Billie Kelpin profile image 93

We can "unlike" someone on Facebook, but how do we "un-love" someone in real life?


Assuming it is important to "un-love" a person - someone who has left you or has done something to endanger another, etc., what is the mental process of un-loving someone who may at one time been very dear to you? From watching programs like 20/20, etc, one would imagine there are many people who need this information. Perhaps it is unneccesary to "un-love" a person if you are able to compartmentalize your past life and your present life? This would be a good hub for someone to write, I think, if we, as a group, could come up with specific strategies that demonstrate this process.

 

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JayeWisdom profile image95

Jaye Denman (JayeWisdom) says

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2 years ago
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  • fpherj48 profile image

    Paula (fpherj48) 2 years ago

    Hi Jaye-girl! Why could we not have been so wise many years ago BEFORE all the heartache came? I suspect this is the way it must be....."Happy Mother's Day!!" Peace, Paula


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dashingscorpio profile image86

dashingscorpio says

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2 years ago
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  • Billie Kelpin profile image

    Billie Kelpin 2 years ago

    Dashing, Thanks for your response. The connection to loving yourself is a cognitive leap in my mind. You must never allow a person to treat you like a doormat, of course, but disassociating doesn't mean that you don't love the person who once was


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fpherj48 profile image81

Paula (fpherj48) says

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2 years ago
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Amunigun Halimah says

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2 years ago
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