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When Does Child Support End?

Updated on May 18, 2013

It is not what you think in every state!

This is a common question asked by those obligated to pay child support. The general thought is that it ends at either the age of 18, and/or graduation from High School. However, the first problem with this is that 18 is not the Age of Majority in every state. In Mississippi it is age 21, while in American Samoa, it's age 14. Plus, there are other considerations, such as College and any extended disability in the child(ren).

From The Dads House National Moderator:
Due to recent "unannounced" changes to Squidoo page designs, the Dads House Manual has been moved. Click on this link to find When Does Child Support End? on the new site.

When It Ends
First, it should be noted that Florida and New Jersey has removed its law addressing this. Unless specified in the original court order, it continues until ruled on otherwise by the court.

Check the list below to see if it extends beyond age 18, or stops before than under certain circumstances. If you live in a state where it's time for your child support to end on one or more of your children, contact Child Support Enforcement to make an official request to modify or discontinue the support order at least 60 days prior to the date.

By not doing so, the agency will continue to deduct the amount from your payroll, and there is no refund, as this New York father learned, "Man wrongly docked $40G from paycheck for child support".

It takes at least this long to be considered for a modification. When going the Child Support Enforcement Office to make the request, a man should consider taking a woman with him. By having her make the initial request for info, there is less of a chance of being denied as sometimes they are less accommodating of men. If you must file your own request with the court, this is similar to the filing of a Child Support Modification. (See YouTube below for video on modifications)

College Years

Note that some states do require child support through college, plus this could be an added obligation under a court order in all states.

Following is a list of states and the designated ages. Check Child Support Collections.com for further info on a state's child support laws. Note that in Mississippi and New York, child support does not end until age 21, regardless of circumstances.

These States require child support paid into the college years

  • Arizona to age 21
  • District of Columbia to age 21
  • Iowa to age 22
  • Massachusetts to age 22
  • Missouri to age 22, with a requirement of 5 credit hours minimum
  • New Jersey to age 22
  • Utah to age 21
  • Washington to age 22 plus college expenses

Dads House Educational eManual: Now available on Lulu.com. Can be downloaded into your computer or Smartphone for viewing and use anytime.

Includes all attached sample and interactive forms. See this link for eManual Sample Version.


  • Alabama

    Generally, at 19 years of age.

    Alaska

    The child support obligation continues past 18 years of age, as long as the child is unmarried, is a full-time high school student and is not self-supporting. In this case, the child support obligation will end when the child reaches 19 years of age or graduates high school, whichever of these occurs first.

    Arkansas

    Generally, the obligation ends when the child reaches 18 years of age or the child graduates from high school, whichever occurs later. A child will also automatically be ineligible for child support if that child marries, is removed from disability status by a court order, or the child dies.

    Arizona

    Generally, when the child reaches 18 years of age or graduates from high school, whichever occurs later. A child automatically becomes ineligible for child support if he/she marries, is adopted, or dies.

    California

    The child support obligation continues past 18 years of age, as long as the child is unmarried, is a full-time high school student and is not self-supporting. In this case, the child support obligation will end when the child reaches 19 years of age or graduates high school, whichever of these occurs first.

    Colorado

    If your child support order was entered on or after July, 1997, the support obligation stops when the child turns 19 unless:

    the parties agree otherwise by a stipulation signed after July 1997

    the child is mentally or physically disabled, and the court orders past age 19

    the child is in high school, or an equivalent program; in this case, support continues until a month after graduation but not beyond the age of 21

    If your child support order was entered prior to July, 1997, the support obligation terminates when the child turns 19 unless:

    the parties agree otherwise by a written stipulation after July 1, 1991

    the child is mentally or physically disabled and the court orders support past age 19

    the child is in high school, or an equivalent program, in which case, support continues until a month after graduation but not beyond the age of 21 unless there is an order for post-secondary education ordering support to continue through post-secondary education

    Connecticut

    If there is an unmarried child that's reached 18, is a full-time high school student and lives with one of the parents, the parents will maintain their respective support if the child needs it, until the child completes the twelfth grade or reaches 19 years of age, whichever comes first. If the child becomes emancipated, the obligation to pay support ends.

    Delaware

    If there is an unmarried child that's reached 18, is a full-time high school student and lives with one of the parents, the parents will maintain their respective support if the child needs it, until the child completes the twelfth grade or reaches 19 years of age, whichever comes first.

    District of Columbia

    When the child is age 21.

    Florida

    If there is an unmarried child that's reached 18, is a full-time high school student and lives with one of the parents, the parents will maintain their respective support if the child needs it, until the child completes the twelfth grade or reaches 19 years of age, whichever comes first.

    Note: A new law that modifies when child support will end is set to take effect on October 1, 2010. The new statute provides that all child support orders entered after October 1st must provide a date at which the order must be terminated or modified.

    Georgia

    Generally, the obligation ends when the child reaches 18 years of age or the child graduates from high school, whichever occurs later. A child will also automatically be ineligible for child support if that child marries, is removed from disability status by a court order, or the child dies.

    Guam

    Generally, the obligation ends when the child reaches 18 years of age or the child graduates from high school, whichever occurs later. However, a court can order the obligation to continue for an indefinite period if the child is disabled. A child will automatically be ineligible for child support if that child marries, is removed from disability status by a court order, or the child dies.

    Hawaii

    Generally, the obligation ends when the child reaches 18 years of age.

