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Taiwan Marriage for Foreigners

Updated on May 23, 2012

The purpose of this lens is to help international couples in Taiwan navigate the process of achieving resident status for the non-Taiwanese spouse. 

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My Story

My wife and I met while we were attending college in the United States and married just before my graduation. Not too long after our marriage, we moved to Taiwan. At the time, we were not planning living in Taiwan for more than a year and I wouldn’t be able to work legally in Taiwan solely on the basis of residency based upon our marriage. Therefore, instead of pursuing Taiwanese residency through our marriage, I obtained my Alien Residence Certificate (ARC) and work permit through the school where I was hired to teach English.

After about a year in Taiwan, we moved back to the United States to obtain advanced degrees. We finished graduate school and pursued our careers in the United States. My wife became a United States citizen, and now has dual citizenship. We recently decided to have our first child and once we received the good news, we quit our jobs and moved to Taiwan to enjoy the lower cost of living, which allows us both to not work for an extended period of time.

Because we decided not to work, at least not full time, obtaining an ARC through employment was not an option. Similarly, I did not want to attend school full-time for the same reason I did not want to work full time, so I wasn’t going to get an ARC through a school. Leaving the country every month or so on a “visa run” wasn’t practical for our situation. Moreover, if I decided to work part-time, I wanted to do so legally.

Thankfully, Taiwan changed its immigration laws a number of years ago allowing resident foreigners married to Taiwanese citizens to work legally in Taiwan. Permission to work legally in Taiwan was automatically granted upon receipt of the ARC; there is not a separate application process for a work permit.

Unfortunately, although the Taiwan government has been increasing the quantity and quality of English materials on-line and in print, figuring out the process for obtaining resident status was more confusing than I thought it should be. The purpose of this lens to help step you through the process and to collect in one place the on-line resources you will need or find helpful.

I hope that you find this site useful and I wish you happiness and success in your endeavors.

Overview of the Process - The Basic Steps of Acquiring Resident Status Through Marriage in Taiwan

The steps do not necessarily have to be done in this exact order. The sections below will discuss where one step is a prerequisite for another.

  1. Deciding where to get married.
  2. Tieing the knot, getting your marriage certificate, and getting it authenticated.
  3. Getting your Certificate of no Criminal Record (a/k/a Certificate of Good Conduct)
  4. Getting your Health Certificate and having it authenticated
  5. Getting your name added to your Taiwanese spouse's Household Registration
  6. Getting your Joining Family Resident Visa
  7. Getting your Alien Resident Certificate (ARC)
  8. Renewing your ARC

Steps 1 & 2: Marriage

Deciding where to get married, getting married, and making it all official

To avoid some of the relatively minor headaches that my wife and I experienced, it is best if you familiarize yourself with the regulations governing foreign residents before you get married and carefully coordinate your wedding and the subsequent steps you'll need to take if you want to legally live and work in Taiwan. For example, when my wife and I married, we did not register our marriage in Taiwan and therefore had to pay a modest fine when, nearly a decade after the fact, my wife added me to her household registration (see the section on household registration, below). Also, many of the documents you must acquire, such as the health certificate and certificate of no criminal record, are only accepted within a certain time period after they were issued. If you don't time things right, you might incur addition cost and inconvenience retracing your steps.

If you are married in Taiwan, you will still need to register your marriage in your home country and provide proof of this for household registration purposes. Contact the embasy, counsulate, or other representative office of your country in Taiwan about how to do this.

If you are married in your home country, be sure to obtain several certified copies of your marriage certificate. You will also need to translate it into Chinese and have it authenticated by Taiwanese Representative with jurisdiction over the locale where you registered your marriage. See section four on Household Registration, below, for more information.

NOTE: The Taiwanese spouse should proof-read a non-Chinese marriage certificate carefully to make sure that the spelling of the transliterated name on the marriage certificate matches that on the Taiwanese passport EXACTLY. If you are starting this process long after your marriage and find a discrepancy, you will mostly likely (in the USA) need to file for an amendment to your marriage certificate. In New York City, this cost $40. You can get the form and instructions from the NYC Marriage Bureau Website.

