googleapis.com or gstatic.com domains, for performance and efficiency reasons. (Privacy Policy)
    Features
    Google Custom SearchThis is feature allows you to search the site. (Privacy Policy)
    Google MapsSome articles have Google Maps embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    Google ChartsThis is used to display charts and graphs on articles and the author center. (Privacy Policy)
    Google AdSense Host APIThis service allows you to sign up for or associate a Google AdSense account with HubPages, so that you can earn money from ads on your articles. No data is shared unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    Google YouTubeSome articles have YouTube videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    VimeoSome articles have Vimeo videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    PaypalThis is used for a registered author who enrolls in the HubPages Earnings program and requests to be paid via PayPal. No data is shared with Paypal unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    Facebook LoginYou can use this to streamline signing up for, or signing in to your Hubpages account. No data is shared with Facebook unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    MavenThis supports the Maven widget and search functionality. (Privacy Policy)
    Marketing
    Google AdSenseThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Google DoubleClickGoogle provides ad serving technology and runs an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Index ExchangeThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    SovrnThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Facebook AdsThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Amazon Unified Ad MarketplaceThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    AppNexusThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    OpenxThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Rubicon ProjectThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    TripleLiftThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Say MediaWe partner with Say Media to deliver ad campaigns on our sites. (Privacy Policy)
    Remarketing PixelsWe may use remarketing pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to advertise the HubPages Service to people that have visited our sites.
    Conversion Tracking PixelsWe may use conversion tracking pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to identify when an advertisement has successfully resulted in the desired action, such as signing up for the HubPages Service or publishing an article on the HubPages Service.
    Statistics
    Author Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide traffic data and reports to the authors of articles on the HubPages Service. (Privacy Policy)
    ComscoreComScore is a media measurement and analytics company providing marketing data and analytics to enterprises, media and advertising agencies, and publishers. Non-consent will result in ComScore only processing obfuscated personal data. (Privacy Policy)
    Amazon Tracking PixelSome articles display amazon products as part of the Amazon Affiliate program, this pixel provides traffic statistics for those products (Privacy Policy)