    Idaho

    When the child turns 18 years of age. If the child is still in high school, payments will continue until the child graduates or turns 19, whichever occurs first.

    Illinois

    Generally, the obligation ends when the child reaches 18 years of age.

    Indiana

    The obligation ends when the child reaches 19 years of age, unless emancipated prior to this age.

    Iowa

    Generally, the obligation ends when the child reaches 18 years of age or the child graduates from high school, whichever occurs later. A child will also automatically be ineligible for child support if that child marries, is removed from disability status by a court order, or the child dies.

    Kansas

    Generally, the obligation ends when the child reaches 18 years of age unless the child is still in high school - in which case the support ends upon the child's graduation from high school, or the child's 19th birthday, whichever occurs first.

    Kentucky

    Generally, the obligation ends when the child reaches 18 years of age unless the child is still in high school - in which case the support ends upon the child's graduation from high school, or the child's 19th birthday, whichever occurs first.

    Louisiana

    Generally, the obligation ends when the child reaches 18 years of age unless the child is still in high school - in which case the support ends upon the child's graduation from high school, or the child's 19th birthday, whichever occurs first.

    Maine

    Generally, the obligation ends when the child reaches 18 years of age unless the child is still in high school - in which case the support ends upon the child's graduation from high school, or the child's 19th birthday, whichever occurs first. A child will also automatically be ineligible for child support if that child marries, or becomes a member of the armed services.

    Maryland

    Generally, the obligation ends when the child reaches 18 years of age or the child graduates from high school, whichever occurs later. A child will also automatically be ineligible for child support if that child marries, is removed from disability status by a court order, or the child dies.

    Massachusetts

    Generally, the obligation ends when the child reaches 18 years of age.

    Michigan

    Generally, the obligation ends when the child reaches 18 years of age or the child graduates from high school, whichever occurs later.

    Minnesota

    Generally, the obligation ends when the child reaches 18 years of age or the child graduates from high school, whichever occurs later. A child will also automatically be ineligible for child support if that child marries, or is removed from disability status by a court order.

    Mississippi

    Generally, the obligation ends when the child reaches 21 years of age.

    Missouri

    Generally, the obligation ends when the child reaches 18 years of age or the child graduates from high school, whichever occurs later, but continues until age 23 if attending college with a five credit hour minimum. A child will also automatically be ineligible for child support if that child marries, is removed from disability status by a court order, or the child dies.

    Montana

    Generally, the obligation ends when the child reaches 18 years of age or the child graduates from high school, whichever occurs later.

    Nebraska

    Generally, at 19 years of age.

    Nevada

    Generally, the obligation ends when the child reaches 18 years of age unless the child is still in high school - in which case the support ends upon the child's graduation from high school, or the child's 19th birthday, whichever occurs first. A child will also automatically be ineligible for child support if that child is removed from disability status by a court order.

    New Hampshire

    Generally, the obligation ends when the child reaches 18 years of age. Obligation also ends when the child gets married or begins military service.

    New Jersey

    There is no fixed age in New Jersey when support stops. Once your child turns 18 and/or becomes financially independent, either you or the other parent must file papers with the court asking that the order be terminated or adjusted. This is known as "emancipation." Based on the facts, the court will decide if the child still needs support from the parents.

    Generally, the court presumes that children under 18 need support from their parents. In some cases, support may continue through college or longer. Support may terminate automatically if your current order specifies a date, age or circumstance when support stops.

    New Mexico

    Generally, the obligation ends when the child reaches 18 years of age. A child will also automatically be ineligible for child support if that child marries, or is removed from disability status by a court order.

    New York

    Generally, the obligation ends when the child reaches 21 years of age. A child over the age of 21 will also automatically be ineligible for child support if that child is removed from disability status by a court order.

    North Carolina

    Generally, the obligation ends when the child reaches 18 years of age.

    If the child is already otherwise emancipated, payments will stop at the time of emancipation.

    If the child is still in primary or secondary school when he or she reaches the age of 18, support payments will continue until that child graduates, ceases to attend school on a regular basis, fails to make satisfactory academic progress towards graduation or reaches the age of 20 - whichever of these comes first. Based on its discretion, the court may order payments to cease at age 18, regardless of graduation date or any other factors.

    North Dakota

    Generally, the obligation ends when the child reaches 18 years of age.

    Ohio

    Generally, the obligation ends when the child reaches 18 years of age or the child graduates from high school, whichever occurs later. A child will also automatically be ineligible for child support if that child marries, or is removed from disability status by a court order.

    Oklahoma

    When the child reaches the age of 18 or graduates from high school, whichever occurs last. If the child marries, child support is no longer required.

    Oregon

    Generally, the obligation ends when the child reaches 18 years of age or 21 years of age if the child is in school half-time or more.

    Pennsylvania

    Generally, the obligation ends when the child reaches 18 years of age or the child graduates from high school, whichever occurs later. A child will also automatically be ineligible for child support is removed from disability status by a court order.

    Puerto Rico

    Generally, the obligation ends when the child reaches 18 years of age or the child graduates from high school, whichever occurs later. However, a court can order the obligation to continue for an indefinite period if the child is disabled. A child will automatically be ineligible for child support if that child marries, is removed from disability status by a court order, or the child dies.

    Rhode Island

    Generally, the obligation ends when the child reaches 18 years of age. The court has the discretion to order child support and educational expenses for children attending high school when the child is 18 or for 90 days after graduation. Child support will not be awarded for a child 19 years or older. If the child suffers from disabilities that require care and expense, the court may award support until he or she reaches 21 years of age.