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Step 3. Certificate of No Criminal Record

Learn from me, start this step as early as possible!

To apply for a resident visa, Taiwan requires that the foreign spouse submit documentation proving a clean criminal record. A variety of terms is used to refer to this documentation in official instructions. You will also find foreigners who have gone through the process using a variety of terms for this documentation. This may be due in part to differences in translation, but mostly due to the fact that the terms used for such documentation and the agencies and procedures vary from country to country. In the United States the terms, agencies, and procedures vary from state to state.

Some of the more common terms I've come across: "certificate of clean criminal record", "certificate of good conduct", "certificate of clean hands record", "police clearance certificate", and "clean criminal record documentation."

When I first read the instruction on the visa application asking for this documentation, I checked out several discussion boards and Web sites to see how other Americans have gone about acquiring these records. A common procedure that I read about was to contact the "Department of Criminal Investigation" or its counterpart in the American spouse's state capital.

I was a resident of New York at the time and I called the New York City information line (311) and was told that I could get a "Personal Criminal History Record Review" from the Division of Criminal Justice Services (DCJS) in Albany. I called the DCJS and they mailed the application packet to me, which I received in just under a week. The application packet included a fingerprinting card, which I was instructed to bring to my local police station to have my fingerprints taken. So far, this all seemed to be in line with what I've read about the process from other Americans who have gone through the process.

I went to my neighborhood police precinct the next afternoon, but was informed that they only offer fingerprinting services between the hours of 10:00 a.m. and noon. When I returned the next morning, I was asked why I was requesting my criminal record and after I explained it was for foreign visa purposes, I was told that a Personal Criminal History Record Review from the DCJS could not be used for that purpose and that what I needed was a "Certificate of Good Conduct," which I had to get from the Public Inquiry & Request Section at New York City Police Department Headquarters in Manhattan.

(Continued below.)

Step 3. Certificate of No Criminal Record, Continued

Apply early and have the certificate authenticated.

I visited the NYPD website for more information and called NYPD HQ to find out the hours and verify the fee ($30 a/o July 2006) and required documents. As I was a resident of NYC, I had to apply in person. Non-residents may apply by mail. It took a while to pass through the security checks at police headquarters and the Public Inquiries and Request Section office was crammed full of people. I assume that you would want to set aside a couple hours at similar agencies in most large cities if you can not order this record by mail.

I had to wait ten days from the time I applied and was finger printed until I could pick up the Certificate of Good Conduct. The delay caused by initially requesting forms from the wrong agency and the further wait after applying to the appropriate agency caused me to postpone my move date. Luckily, I planned to visit with my parents before flying to Taiwan, so I didn't have to change my flight, but I did have to cut my visit with my parents short.

In hindsight, I should have applied for the Certificate of Good Conduct a couple months in advance. I recommend starting this process as soon as you know that you are getting married and applying for residency, but not too early. The Certificate of Good Conduct has to have been issued no more than three months prior to the time you apply for your visa.

If you are a New York City resident, or are just curious, the Web site containing the information you need to obtain a Certificate of Good Conduct is: http://www.nyc.gov/html/nypd/html/ssb/public.html

Once you have your Certificate of Good Conduct, you have to have it authenticated at the ROC Representative Office nearest your home. In the United States this office is known as the Taiwan Economic and Cultural Organization. There is a $15 fee and the application form is available at any TECO office or you can download it from the official Website: http://www.tecro.org/content.php?section=visas

Note, I've read other sources that have stated that you must also provide a Chinese translation of the Certificate of Good Conduct. I did not provide a translation and the TECO office in New York authenticated the document and accepted it with my visa application, with no objections.

Step 4. Health Certificate

Obtaining a health certificate is relatively straight-forward and as long as you don't have a communicable diseases, you shouldn't have a problem.

