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Who says There's a "Weaker Sex?"

Updated on August 11, 2015

Battle of the Sexes

The issue of which gender is dominant or submissive has raged in one form or another since the dawn of time. The answer depends on several factors. Some of in which culture and religious sects are a major factor.

For example, in the western hemisphere the Judeo-Christian religions play an important part as to how women are viewed in society. The same is true of main line eastern religions. You’ll notice in both, women have been assigned what appears to be a less than equal position in society. This is especially true in eastern cultures where women are sometimes viewed as next to worthless.

However, in contrast, western society largely takes its’ cue from Judeo-Christian marriage values. Christian scriptures designate women as “the weaker vessel”. But reading all scriptures in their entire context further explains if both sexes are fulfilling their roles as outlined, they will become one in unity, the way God designed.

In today’s’ modern world this notion is sometimes deemed archaic, outdated, old fashioned and beside the point. To many, the bible of Christianity has become nothing more than a collection of fairy tales. And many women have rejected any ideas of themselves being less in any way, fashion or form. They want equality.

Furthermore, women can’t be blamed for their opinions on this sensitive subject. Many men haven’t followed rules outlined in the bible and abused their positions as “head” of the home, which has led to the crumbling of countless relationships. On the other hand, many men hold to their sacred values…and women go their own way anyhow. So, in a lot of instances, a man or woman’s position can be attributed largely to their own actions and value systems.

In the early 1970’s, the women’s liberation movement began, demanding full equality of the sexes. This movement, egged on by such illustrious groups as the National Organization of Women (NOW), caught most men completely off guard. They were not prepared to deal with this new concept. There were two groups of men involved… those who thought the idea ludicrous and the innocent. Yes, the innocent.

These were males who played by the established “rules” and had never entertained a concept of women as being less in any manner. They got caught in the middle so to speak. For instance, what of the unassuming, mild mannered guy working next to a newly “liberated” woman? You know, the gentleman who always politely opened doors, graciously paid for meals and so on, just as his mother had raised him to do. Suddenly he became a “male chauvinist” and guilty of the unpardonable sin of trying to be nice. He couldn’t win for losing.

Now, what were the two groups of women? There were those who were satisfied with the status quo preferring to be a proper homemaker, mother and part of the traditional equation…and overzealous women who take any approach or overture by a male, whether real or perceived, as a personal affront to their status as an equal. There is usually no middle ground between the two.

The fallout from these battles many times ends in divorce or breaking up of a relationship. Who is to blame? The people involved more often than not. The question of “who was going to wear the pants” should have been addressed long before committing to any serious affiliation.

In conclusion, we are still faced with the issue of who is the weaker sex and why women desire equality with men. So here’s the truth of the matter.

Most men wonder why women want to be equal with them… they can’t understand why women want to give up so much power!

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    • nidhi.singh profile image

      Nidhi Singh 

      7 years ago from Austin

      very true! love this article!

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