    South Carolina

    Generally, the obligation ends when the child reaches 18 years of age or the child graduates from high school, whichever occurs later. A child will also automatically be ineligible for child support if that child is removed from disability status by a court order.

    South Dakota

    Generally, the obligation ends when the child reaches 18 years of age unless the child is still in high school - in which case the support ends upon the child's graduation from high school, or the child's 19th birthday, whichever occurs first. A child will also automatically be ineligible for child support if that child marries, is removed from disability status by a court order, or the child dies.

    Tennessee

    Generally, the obligation ends when the child reaches 18 years of age or the child graduates from high school, whichever occurs later.

    Texas

    Generally, the obligation ends when the child reaches 18 years of age or the child graduates from high school, whichever occurs later. However, a court can order the obligation to continue for an indefinite period if the child is disabled. A child will automatically be ineligible for child support if that child marries, is removed from disability status by a court order, or the child dies.

    US Virgin Islands

    Generally, the obligation ends when the child reaches 18 years of age or the child graduates from high school, whichever occurs later. However, a court can order the obligation to continue for an indefinite period if the child is disabled. A child will automatically be ineligible for child support if that child marries, is removed from disability status by a court order, or the child dies.

    Utah

    Generally, the obligation ends when the child reaches 18 years of age or the child graduates from high school, whichever occurs later. A child will also automatically be ineligible for child support if that child marries, is removed from disability status by a court order, or the child dies.

    Vermont

    Generally, the obligation ends when the child reaches 18 years of age or the child graduates from high school, whichever occurs later. A child will also automatically be ineligible for child support if that child marries, is removed from disability status by a court order, or the child dies.

    Virginia

    Generally, the obligation ends when the child reaches 18 years of age or the child graduates from high school, whichever occurs later. A child will also automatically be ineligible for child support if that child marries, is removed from disability status by a court order, or the child dies.

    Washington

    Generally, the obligation ends when the child reaches 18 years of age or the child graduates from high school, whichever occurs later. A child will also automatically be ineligible for child support if that child marries, is removed from disability status by a court order, or the child dies.

    When considering whether or not to order support for post secondary educational expenses, the court shall determine whether or not the child is in fact dependent and is relying upon the parents for the reasonable necessities of life. The court will exercise its discretion when determining whether or not and for how long to award post secondary educational support based upon the following factors:

    the age of the child

    the child's needs

    the expectations of the parties for their children when the parents were together

    the child's prospects, desires, aptitudes, abilities and/or disabilities

    the nature of the post secondary education being sought

    the parents' level of education

    the parents' standard of living

    the parents' current and future resources

    the amount and type of support that the child would have received if the parents had stayed together

    West Virginia

    Generally, the obligation ends when the child reaches 18 years of age or the child graduates from high school, whichever occurs later. A child will also automatically be ineligible for child support if that child marries, is removed from disability status by a court order, or the child dies.

    Upon finding good cause, a court may order that child support payments continue beyond the age of 18 if the child is unmarried, residing with a parent and is enrolled as a full-time student in a secondary or vocational program and making substantial progress towards a diploma. In this case, payments will not extend past the date that the child reaches the age of 20.

    Wisconsin

    Generally, the obligation ends when the child reaches 18 years of age or the child graduates from high school, whichever occurs later. A child will also automatically be ineligible for child support if that child marries, is removed from disability status by a court order, or the child dies.

    Wyoming

    Generally, the obligation ends when the child reaches 18 years of age or the child graduates from high school, whichever occurs later. A child will also automatically be ineligible for child support if that child marries, is legally emancipated, dies or enters military service.

Reader Comments

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      Terry in Mississippi 2 years ago

      What is the law when your 18/19 in November child decides not to attend college after high school this year. She should have reg. for school by August if she were going... Then when we hire an atty to have her emancipated her mother signs her up with an online college just to try to keep child support....

    • profile image

      CristianStan 4 years ago

      Child support is probably everyone nightmare, definitely check out this lens before you think about paying it

    • profile image
      Author

      George McCasland 4 years ago

      @anonymous: That is why I developed the Dads House Manual. It teaches fathers what their rights are, and how to fight for them. The problem here is not as much child support as it is attorneys who are not fully prepared to represent obligors. Family law is not a required course in law school. Most only do family law as a fall back position, and only after taking just enough CLE Courses to qualify. Today, they take them online. Even those with the knowledge will not take the time to teach their clients what is truly needed to fully accomplish success. Remember, by doing just enough to make it look like the system is bias creates more business for them when you have to pay them more to go back and do it again. The full manual is available free to use on here, or at this link for downloading in a PDF format.

      http://www.lulu.com/spotlight/Fathers_Rights_eManu...

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      Greetings, having been through the same and continuing nightmare as millions of other folks,, my thesis is this,,, there is NO MONEY IN RESOLVE. The legal leeches running this charade are not concerned with the welfare of children or parents. They are there for repeat business at the emotional expense of all those involved. It is more worth their while to fan the flames of hatred between plaintiff and defendant. To me they are pure evil.

    • profile image
      Author

      George McCasland 4 years ago

      @anonymous: This material is also now available as an eMnaual at this link. Though there is a charge for it, the FREE online material will remain, and be maintained. http://www.lulu.com/spotlight/Fathers_Rights_eManu...

    • profile image
      Author

      George McCasland 4 years ago

      @anonymous: This material is also now available as an eMnaual at this link. Thought there is a charge for it, the FREE online material will remain, and be maintained. http://www.lulu.com/spotlight/Fathers_Rights_eManu...