You can have the examination for the health certificate performed in a either a designated hospital in Taiwan or a licensed hospital or clinic in you home country.

Since I was in the United States, I simply went to my personal care physician who arranged for the appropriate tests and completed the form.

The form is in both Chinese and English, so there is no need to translate it. But if the form was completed by a foreign hospital or clinic, it must be authenticated by the ROC Embassy, Consulate or Mission, which has jurisdiction over the place where the documents are issued.

My physician did not sign the form before a public notary, so the TECO in New York would not accept it. Because requiring the doctor to sign before a notary public is an inconvenience in the United States, however, TECO will accept a health certificate that has not been notarized if it is sealed in the clinic's envelope with the doctor's signature across the seal. So I simply brought the form back to my doctor who put it in his office's pre-printed envelope and signed the seal.

The certificate is good for three months.

You can download an English/Chinese Health Certificate form here: http://www.tecochicago.org/visa/health.pdf

Step 5. Household Registration

Getting yourself added to your Taiwanese spouse's household registration.

In Taiwan household registration records serve a purpose similar to birth, marriage, and death certificates in the United States. They contain entries regarding, and are considered prima facie evidence of: birth, death, marriage, and divorce.

To add you to his Household Registration, your Taiwanese spouse will need to bring the following items to the local Household Registration Office:

  1. A copy of his Household Registration

  2. His chop (a unique stamp used as signatures in Taiwan)

  3. His ROC ID card

  4. A copy of your marriage certificate, translated into Chinese, and authenticated by the ROC Representative Office nearest your home.

  5. A few hundred NT dollars for the fees. The fees are relatively inexpensive. A schedule of fees is available here: http://english.taipei.gov.tw/dahr/index.jsp?recordid=5536

In our case, we no longer had the original copy of our marriage certificate, only photocopies. So I ordered several certified copies from the Vital Records office of the county in which we were married.

Also, since the state that we were married in is not in the TECO New York branch's jurisdication, we had to have another regional branch authenticate the document. We express mailed to the appropriate TECO branch the certified marriage certificate, along with a Chinese translation; a completed application for document authentication; the application fee ($15); and a self-addressed, postage-paid Fed Ex envelop for them to return the authenticated document back to us.

Note: my wife translated the marriage certificate into Chinese herself, which was recommended and accepted by the authenticating TECO branch. I've read about other couples paying translation services, but my wife translated all documents herself, which saved us time and money.

I had my wife obtain several stamped copies of the updated Household Registration. My wife was already in Taiwan during this time, so she kept a few copies and express mailed a few copies of the to me in New York.

She didn't mail the authenticated and translated copy of our marriage certificate back, which I thought was required for the visa application, so I had her express mail it back to me. It turns out the the Household Registration is all that is required. TECO NY had no interest in seeing my marriage certificate and immediately returned it when I submitted my visa ap

Step 6. Alien Resident Certificate

The Light at the End of the Tunnel

Under the "Remarks" section of my resident visa is the instruction: "APPLY FOR ARC AT POLICE BUREAU WITHIN 15 DAYS."

So a couple days after arriving in Taiwan, my wife and I went to the Foreign Affairs office at the local police bureau. I brought copies of all documentation, just in case.

Basically, we had to fill out an application, pay a fee in the amount of $1,000 NT (about $30 USD), provide a 2"x2" photo, show my passport, and my wife's household registration.

I was able to pick up my Alien Resident Certificate (which as a side note is green, unlike the United State's "green card").

Now I can work legally in Taiwan and can leave and re-enter the country at will. This first ARC will expire in a year, but I can reapply for a three-year ARC at that time.

Step 7. Renewing your ARC

Wow! It's been a year since I created this lens. Anyway, I just renewed my ARC. Simple process. You'll need your passport w/ visa, photos, and a CURRENT copy of your household registration (don't use one from a year ago if you had extra copies). You just have to fill out some forms. It was simple and quick. Now I don't have to worry about visas for three years. Nice!

