dashingscorpio profile image 86

Do you distinguish a difference between your "deal breakers" and "red flags" when dating?


If you observe something you consider to be a "red flag" or potential problem in a relationship is it an automatic "deal breaker" for you? or Do you take a wait and see approach? or Do you find you only acknowledge "red flags" in (hindsight) after a relationship has ended?

 

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Dr Billy Kidd profile image91

Dr Billy Kidd says

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2 years ago
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    dashingscorpio 2 years ago

    Dr Billy Kidd, I appreciate your answer. Imagine you were dating someone who told you they would meet you for dinner but you didn't hear from them until the next day. The excuse given didn't (sound) true. "Deal breaker" or "red flag"? hmm


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Veterans View profile image61

Michael (Veterans View) says

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2 years ago
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    dashingscorpio 2 years ago

    I agree it's probably best not to have an itchy trigger finger. Waiting to see if there is a pattern before making a decision is wise when observing "red flags". However as you stated a "deal breaker" is a "deal breaker". :)

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Kate McBride (Kate Mc Bride) says

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2 years ago
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Lynda Pringle (lyndapringle) says

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2 years ago
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    dashingscorpio 2 years ago

    A lot of folks give people "the benefit of the doubt" early on or try to adapt when they're attracted to a (new) person. Thus the adage: "Love is blind". They see what they want to see. "Red flags" are often (differences) that cause issues later.

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Sarah (Sara Jofre) says

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2 years ago
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    dashingscorpio 2 years ago

    Sometimes a perceived "red flag" turns out to be a harmless case of miscommunication or misunderstanding. Anyone who has been hurt before is likely to automatically distrust someone who reminds them of a past situation. Thanks for your answer.

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Elena (elenagarcia) says

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2 years ago
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    Kate McBride (Kate Mc Bride) 2 years ago

    simple as that as right-it is matter of making good choices in the journey of life.


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Disillusioned (C.V.Rajan) says

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2 years ago
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    dashingscorpio 2 years ago

    C.V.Rajan; This is a hypothetical question. I'm curious to know if the average person considers "red flags" to be automatic "deal breakers" or if they view them as "potential problems" they should keep an eye on.


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Darlene Matthews (Elearn4Life) says

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2 years ago
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    dashingscorpio 2 years ago

    "All I'm saying is I had some of the best times with some red flagging deal breaking people!" Elearn4Life you sound like a courageous risk taker! :)

    Thanks for your answer!


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