    • profile image
      Author

      George McCasland 4 years ago

      @Gypzeerose: This material is also now available as an eMnaual at this link. Thought there is a charge for it, the FREE online material will remain, and be maintained. http://www.lulu.com/spotlight/Fathers_Rights_eManu...

    • profile image
      Author

      George McCasland 4 years ago

      @anonymous: This material is also now available as an eMnaual at this link. Thought there is a charge for it, the FREE online material will remain, and be maintained. http://www.lulu.com/spotlight/Fathers_Rights_eManu...

    • profile image
      Author

      George McCasland 4 years ago

      @anonymous: This material is also now available as an eMnaual at this link. Thought there is a charge for it, the FREE online material will remain, and be maintained. http://www.lulu.com/spotlight/Fathers_Rights_eManu...

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      @OffshoreFinanci: Amen....and if they have children of their own-still gotta pay. If they say they don't get any help from the child support-still gotta pay...and on and on...

    • profile image
      Author

      George McCasland 4 years ago

      @OffshoreFinanci: Also boys until age 25 in El Salvador, and age 27 in Indiana, and they are,

      https://hubpages.com/family/TeenagersNearAdultOrNe...

    • OffshoreFinanci profile image

      OffshoreFinanci 4 years ago

      Funny that people are still kids until 21 in Mississippi!

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      @anonymous: By the way, my son was 3 yrs old when she took him from me...so you do the math, lest you think I've only been paying for a few yrs.

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      @anonymous: Stop assuming that 1) its always the dad that walks away from the family 2) every man makes enough to support two households, and 3) that just because we want to end the support once our obligation is met, there is something wrong with us. The law lays out what is required from us, and trust me they put a lot of time in calculating a fair amount. Therefore, once I have paid what they DEMAND (and maybe if it wasn't ORDERED, we dads would be more willing to give more), then I sure as Heck will request the order to be modified according to the LAW. My ex is the one who filed for divorce...she is the one who moved my child over and over again because she couldn't make it staying in one place...SHE is the one who ran me down to my son over and over again...and yet he still knows who the parent is that has supported him, loved him, and always taken his cause up. Its ME. So, I'm so sorry that you are suffering, but so are lot of men out there. I lived with my parents for 2 yrs after I got divorced at 36 because I was ordered to pay $800 a month plus alimony plus insurance until she could get her act together, when I only take home $2200 a month. The amount went down eventually, after I had to jump through hoops provided by all of the WONDERFUL ladies at the Child Support Enforcement agency when I requested to have the order modified...now its still over $500 a month. I have paid my support dutifully and have not missed even one payment. Now, it is her turn to struggle to make ends meet, and I don't feel one iota of remorse for requesting to have the order modified. Of course, she has told him that he must move out when that happens. At that time, he will move in with me and go to college financed by ME with no help from her. At least I am used to paying the $500 a month, so I can just put it toward his schooling for 4 more yrs before I catch a break. Please spare me the female sob stories, because there are plenty of us out here doing what we ought to do, and plenty of deadbeat MOMS walking around spending the kids money on themselves.

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      My husband has 3 children, the 22 year old in college works and lives with a few friends off campus, then the middle one is 21 works and part time student living in home, youngest child is 19 living at home working full time and dropped out of college. My husband put in for modification to end child support or get and end date. WE have been in bondage for the 19 years! Is there any hope the judge will end this torture? They live in VB, Virginia but the order was done in Massachusetts. There is no contact unless mom and her offspring want more money or want to cause trouble. How much longer in this dark tunnel?

    • profile image
      Author

      George McCasland 4 years ago

      @Gypzeerose: If you check my primary index lens, you will find a few that may also be handy.

      https://hubpages.com/relationships/FathersRightsIn

      You might consider posting your lens to the Dads House Fan Page.

      http://www.facebook.com/DadsHouseEdCenter

    • Gypzeerose profile image

      Rose Jones 4 years ago

      Thoughtful lens - excellent amount of research and a good service to others. Blessed and pinned to my "Being a Dad" board.

    • profile image
      Author

      George McCasland 4 years ago

      @anonymous: If there is a child support order in place, when the child turned age 18, than it does continue until age 21. However, as a part of an intact home, if this is the choice the child makes, than the child lives with that choice, and is responsible for their own support.

      https://hubpages.com/family/TeenagersNearAdultOrNe

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      oh i forgot to mention, I live in the state of New York.

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      I'd like to know if a parent has to pay child support on a 19 year old who chooses to leave the home (because they disobey parental rules in the home) yet this 19 yr old wants parents to support him. Why should parents have to help him financially when this young adult is working and HAS a place to live and have it all. I feel if he chooses to leave, then he's capable of living and supporting himself. Your comments please. I'd really like an answer from a legal standpoint. Thank you,

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      My child support was amended because my daughter turned 18. We live in Louisiana so 18 is considered emancipated for child support. I was also advised by several people that I could drop her off my medical insurance due to the fact she is emancipated. So I dropped her off medical insurance. Now my ex wife is threatening to take me back to court claiming that I could not drop her just because she is now emancipated. She stated I am still required to keep her on insurance. Is this true? I don't feel like I should have to keep her on insurance since she is now emancipated. Please clarify.

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      @George McCasland: The child support order is in West Virginia and I'm in Texas. Texas arrears is showing less than West Virginia.