Necessary and Helpful Links

The following is a list of links to website you will need or will want to visit as you proceed through the resident visa and Alien Resident Certificate application process. Some of the sites you will need to visit, other are site I feel are particularly useful. You should visit these sites as soon as possible in the process; preferably before you marry.

Please take a moment to share your impression of this lens and any additional information you might have on this topic.

Reader Feedback

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    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      Is there some way to know if my husband file divorce in taiwan im now in phil.

    • profile image

      anonymous 4 years ago

      Helpful!!!Xiexie^^

    • profile image

      Idriss 5 years ago

      Hi my name is idriss and i am a moroccain guy !! I have a taiwanese girlfriend and we will get marry soon !! i want to know what should i exactly prepare ( documents ) for the marriage in taiwan :))

      thanks for replying

    • profile image

      anonymous 5 years ago

      Hi !! i am a morroccain guy and i have a taiwanese girlfriend and we will get marry soon !! i hope i can get some help from you.. i want to know what should i exactly bring from my country ( documents) ??

    • profile image

      anonymous 5 years ago

      I am a morrocan and i have a taiwanese girlfriend and we will get marry soon but i want to ask what should i exactly bring from my country (documents ) and is it possible to get marry in hong kong first then move to taiwan because i have to apply the taiwanese visa from hong kong or can i just apply the visa in hong kong then move to taiwan to get marry and apply the resident visa ?? thank you for replying

    • profile image

      anonymous 5 years ago

      Thanks so much for the post--really helpful.

    • profile image

      anonymous 5 years ago

      Thanks a lot for this! I'm in a not-so similar situation, I married to my Taiwanese 4 years ago here in the US, nevertheless I'm have Mexican citizenship, we are planning on moving to Taiwan in a couple of months but I want to go back to my home country to get this "Criminal record" thing since apparently it can only be done in person, I'm planning in going and get all my documentation authenticated here since after I leave the US I won't be able to reentry, I also have a question for you that have me very puzzled, we had a baby girl born here, so she have an american Passport, how does that works? I heard that she only needs her immunization card translated (authenticated perhaps) also in the Teco back in Mexico there's not any information about Resident visa but Visiting visa only (I'll call them Monday tho), so I was thinking that perhaps I should only get that visa but have all the other paperwork ready to apply for residence in the island. Also I don think my wife have any "Household Registration" since we've been in the US the last 4 years. I'm trying very hard to be aware of making all this in a timely manner since I don't want to spend any travel money in stuff that I could have done before, I mean right now.

    • ChouDoufu profile image
      Author

      ChouDoufu 5 years ago

      @anonymous: Glad you have found it help. Please note that I've not updated this lens in a few years, so do be sure to check official sources.

    • profile image

      anonymous 5 years ago

      glad I found this page as I'm planning on getting married to a Taiwanese woman and relocate from the UK. Thanks again.

    • profile image

      anonymous 5 years ago

      Hi, I've been married to my Taiwanese wife for 11+ years. We were married in India and I can't seem to find the paper and it wasn't very impressive from a legal point of view - would've been difficult to authenticate. Recently, we began discussing the possibility of living inTaiwan. We also have an 8 year old daughter (born in U.S.). Do you have any suggestions regarding proof of marriage. We've been paying taxes, filing as married since 2002 in U.S. so I could make copies of that, joint bank accounts, etc. Do you think that will be sufficient, or would we need to get married all over again? Thanks!

    • profile image

      anonymous 5 years ago

      Thanks for this post. I'm American and am going to get married to a Taiwanese girl soon. Thanks for your generous details of the process. It's a daunting prospect but you have helped me know where to get started.

    • profile image

      anonymous 5 years ago

      @anonymous: So you intend to find just any girl and marry her?

    • profile image

      anonymous 5 years ago

      @jjm79kid: No, deportation under the reason you stated, means you cannot return.

    • profile image

      anonymous 5 years ago

      Thank you! This is very thorough and helpful!

