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Don't Be A Miracle Seeker

Updated on October 3, 2019
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Matthew is a Christian who loves God. He's been an online writer for 4 years. He loves to share his faith with people all over the world.

“Nothing attracts people like miracles.” This simple statement explains the motivation and deceptive nature behind the fad of pulling people to be involved in a show of drama—using promises of miracles as the bait.

Nowadays, the leaders that mount the pews are now after psychological manipulation seduction. They now aim at stirring up euphoria in the atmosphere just to make sure they gather lots of people. It would have been great if these people came to seek God, but no; they simply came for a cinema show of signs and wonders from a God they never cared to know about. Besides, they came to see magicians perform miracles; they didn’t come to seek God.

Many so-called men of God have seen the powerful pulling effect of miracles in attracting people. And they’ve obviously been able to do quite a lot in making sure people come for their crusades and outdoor meetings using dubious means to achieve such ends. They look for catchy themes for their event, all in the quest to insidiously bait and catch people.

One of such so-called men of God is the German-born con man and faith healer, the famous born-again scoundrel, Peter Popoff. Peter, in many of his faith healing crusades was known for calling out names, phones numbers, and home address of particular people from his congregation. Sometimes, he even went further to name the sickness ailing them and praying for instant healing.

Many people believed Peter to be a true man of God until he met his waterloo in 1986. He was taken down by arch skeptic James Randi on Johnny Carson’s Tonight Show. Randi, along with a private investigator, attended one of Popoff’s then-popular prophetic “faith-healing” crusades, and discovered that Popoff’s prophetic messages from God were really just pieces of information picked up by his staff and whispered into Popoff’s earpiece by his wife, Elizabeth.

Reports reveal that fifteen months later, Popoff and his organization filed for bankruptcy and disappeared from public view.[i]

The manner in which Popoff’s ministry ended clearly shows the reason behind all the shadiness that surrounded his ministry, which motivated him use lies to attract a lot of crowd: His avarice for money. He knew that if he was going to be rich, then people had to come for his gatherings. He knew that miracles attracted people and was determined to use it to lure his snare. The snare where you give all the money you have to the ‘man of God’ in exchange for a miracle.

Without a doubt, a man could be a true miracle worker for a while, and later on miss God yet the ability to perform miracle stays with him. That means God doesn’t collect back the gifts that he gives. This is the reason pagans and all kinds of people in all kinds of religions perform miracles—yet still live grossly objectionable lives. This is with Satan being their master.

Surely, we shouldn’t priorities miracles in our lives. We shouldn’t make it the basis for trusting a man of God. Because if we become just miracle seeker, instead of God seekers, we become vulnerable to the deception of so-called men of God. These men of God also become tempted to act like clowns displaying fake miracles instead of revealing God to the people.

The word “clown” brings to mind the famous Dan Rice. Rice was a popular clown during the 19th century. An household name at the time. He was so popular that he coined terms that are still in usage today, i.e., “one horse show” and “greatest show”. Your guess us as good as mine: He was good at attracting people for his shows.

This made politician, Zachary Taylor hire him to campaign for him. The success of Rice’s campaign for Zachary Taylor resulted in subsequent attempts by other politicians to try to copy his approach. This led to the coinage of the term, the “bandwagon effect.” So, called men of God have become clown that use fake miracles to attract attendee for their circus show—all in the quest to get money from them, like Peter Popoff did. You hear phrases such as, “break the back of poverty with a thousand dollars”, where in fact; there could be nothing further from the truth.

[i]https://skepticalinquirer.org/exclusive/the_woman_who_took_on_popoff_the_hidden_story_of_crystal_sanchez_the_peter_/

Peter Popoff
Peter Popoff

Miracles Make You Wait on God

Have you ever heard someone say, “I’m waiting on God for my miracle?” But the question is, when do you suppose God will answer you? That statement seems to suggest that God is holding something back from us and we have to wait for him to release it. This doesn’t only paint God in a negative and false light; it also makes us become inactive and irresponsible creatures on earth, waiting for God to give us something and blaming him if we never get it.

While you’re waiting on God, apparently, you won’t get working because you believe you cannot get anything done yourself so God has to do for you what you were suppose to do yourself. This is what miracles make you become: irresponsible.

The sad story for ardent miracle seeker is this: The earth wasn’t made to function by miracles—God’s work. In other words, God is not the one meant to manage or work the earth, but man. Miracles are God’s acts. We need the acts of man on the earth. Man was meant to mange the earth, while God already put everything we need on earth for man to function on the earth and fulfil his purpose. You don’t impress God by looking for what he can do, you impress God by doing things he created you to do with whatever resources you have available.