    • profile image
      Author

      George McCasland 4 years ago

      @anonymous: As for the pregnant daughter, no it does not affect your support, but you might consider finding out who the father is and send him these.

      https://hubpages.com/education/TeenBoysNSexEd

      https://hubpages.com/relationships/PriceOfShacking

      As for the 20 year old, that depends on the state you are in, as noted above. As for the adjustments, they are not checking on you, or even have a means to do so. Your ex has to notify them, except for every 36 months, when child support enforcement has to do a case review, under federal law. As for you getting it modified, that only requires you to make the official request to have it done. I would need to know what state the child support order is in to tell you any more. Post it here.

      http://www.facebook.com/DadsHouseEdCenter

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      Are you still responsible for paying child support, if your daughter becomes pregnant & having her own child? But she is still in high school. Also my oldest is now 20 & not going to college, am I still responsible for her? Why is that child support is quick to pick up on when you are working, but don't do a follow up when the kids age has changed? Lastly, how is that from state to state, if you have arrears, they don't match?

    • profile image
      Author

      George McCasland 4 years ago

      @anonymous: Contact child support enforcement and make an official request to have the order modified, or stopped if there are no other children. They are obligated under federal law to help either parent, upon request. DO NOT GO THERE ASKING WHAT THEY CAN DO OR FOR ADVICE. You inform them you are making an official request for a review. They cannot give advice, you must know what you want.

      Check out this project we are working on.

      http://www.facebook.com/MenDontTell

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      My son has quit school, he was to graduate this year, I pay support to his mother that he does not live with. Our divorce papers state(this is word for word from the divorce papers) child reaches age of 18, provided that, the child is fully enrolled in an accredited secondary school in a program leading toward a high school diploms, the periodic child-support payments shall contine to be due and paid until the end of the school year in which the child graduates, marries, dies, any child disabilities are otherwise removed from general purposes, any child is otherwise emancipated (which he has been a couple times) further order modifying this support. Should I pursue this?

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      @JJNW: But why force the father to do the same thing with his hard-won cash? I recommend advising your children to be self-sufficient, not leaches.

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      @anonymous: I have no sympathy for you and for your little leaches. Let them take student loans. Or get a part-time job. I agree with your husband- no more child support for you. I was literally kicked out of my house, I did not desert my family, I was sent by the Army away for one year, and I came back to a restraining order and taken to jail. F*uck all you mommies straight up the a*s together with your spawn. I hope you all die a painful death and go to rot in hell.

    • profile image
      Author

      George McCasland 4 years ago

      @anonymous: My apologies for having missed this earlier. The Dads House manual gets over 14,000 hits a month, so I tend to stay busy. A good thing I live in a nursing home and have the time.

      First note that we have a Michigan Chapter.

      http://www.facebook.com/groups/MI.DadsHouseEdCtr/

      As for when it ends, in Michigan, generally, the obligation ends when the child reaches 18 years of age or the child graduates from high school, whichever occurs later. When did the child graduate?

      https://hubpages.com/relationships/ChildSupportWhe

      As for the arrears, they are owed the parent and not the child. However, you need to file a motion with the court to have any interest penalties set aside, and for a final judgement on arrears owed. That way you know exactly what you still owe. Over 80% of the reported child support owed is just Interest penalties.

      http://aspe.hhs.gov/hsp/07/assessing-CS-debt/execs...

      The problem was that when he lost his job, he could have gone to child support enforcement to make an official request to have the order modified, so that no arrears would have occurred. They are required to help.

      http://ChildSupportRights.org

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      @anonymous: He has to pay until he has paid the amount he is in arrears. One can liken it to any debt: If you owe $1000 for a fridge, lose your job and stop making payments when you have only paid $400 -- well, you still owe $600 even if you no longer have the fridge. Your husband's child may be 19, but your husband did not pay the amount he was obliged to pay during the 18 years he was expected to make payments. Therefore, he still owes the amount that has not been paid just like in the fridge comparison. Further, the reason the child in your husband's case not living with his mother/payee doesn't matter is that she had custody of and supported the child until he was 18 and that is the only time frame the court is interested in. The debt does not go away simply because the child moves out of his mother's house or reaches his 18th birthday the same way the debt one owes for that fridge doesn't go away if you no longer have the fridge or it's an old fridge. Hope this helps.

    • profile image
      Author

      George McCasland 4 years ago

      @anonymous: Not this report on the subject.....http://aspe.hhs.gov/hsp/07/assessing-CS-debt/execs... needs to file a motion with the court to have child support interest penalties set aside, and for 100% payments made be applied to any arrears. This could end up with an overpayment, but don't expect any recovery. Consider joining Dads House and help to teach other on these subjects.

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      My finace's son just turned 21 and we are still paying over $700.00 a month in child support. His son has not lived with his mother since he was 15, but she continues to receive money to support him, even though he works and is able of supporting himself. I understand that we are still paying because of arrears from several years ago, but only recently found out that interest in the amount of 12% per year was accrued on the balance. WTH!!! The "custodial parent" is not a bank, why should she receive that additional money?

      Do we have any recourse in getting his child support lowered? Paid directly to his son, since he is a grown man and should be allowed access to money that is supposed to be helping support him?

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      George McCasland 4 years ago

      @anonymous: If you go to the top of the article, you will see a link to an article on the subject of jurisdiction.

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      When neither parent lives in the same state, which state laws regarding child support apply? The state of the parent who pays child support or the state of the parent who receives it?