    • profile image

      anonymous 5 years ago

      Thank you! This is very thorough and helpful!

    • profile image

      jjm79kid 6 years ago

      I am married to a Taiwanese and have lived in Taiwan for 24 years. My ARC had expired. I also have been charged in court for Drink Driving, did my prison time in default of a fine, and deported. Am I allowed to return to Taiwan?

    • profile image

      anonymous 6 years ago

      Very Helpful Site!!!! It's give the detail procedures. I just got married with my Taiwanese wife. This just made it very simple what to do nextt!!!! Cheers.

    • profile image

      anonymous 6 years ago

      Interesting article. I'm a Canadian citizen in Taiwan and I myself plan to marry a Taiwanese girl soon, so the exact step by step procedure of the entire process would be very helpful. Can anyone elighten me?

    • profile image

      anonymous 6 years ago

      BRILLIANT!! This is excellent. Many thanks....

    • profile image

      anonymous 6 years ago

      thank you so much for this ... i will be relocating and marrying taipei from NYC

      this has helped so much... i have completed all i need to do i nyc now just the TPE leg of this instructions.

    • profile image

      anonymous 6 years ago

      Thanks for the wealth of info.

    • profile image

      anonymous 6 years ago

      Excellent informations!!! This is exactly what I need. Thanks you very very very much!!!

    • profile image

      fm202 7 years ago

      I am going to get marry with my Taiwanese girlfriend, May I have some Information about:

      1. Is Taiwan Government accepting Dual citizenship?

      2. Hw long is Permanent Residence Period?

      3. How long will it take time to get Taiwanese passport?

      Regards,

      Farhad.

    • profile image

      anonymous 7 years ago

      Great - This will work for me. I met my wife in UK 5 years ago and we married in TW in 2007. We have lived in UK since but will move to Taipei in September. Thanks for doing this. Only difference was that it is called clean 'criminal record certificate' in UK. - Thanks again.

    • profile image

      anonymous 7 years ago

      Your site and the links you provide are very helpful. I have been married to a Taiwanese for the last five years, and we have been living together outside of Taiwan for that time. My wife and I returned to Taiwan last December, and I have just recently obtained my ARC. The big question we had in our minds was whether or not I could work legally. I am happy to learn that I can. I guess now that I will have to read further to find out how to pay taxes and such. Thanks. Paul

    • ChouDoufu profile image
      Author

      ChouDoufu 7 years ago

      [in reply to Keith] I don't get your point. Of course my marriage wasn't recognized in Taiwan until registered there, a process that was easy in comparison to what the US Dept. of Homeland Security will put foreign-married couples through. As for being "sinicized," again, what is your point? Do you find something sinister in the fact that Taiwan household registrations don't accept non-Chinese? Should U.S. marriage certificates accept names in scripts other than the Latin alphabet? There is an inevitable about of Anglicization in the process of becoming a legal resident of the United States. Similarly, there is an inevitable amount of Sinicization in the process of becoming a legal resident of Taiwan.

      Please specify, exactly, how I'm misinformed. If I have misstated something, I would certainly like to correct it.

    • profile image

      anonymous 7 years ago

      To Step 5: Household Registration

      Dude, you seem misinformed about marriage in China. Sorry, but let me explain:

      I.

      First, your wife wasn't married. Not to you, I mean. For ten years, you thought that she was your wife, but not so in the Chinese world, my friend. Unless she registers you in her Household Registration, she is not married by law. She knew that, her parents knew that. Congratulations, but you were happy, right?

      It turned out lucky. After ten years she probably felt too old to be unmarried, so decided to get you closer to her family and register your 'phony marriage' for real in Taiwan. After all, her poor man need a visa, right?

      II.

      Now, she is married to you. Did you read what you signed? Foreigners must be sinicized in Chinese Household Registers. They probably lulled you into using your Chinese pet name, right? And your child must have a Chinese name, too. That cannot be changed, ever, my man. You were siniziced. It's official history now. Good luck!

