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Is Pain Really an Enemy?

Updated on March 2, 2017

Pain is a common symptom every one of us experience every now and then. We feel relieved if we get rid of it. We tend to get over from pain by the way of pills or other methods like drinking. According to an article in the recent TIME magazine, unless the basic mindset is changed – insistence on deploying a physical therapy in pain management – no real progress will take place in ending the dependency on drinks and other drugs. Drinks and other drugs have become a little more than quick fixes and this had been long said by the sages who formulated the vedic astrology.

Pain versus Pleasure

As far as motivation and why people decide to do something, it is based on the simple science of pain versus pleasure. As it is, instinctively, everyone wants to keep away from pain and gain pleasure. In fact, they’ll do more to avoid immediate pain that attaining immediate pleasure; it’s okay even if they don’t get pleasure.

For patients with chronic pain, the physical and emotional are interconnected. Emotions win over logic all the time. If you bring emotion into the equation, that element looks huge no matter what the type or reason is. Whenever we are dying with acute pain, we’ve heard people say, “It’s all in your head.” What they mean is pain. The pain is processed in the brain, along with parts that regulate emotions.

Pain is considered bad at all times. Is pain really an enemy? Pain kills pain. It gives a word of warning, in addition to enhancing pleasure. So, embrace it and learn from it. It carries a message. “By taking control of your pain, you put it at ease or you’ll invite disease.”

Is pain bearable?

Consider a teenage girl on the dental chair for orthodontic treatment. The protection against the inescapable, excruciating pain is to think of a soldier who faced bullets in the battlefield. If he was able to withstand that pain, the pain encountered during the orthodontic treatment is by far lesser than that of the soldier. This is the meaning of pain according to Dr. Vinay Bajangi.

Here’s what he says:

I also remember another incident when my thumb was caught in between a swinging gate and the wall. Unable to bear the pain, I ran to my mother. Under extreme shock and anxiety, she slapped me for playing on the gate in spite of many warnings. The shock and embarrassment of the slap overtook the throbbing pain.

I was deeply saddened with my father’s death, who I revered the most. But, after I realized my melancholy if I had lost him much earlier or all of a sudden, my agony alleviated. The thought of worse situation helps us manage smaller torment; pain kills pain. A person who has gone through grievous pain understands similar pain experienced by others. He empathizes and connects with them soon.

As children, when we had been looking at people wailing at a tragedy, my mother used to say, “No one is crying for another. We’ll cry for the agony we ourselves had gone through.” I felt she was very right.

Studies have shown that when people share others’ pain, they become better bonded and cooperative while when they’re involved in some non-painful activity, they’re not so emotional and co-operative. When groups take on challenging tasks together the members become socially glued. This is probably the reason why people in some communal practices across the world share a component of pain during the activity. We cannot forget the deepest memories no matter how old they are.

Ultimately, pain is a common symptom every one of us experience more often than not. We feel relieved if we get rid of it. We tend to get over from pain by the way of pills or other methods like drinking. It is considered bad at all times. Instinctively, everyone wants to keep away from pain and gain pleasure. However, they’ll do more to avoid immediate pain that attaining immediate pleasure. Researchers say, “Emotional pain has a greater impact than physical pain.” Pain caused by emotive suffering is more intensely sensed than that caused by physical injuries. Also, the pain caused by emotional distress is long lasting. When you encounter throbbing pain, let’s say because of a root canal treatment, think of a soldier who has received bullets in the battlefield. The pain will be relatively smaller.

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