    • JackieN0130 profile image

      JackieN0130 4 years ago

      @anonymous: Because at 18 you are not legally obligated to support your son or allow him to live in your home. It is nice that you do this for him, but you do not have to legally. You have the choice whether to support him or not. His father has the same choice.

      PS: My parents (happily married) stopped supporting me at 18 because they thought I was irresponsible (they were right). I am so glad they did! My years of struggling to afford ramen noodles tought me responsibility and not to take my parents for granted and I am better off for it today at age 45. Some kids need that lesson. Others don't.

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      My husband's child is 19(this past July 2012). He is still paying child support although Michigan law says you pay until the child is 18. My husband does have arrears,but I mean at what point does he stop being "obligated" to pay anymore??? The child does not even live with the "payee"/mother. This confuses me. And trying to talk to someone at Oakland County FOC in Michigan is a lost cause,we have tried unsuccessfully on several occasion to get answers with no luck. Truly frustrating. My husband has never tried to skip out on paying, he did lose his job at one point years ago,hence the arrears.

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      George McCasland 4 years ago

      @laloca29: No, that leaves the obligor open to be scammed. It makes it easy to go to multiple states to file claims of non-support. These states do not check with the home state, or the obligor, before taking action. The only protection if being able to show a printout from the courts of what has been paid, but in the meantime, all assets and accounts may have been frozen and/or drained. I have an Arizona father who is was hit by five claims on the same child, from five different states, while he was current in child support in AZ.

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      laloca29 4 years ago

      Couldn't've just done a direct pay? That would have saved you time and money.

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      Support in NY needs to end at 18 its ridiculous that someone considered Ann adult still needs support. At age 18 no one has custody of that person therefore of the child still lives st home with mommy he or she better get a job and learn responsibility instead of learning to be a mooch like their mother was.

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      George McCasland 4 years ago

      @anonymous: Because New York still retains jurisdiction, since neither of them has transfer it to the state of residence of the child. Contact the county courthouse where they live and transfer jurisdiction.

      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xM8q0m2CmDg&amp...

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      anonymous 4 years ago

      why does my husband have to pay child support until 21 if he or the custodial parent no longer resides in new york???????

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      anonymous 5 years ago

      @George McCasland: Dont use child support enforcement paid directly to the other parent

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      anonymous 5 years ago

      @anonymous: Women need to do the same thing, stop balking @ maintaining your childs needs b/c you think your gender excuses you.

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      anonymous 5 years ago

      @anonymous: Food For The ENTITLED Brain and Their Enablers:

      Many generations of (adults) people went to college without daddy's child support!!! I know I did! Kids absolutely must be taught the reality of life and that it's a tough world and it takes a lot hard work to make something out of your self. In fact, I started babysitting at 10 years old, plus, worked all through high school and college. Unfortunately, a part of society has created a monster called the "Entitlement Generation." Sadly, there are people always with their hand, whining wanting more, more, never satisfied or happy, and blaming their problems on everyone else. I was a single mother of two and received zero child support. Yes, there is no doubt it would have been awesome to receive financial help from their dead-beat father! Times were really tough for us! However, not once did I sit around with my hand out waiting for someone to help me. I had pride, wore my big-girl panties, worked extremely hard and did extra jobs to make ends meet. For this reason, it really... bugs me when women frivolously ramble on and on about what is just normal stuff that everyone else has to do. Unless a child is disabled, the law is what it is. If it's 18 in your state, too bad, go vent to your representative or a blog that is sympathetic to people feeling entitled. Your cash-cow is dry! The answer is very simple, do what I did, offer to help pay off your children's student loans when they finish. Your kid needs to get a job, get the work experience and learn a some pride. Really, I assure you, it gives a person incintive flipping burgers. Quickly, they will realize they don't want to it the rest of their life. In return, working harder to getting a trade or a degree! Unless you are born with a silver spoon in your mouth, this is what people do, work their way through college. Or, maybe if the kid ask daddy really nice, ((not expect it)), maybe he'll help out if he can. Just be thankful, not greedy!!! A great quote:::

      âJudge your success by what you had to give up in order to get it.â

      â Dalai Lama XIV

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      anonymous 5 years ago

      interesting lens

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      anonymous 5 years ago

      @anonymous: Hes 18 years old. I started working when I was 16. Joined the navy when i was 19. Stop making excuses for your child. Children these days are lazy because their parents enable them to be. Turn off the TV and the video games and go to work. My son is 18, just graduated highschool and is now working full time at Publix making good steady money. Why? Because I taught him to be a hard worker and that you must work to survive, especially during hard times like these.....I'm a disabled veteran who lives off of an income of $667.00 per month and pay $412.00 a month in child support. The only reason I'm not living on the streets is because of some dear friends of mine who took me in. I don't understand people who don't teach their children the basics of survival. You turn 18, you're old enough to die for your country....old enough to vote....damn sure old enough to go get a damn job and start earning a living.........

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      Author

      George McCasland 5 years ago

      @anonymous: You didn't read the article? It says to first contact child support enforcement and make an official request.

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      anonymous 5 years ago

      Does the non custodial parent have to summit a request to the courts to end child support once the child turns of legal age in Virginia?