    • profile image

      anonymous 7 years ago

      Can my foreign husband get ARC even though we currently do not live in Taiwan? Thanks. Your information is very helpful.

    • profile image

      anonymous 7 years ago

      Can my foreign husband get ARC even though we currently do not live in Taiwan? Thanks. Your information is very helpful.

    • profile image

      anonymous 8 years ago

      Does anyone know of an English national who has married a Taiwanese national in Taiwan? My son has done this already, but has been told that it's not recognised in England and must have another ceremony in the UK? Is this correct? does anyone know of anyone who has done this and if so how as the UK registrar won't marry you if you say you've been married before even if it's to the same person.

    • ChouDoufu profile image
      Author

      ChouDoufu 8 years ago

      First, sorry for responding so late. For some reason, I didn't get or missed the normal e-mail notification of new comments. Ouderui, thanks for the update; I'm sorry things are not going very smoothly and wish you and your family the best. I wish I could provide more help, but as you note, my experiences are now several years out of date. I highly recommend that anyone looking for more current help and advice check out the Forumosa.com forums. [in reply to Ouderui]

    • profile image

      anonymous 8 years ago

      It's amazing (and in some ways heartening) to hear a success story from someone who has been through this since my wife and I have been jumping through hoops for the past 4 months to get this only to be told that many of the old laws have changed and under the new laws it is entirely possible that it could not only take up to another 6 months, but that we may be denied. For anyone trying this after May 11th you also have to provide a ciminial background check from Taiwan and it is only valid for one month instead of the previous 3. You also have to have 2 interviews with someone from foreign affairs, one of which is a home-visit. After what I had read I was of the opinion that it was a fairly simple procedure and I would have my ARC through my wife within about 3 months, but now because of all of the confusion, stress, and frustration caused by this process, I am seriously considering packing us up and heading back to the States. Good luck to all others.

    • profile image

      anonymous 8 years ago

      thanks for your help but i can't seem to get any reply from my question.

      is there any official departments i can contact ?

      maybe i can get an answer from them .

      thank you

    • ChouDoufu profile image
      Author

      ChouDoufu 8 years ago

      [in reply to alan] I'm not qualified to give advice on Taiwan law and I've never been through a divorce in Taiwan. I suggest checking out the Forumosa discussion forum on divorce.

    • profile image

      anonymous 8 years ago

      what happens if u divorce ? would the foreign partner have to leave taiwan and return home ?

      or are you given any rights after so many years of living and being married in taiwan ?

      i think in england foreigners can stay in the country permanent after two years of marriage even if it ends in divorce.

      i think it would be unfair if u had to leave after you had built a life there .

      does anyone know the rights we would have there ?

    • profile image

      anonymous 8 years ago

      Just a question. I'm already married and on household registration etc. Does anyone know if obtaining a spousal visa gets you off any of the capital requirements ($NT1 million for a company without a Taiwanese partner and $NT500,000 with a Taiwanese partner) for registering a company in Taiwan?

      Cheers.

    • ChouDoufu profile image
      Author

      ChouDoufu 8 years ago

      Roy Boy,

      This lens is written from my experiences, so it is focused on Americans marrying Taiwanese. Much of the information, however, will be applicable to your situation. A good resource to check out, if you have not already, is the "marriage and divorce" forum on Forumosa.

      Best of luck!

    • profile image

      anonymous 8 years ago

      Hi,

      Your Lens and other peoples comments are very helpful..I am however intrigued to know if this is all USA related blurb or would you think to any nationality ? I am a UK guy about to make a 'life move' to be with my wife in Taiwan.

    • profile image

      anonymous 8 years ago

      [in reply to Julie Lee]

      Julie,

      What did you find out? From what I understand, you would have to relinguish your USA citizenship to become a Taiwanese with national ID and passport. Otherwise you can always only be a PARC (permanent alien registration card) holder.