Of course, once in a while, God could intervene in man’s affairs and cause a supernatural event to happen on the earth. But this isn’t what we live by every day, that’s not what governs our lives. It’s only in heaven that you have miracles every second. Here on earth, it’s principles that govern our action. We ought to follow the principles of God’s word to achieve success.

It’s even gotten to a point where people just want to use miracles as an avenue to use God to achieve what principles like self-discipline ought to help us achieve. It’s lazy people that use God in that manner. The truth is, Christianity is not magic; God is not a magician. He tells us to release our potential through work. Sadly, miracles seekers are made to believe God is a rewarded of laziness and mediocrity. The people will rather spend the whole day in church shouting, “I receive my miracle!” while the pagans are out there producing excellent goods and ruling the earth.

Come to think of it, the children of Israel sought for and saw God’s miracles, while Moses sought for and saw God. He ended up closer to God than all the people of Israel put together. The Bible enunciates: God made known his ways to Moses, his deeds to the people of Israel. [i] If you’re smart, you’ll seek the knowledge of God rather than miracles from God. You’ll seek for his heart rather than his hands.

We shouldn’t become so spiritually minded that we lose earthly relevance. The truth is, if we determine to fulfil our purpose for being on the earth, instead of seeing miracles, our lives will be an example of a living miracle. In short, miracles are supposed to chase and follow after us, not we chasing after miracles.

[i] Psalm 103:7 (NIV)

Miracle: Fulfilling Your Purpose on Earth

The Bible clearly states that miraculous signs will accompany those who believe.[1] And all these happen while we’re doing what he called us to do on the earth. By the way, what’s the purpose of miracles, signs and wonders? An understanding of this will make us see that miracles aren’t really a big deal because our lives ought to be the miracle that people see.

First, Jesus states in John 4:48, “Except ye see signs and wonders, ye will not believe.” Believing in God requires some signs. We need to know that God exist. And these signs ought to direct us to him.

Signs, in their simplest definition, are indications. They indicate, point, tell, show or direct us to something. If you were looking for a stadium where people play sports, you’ll need a sign that points you to the stadium. When you see the sign, you won’t make a feast around the sign because that’s still not your destination. They sign is never your goal, the goal is the stadium you were looking for.

Now, a wonder is also a sign, but it’s a sign that amazes us. Hence, the words “miracle”, “sign” and “wonders” are synonymous: they all point us to something. They point us to God. Your life ought to be a sign that will give indications and directions such that when people see you, they will be amazed at the wonderful things that God is doing in and through you.

That is the miracle that God wants to reveal on the earth: Your life purpose. So as Jesus right said, “except ye see signs and wonders, ye will not believe” (John 4:48), people can now believe in God through you.

Miracles aren’t necessarily external observable phenomena that can be seen by careful observation, they are inside you. Jesus says it this way, “The kingdom of God cometh not with observation: Neither shall they say, Lo here! Or there, lo there! For, behold, the kingdom of God is within you.”[2]

Be the miracle that the whole world is seeking. God has no hands but yours. Be the hand that extends God’s hand to the earth by working and fulfilling your potential on the earth. In his book, Releasing Your Potential, Myles Munroe states “Work is the method God established to release His potential.” In essence, God’s potential is revealed when you work out your potential. When you use what God has given you to bless the world, that’s releasing your potential; that’s a miracle. Hence, stop seeking miracles, seek God, release His potential through your work and he’ll make your life a wonder.

[1] Mark 16:17, NLT

[2] Luke 17:20-21, KJV

© 2019 Matthew Joseph

Comments

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    • celafoe profile image

      charlie 

      4 weeks ago from From Kingdom of God living on Planet earth in between the oceans

      great and scripturally correct article, many should take heed

    • The0NatureBoy profile image

      Elijah A Alexander Jr 

      5 weeks ago from Washington DC

      Matthew, I really appreciate that presentation, it is well said. However, to me your title is deceiving.

      The miracle we should all seek is the the New Birth that Paul said in Romans 1:20 would follow the natural birth, not the fake one people say they obtained just by saying "Lord Jesus Com into my heart" that saved them. Because I am reborn I will only tell others of any "miracles" god performed because of something I said and the person obeyed what Spirit told them to do and they obtained their desire instantly.

      Other than that, your lesson hit "the nail squarely on the head," thanks for sharing it.

    • Rochelle Frank profile image

      Rochelle Frank 

      5 weeks ago from California Gold Country

      Very insightful.

      Some people think that God does not answer their prayers, but sometimes the answer is "no", or "not yet".

      Jesus was tempted to perform a miracle on his own behalf and said that we should not test God.

      Life is a journey with lessons to be learned. Prayer requests should always end with "Thy will be done."

      Thank you for writing this thoughtful piece.

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