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      anonymous 5 years ago

      Kids cost money! Insurance premiums through employers are expensive. Without it it's more expensive. Kids get sick no matter the age. Need medication hospitalization. They use a lot of electricity. Leave lights on doors open. Break things, go through more clothes, shoes, socks, haircuts, dental visits, always need something or want something. Eat a lot. Spill a lot. Cleaners and cleaning costs. Always a ton of laundry to do. Messes to clean. Need help with homework need home work aids. Mothers don't stop! Did your mother, think back growing up. Did you wife stop when you were married? She is always the first one up and the last one to sit down for a break. Child support is to ensure that child has a roof over its head and all it needs to survive and do well in school. Once that is taken care of most of us then look to what extras can we afford?! Would you help your child survive if they paid rent electric water food phones cable internet clothing educational needs if they lived anywhere else on their own?! If you answered yes then get over the anger at the divorcee and help your child stay growing up in the manner it has been accustomed to. No parent should get a piece of paper to walk out on their kids needs. Mothers are not asking for a paper so they can run off and spoil their own desires. Why would any man be in a hurry to stop providing a roof over their child's head, as that is what the support is for, and be in such a hurry to run off and spend it on themselves or another woman, and/or woman and her kids. Maybe that is why fathers have that as men are in such a hurry to keep their money stop supporting their children because they view it as a waste of their money and it's better spend on their own needs and desires than helping take care of their kids as long as the kids depend on a parent for assistance. Maybe more men should think how would they feel if they were the confused 18 yr old and unsure about their future and their father was in a hurry to stop helping their mother provide a roof over there head and run off with his money n do what he wants n quit worrying about him (the kid and his mother) maybe if fathers looked at it for what it is and not all about getting away from your ex wife. No matter how you look at it less money means a tighter budget and the kids are going to get told no more. It's inevitable. So you got divorced. Things didn't work out. It's ok. It doesn't have to be fighting and faults. No two people get along forever kids need both parents and both should work towards what's best for their kids no matter where they live they should have their needs met and a loving home to grow in until their ready to fly. It is a choice. Choose to stand by your kids no matter the age as long as they need you just as you wanted your own father to do for you.

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      anonymous 5 years ago

      Why is it ok for men to stop supporting children at 18 period if the child still lives at home? College is expensive and what 18 year old has the job to pay for it? If we want our kids to do better than us, get a good education and a good job and live a better life then we did which is most parents dreams, it costs money to continue to provide for our kids. Most mothers do not get a pay increase because their child turns 18 and support stops. My mother did not kick me out at 18, and I had no idea what I wanted to do with my life. She was struggling to support me on her own already which I knew. I had no work experience to get a decent job and help her support me, working at fast food places on minimum wage barely provided enough for me to pay for my own car insurance and gas. I know there is financial aid at colleges and how many wind up taking years to pay off a good education? Let alone a superb one! Scholarships are the only save all but they're not enough to go around for every child and those who do mediocre in school don't receive those. I am a single mother on social security disability my son just graduated high school and was lucky he maintained an A average is smart taking advanced courses throughout and got the scholarship. I pray my daughter will. Bottom line I don't make enough to support myself this day in age on social security with a back injury. Let alone myself and 2 kids. My son is living at home and going to college and his father is stopping child support. His child support was never calculated on income when we divorced my son was 5. He quit his stable job wasn't making ends meet so I settled for a less amount of only what he could afford and helped with insurance which was his as part of the divorce. Now at 18 when I am not making ends meet and just want to support us in the same poor manner which i have been and am losing my house, he is not returning the favor and I have to ask my son to help pay the bills. Just because my son has turned 18, his needs to survive have not stopped! I am not getting rich off child support. I don't feel any mother is. I don't know why fathers think they are wasting money. Even when I was working I have always done for my kids not myself. Both have more at my home then they have at their fathers which stems from when I was working. Kids cost a lot of money. You can't take them into a store without the I wants! I think most mothers who love their kids just want to continue supporting them in the same manner they have been accustomed to. It is the kids that suffer when the income goes down. It would if you stayed married and had a reduction of your incomes by that amount. Something has to go. I don't have any extras only living expenses so now my sons father has stopped the first thing to go is what we need the least, do I have to get rid of television and Internet. As I am out of options. Maybe some mothers have more or can get a second job. But bottom line if it's the kids whom are getting spoiled which most parents do these days and money coming in stops, it is the kids that suffer and most moms don't kick their children out when they turn 18 and the kids still need all the living expenses and extras they don't just cease and we watch the fathers go on vacations etc now they aren't providing help. How is this fair? I doubt fathers if living in the home still would cut off support and kick them out so why do they get that break if their not living in the home and the mothers get stuck all alone. I don't care what hovel I have to life in, I will do for my children for life. All parents should have the same mentality. They're our children. There is enough pressure on kids these days and they all don't mature to the ability to support themselves at the same rate. The laws should read until the child reaches the mature age of the ability to support themselves in a decent manner, not eating romaine noodles all week, that both parents will support the child in an equal fashion according to their income. Why should only kids whose parents remain marriage past high school graduation get that love and support they need they should look forward to graduation and high school and the freedom to discover theirselves and grow up not there be turmoil in the home because now the income changes and it's a struggle to figure out how your going to make ends meet. How do you think the child feels when that happens to their mothers? What do you think they think of their fathers for uprooting their lives when they turn 18. Truth is we're most all living paycheck to paycheck and not rich. Food for thought.