    • profile image

      anonymous 8 years ago

      Julie:

      Not sure if this is too late...but I'm a Taiwanese citizen, became U.S. citizen years later after immigrating to the states, got married and had my kids in NYC. When it came time to move to Taiwan with my family (husband and two kids), the TECO office in NYC told me that the Taiwanese immigration law changed such that if one of the parents is a Taiwanese national, then the kids can apply for Taiwanese passport and get ID number and cards once they get here (you don't need a national ID in Taiwan until you're 14 but an ID number will be issued regardless) so they automatically become Taiwanese citizens even though they were born in the U.S. So, if one of your parents is a Taiwanese citizen and still has their valid Taiwanese passport, they can go to the local TECO office and get you a Taiwanese passport and when you arrive in Taiwan, you should be able to get a new one issued with your national ID and an ID card once you and your husband has done the household registry.

    • profile image

      anonymous 8 years ago

      Just a "Xie xie"! I married my Taiwanese wife in USA 18 months ago. She later had to return to Taiwan, and I wanted to accompany her. I found your site several months ago, and found it VERY helpful in my process. Ended up doing some things a bit differently, but I'm sure no 2 situations are the exactly same anyway.

      Tomorrow, picking up my Resident Visa (arrived on Visitor's, as thought to avert an extra trip to TECRO in DC from Baltimore), then ARC.

      Taiwan is GREAT! Been here just over 2 weeks. And my wife was able to celebrate her birthday in her home country after being away for 5 years.

      Thanks again for the help that your site provided!

    • ChouDoufu profile image
      Author

      ChouDoufu 9 years ago

      George, sorry, but the purpose of this lens is to share my very specific situation. I am not an immigration lawyer and can't tell you much. I do, however, remember that for someone in your situation, you will probably want to get a fiancé visa for your girlfriend before her trip where you intend to wed. But this was years ago, the law may have changed. I suggest hiring an immigration attorney.

    • profile image

      anonymous 9 years ago

      My long time girl friend who lives in Taiwan an goes back and forth to the United States here in Seattle on a business visa. My question is we want to get married the next time she comes here and then stay. If we get married then what do I have to do to get her a permanent residence visa so she can stay.

      Thank you for your help, you can write me at gwpii43@yahoo.com

      George

    • profile image

      anonymous 9 years ago

      Very helpful and extremely detailed. Thanks!

    • ChouDoufu profile image
      Author

      ChouDoufu 9 years ago

      Ramesh, sorry, I can't help you. If you are looking for dating services, there are plenty around and I'm sure you can find something by running a Google search. This isn't the place to post such requests.

    • ChouDoufu profile image
      Author

      ChouDoufu 9 years ago

      Julie, I suggest you post to Forumosa.com, which has a good community of ex-pats in Taiwan. I'm sure that there is someone who was in your situation that can help you. I am not an expert in Taiwanese family or immigration law. I only am sharing my personal experience and my circumstances were different from yours. You'd do best to post your question at Forumosa.com.

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      anonymous 9 years ago

      my name is ramesh adhikari and my birth place is in nepal and i want to marry with taiwan ladies so plz if there is any beautiful simple co-operative ladies meet with me

      yours sincerely

      ramesh

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      anonymous 9 years ago

      I am Chinese American born in USA and my husband is originally from Taiwan. We were married in the States. Would I be able to become a Taiwanese citizen? Can I get a Taiwanese national ID and passport after we moved to Taiwan? Thanks.

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      anonymous 9 years ago

      Excellent information.

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      anonymous 10 years ago

      I really appreciated this article... my Taiwanese Fiancé and I are busy trying to get all our paperwork ready, but your info has made it a lot easier... THANK YOU

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      ChouDoufu 10 years ago

      YEAH! My scanner arrived. I'm hoping to get it set up and have time to update the images on this site.

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      ChouDoufu 10 years ago

      It is taking me a while to put up all the supporting images for this lens on Flickr. I will not get my scanner until the end of the month. Also, with a baby on the way my work on this and other lenses is sporadic.