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      anonymous 5 years ago

      @anonymous: How well do you expect your daughter will do finishing high school without the support you provide? Do you think she will finish school if the circumstances at home are worse off then they already are? Is it about supporting your daughter or getting even with your wife? The way parents fight with each other and the father walking away from a daughter hurts. My father left when I was 15 and divorced me also. Was not around for me as he was during their marriage. It took me longer to grow up and my school suffered I dropped out shortly after he left home, when he was home I did my best in school trying to make him proud of me. Maybe you should look at your relationship maybe it's not your wife's fault maybe your daughter is doing poorly as she is hurting over the way the parents are acting. So many parents fight and try to get even with each other and spend more time trying to hurt one another then get along. That was the case with my parents I didn't know how to cope and spent many years doing the wrong things to get back at their behavior and make them stop. A child loves both their mother and father equally and can't pick just one. It hurts us when one parent attacks the other. It makes us question our own identity. I am 43, it took me half my life to quit hating men as my father walked out and wasn't there to support me when I got into trouble or blamed my mother when I was really being bad to get his attention or make him see I was hurting that he divorced me also. I finally got over it but I was 30 and went to counseling. The things you are doing and have got your daughter into this predictiment it's going to take a loving environment from you both to help her straighten out. I don't feel taking your support from her and making her home life more of a struggle is going to have a positive outcome for her future. If you care, be there for her as long as she needs it, even if it's through college. Taking from her isn't the answer. It's a pay back at your wife.

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      Author

      George McCasland 5 years ago

      @anonymous: Case law and written law for most states, that do not have the provisions for child support through college, sets a limit of age 19, but Washington does have that provision. You would need to find case law in this regard for your state to determine if there have been other rulings in your favor.

      http://library.lawschool.cornell.edu/

    • TwistedWiseman profile image

      TwistedWiseman 5 years ago

      I have lived a life of a loveless marriage and I don't wish it to anyone.

      Growing up in that kind of environment is not pleasant.

      I am writing a lens about it, full story there.

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      anonymous 5 years ago

      @anonymous: Please tell me, how did this turn out for you? I'm confidant I'm in a very similar situation...

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      anonymous 5 years ago

      I am the non-custodial parent & my daughter is just turning 16. She was not officially held back, but only earned 1 credit in this, her freshman year of highschool. She was already held back once in third grade. At this rate she will be 3 weeks short of 20 years old if she manages to pass the next 4 years of high school without incident. I have tried to talk some sense into her mother about sending her to summer school or hiring/finding a tutor, but to no avail. Her plan is to either find an easier school for her to attend, to put her into an 'alternative schiool', or to let her attend online high school classes which are available here in Washington state. She has 3 other sisters by 2 different fathers who's joint household contribution is $25 per month. Between direct support and full insurance I'm paying $700 for just my child knowing full well that I am supporting the other children in the household as well. Since my wishes regarding her schooling are not being taken into consideration, I would like to motion that my support end at 18, however I have no idea what I see as valid extenuating circumstances will be viewed as legally. Do you have any general advice?

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      Author

      George McCasland 5 years ago

      @anonymous: Go to child support enforcement and make an official request for order to be modified for the money to go to the child, which could have been done when he turned age 18.

      Is she paying for his schooling, and if not, is she providing her portion of the child support obligation to the child?

      The Missouri guidelines take into account the incomes of both parents, which means that she is supposed to be provide him with her portion of her income. Though I do not know anyone who has tried it, ask child support enforcement to file a motion to enforce her obligation to the child. If you can, record their response, I would like to hear what they say. You may need to actually file a motion to enforce, which would be done pro per using forms from the Clerk of the Court.

      This could make for an interesting case. Come to Dads House for us to further discuss this.

      http://www.facebook.com/DadsHouseEdCenter

      http://www.facebook.com/groups/Mo.DadsHouseEdCtr/

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      anonymous 5 years ago

      What should be done if the young man is now 19 getting ready to turn 20 in a few months and is in his second semester of college, which first semester consisted of only 3 credit hours, does not live at home and hasn't since the beginning of his senior year of high school because the custodial parent moved from Missouri to Kentucky and he stayed behind living with friends to finish his senior year. The non custodial parent lives over 100 miles away, that's why he did not live with him during that time. He is still only taking 4 credit hous and somehow was able qualify for financial aid, which means he must not be showing any type of support from the custodial parent. The custodial parents household makes over a hundred thousand a year. The financial aid papers are in his name only. The non custodial parent has paid child support for the last 15 years on time through the state plus has always paid extra for car insurance, school,special events,clothes and bought first car, which was not required. I believe even though he is only 19 the support that's being sent to the custodial parent should stop. Now let the non custodial decide how the money is spent because you see what is being sent to the custodial parent isn't always being spent on the 19 year old. What do you think am I wrong for feeling this would be fair?

    • JJNW profile image

      JJNW 5 years ago from USA

      As a mom, I plan on supporting my children throughout their lives...because I love them.

    • LewesDE profile image

      LewesDE 5 years ago

      Awesome lens!

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      anonymous 5 years ago

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    • Tammylove profile image

      Tammylove 6 years ago

      Child support is a problem regardless of which side you are on. As a mother raising 3 children alone... the state had problems sending me money they collected, they sent me another persons check, and they kept funds that should've been sent to me claiming the computer agreed with me but the worker didn't so my case was sent for "special audit" and I never collected my money. And as a friend to many father's paying child support to others, I have seen the state keep funds for a child that wasn't the father's child and the couple was never married. I've seen the state refuse to take funds being paid by the father because he didn't go in with the money himself because he was at work and sent his friend to the office for him, and I have seen the state do all kinds of crazy things with child support. I could go on for hours. The entire program...and their employees new revamped!!! For all concerned!!!