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HEBREW LETTERS | Hebrew Alphabet

Updated on January 25, 2014
Hebrew Alphabet
Hebrew Alphabet

Hebrew Letters | Hebrew Alphabet

Learn the Hebrew Letters and the Hebrew Alphabet in this free online tutorial with alphabet cards and videos for learning Hebrew. Print the Hebrew letter chart.

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The Hebrew alphabet is the starting place for learning the Hebrew language.

Once you learn the Hebrew letters, you'll be able to read Hebrew by 'sounding out' words you see, which is probably the way you learned to read your mother-tongue language. When you know the Hebrew letters, learning words will be easy.

Everything you need to learn the letters of the Hebrew Alphabet is on this page.

Use the Table of Contents, or just scroll down to see everything.

Hebrew Letter Chart - The AlephBet - האלפבית

The Hebrew Alphabet  – The Hebrew Aleph-Bet – האלפבית
The Hebrew Alphabet – The Hebrew Aleph-Bet – האלפבית

You can right-click to copy the Hebrew Alphabet Chart, paste it to a document on your computer, and print it for personal use*, to use in a classroom or for home schooling.

The Hebrew Letters – from Aleph to Tav
The Hebrew Letters – from Aleph to Tav

The Hebrew Alphabet

The Hebrew alphabet is called the Aleph-Bet (אלפבית), and it is named for the first two letters of the Jewish alphabet – the Aleph and the Bet.

The English word alphabet came from the Hebrew word! Today, the Aleph-Bet contains the alphabet of ancient Hebrew, of Biblical Hebrew, and some modern additions to the language.

Once you learn the Hebrew alphabet, you can begin to read the most famous Hebrew documents in the world – the Dead Sea Scrolls – which were written more than 2,100 years ago. These are the oldest manuscripts of the Bible in existence and they are written in the same Hebrew that you will learn right here. The purity of the Hebrew language has been preserved like no other language in the world. (Consider the fact that most native English speakers cannot read manuscripts written in Old English from just a thousand years ago.)

The modern Hebrew alphabet contains:

22 letters

5 letters that change their form when used at the end of a word (Sofit)

3 letters that change pronunciation when a dot (Dagesh) is added in the middle of the letter

In the pictures below, you'll find printable cards for the 22 Hebrew alphabet letters, the five letters with Sofit (final) forms, and the Dagesh (dot).

Each card has a picture that helps as a memory clue to recognize the letter. Many of the images represent words that are pronounced the same in English and in Hebrew, or are very similar. Some pictures will be familiar to you from Judaism.

Hebrew Letters

On this page you will find the online tutorial for learning all the Hebrew letters. The flash cards for all of the alphabet letters match the chart above for easy reference. You may use the cards below for personal use*). Just right-click on the flash card you want, paste it on a document page on your computer, and print. Enjoy!

If you are helping children learn the Hebrew letters, the cards can be used to play the Go Fish game for a fun learning experience.

You can jump to a specific letter by clicking on it here, or just scroll down to see them all:

א -- ב -- ג -- ד -- ה -- ו -- ז -- ח -- ט -- י -- כ -- ך -- ל -- מ

-- ם -- נ -- ן -- ס -- ע -- פ -- ף -- צ -- ץ -- ק -- ר -- ש -- ת

Hebrew Letter Aleph – אלף
Hebrew Letter Aleph – אלף

The Hebrew Letter Aleph

Aleph (אלף) is the first letter in the Hebrew alphabet (אלפבית). It is pronounced like the English word olive, except there is an 'f' sound at the end.

Because it's the first letter, it's easy to remember.

In Hebrew, the word for avocado is pronounced the same as the English word. To write the word in Hebrew, you begin with the letter aleph (אלף).

In the flash card below, you are reminded what the letter is when you see the picture of the avocado.

Hebrew Alphabet Letter Aleph – האלפבית אוֹת אלף
Hebrew Alphabet Letter Aleph – האלפבית אוֹת אלף
Hebrew Letter Bet or Vet – בית
Hebrew Letter Bet or Vet – בית

The Hebrew Letter Bet

The Hebrew letter Bet (בית) has a special place in Judaism because it is the first letter of the very first word in the Bible. Rabbis tell many stories about why this is so.

The letter Bet (בית) is pronounced like the letter 'B' or 'V' in English. You'll learn which way it is pronounced when you begin to learn Hebrew words.

Here's a word that you already know how to say in Hebrew: banana. Because no one had ever seen a banana in ancient Israel, there was never a word for it in Hebrew until modern times. When Israel began to import and plant bananas, the word for them was imported as well.

You'll find many words like this in the modern Hebrew language. So, you probably know more Hebrew words than you think you do!

Hebrew Alphabet Letter Bet or Vet – האלפבית אוֹת בית
Hebrew Alphabet Letter Bet or Vet – האלפבית אוֹת בית
The Hebrew Letter Gimel – גימל
The Hebrew Letter Gimel – גימל

Hebrew Letter Gimel

Camels are mentioned many times in the Bible and the word for camel has been found in very ancient Hebrew writing carved on stones.

In Hebrew, the word for camel is pronounced the way it is in English, except that it begins with a 'G' sound like in the word girl.

The 'G' sound is made with the Hebrew letter Gimel (גימל). The letter Gimel (גימל) even looks a little bit like a camel, so it is an easy letter to remember.

Hebrew Alphabet Letter Gimel –  האלפבית אוֹת גימל
Hebrew Alphabet Letter Gimel – האלפבית אוֹת גימל
Gimel with a Geresh is a 'J'
Gimel with a Geresh is a 'J'
Giraffe – ג'ירפה
Giraffe – ג'ירפה

There's no sound for the English letter 'J' in Hebrew. It just doesn't exist in the language. But sometimes, Israelis need to write a foreign word like the name George or the word giraffe.

So, the way this is done is by taking the letter Gimel (גימל) and placing an apostrophe after it. The apostrophe is called a Geresh (גרש).

This doesn't make a new letter in Hebrew; it just provides a way to spell a foreign word properly. (But, not everyone in Israel can actually say the 'J' sound like an English speaker does!)

You won't see the Gimel (גימל) with a Geresh (גרש) very often because it just isn't found in many words written in the Hebrew language. And you won't find it in the Bible or in the Jewish prayer book!

But, if you ever go to the Biblical Zoo in Jerusalem, you'll see it on a sign at the exhibit where the giraffes live.

The Hebrew Letter Dalet – דלת
The Hebrew Letter Dalet – דלת
Opened Door Dalet (דלת) Shape
Opened Door Dalet (דלת) Shape

Hebrew Letter Dalet

The Hebrew letter Dalet (דלת) has the same 'D' sound as in English.

It got its name because it looks like a doorway when the door is opened. In fact, the word dalet (דלת) in Hebrew is the word for this letter and it is also the word for door.

So, when you learn this word, you will know two more words in the Hebrew language.

The Hebrew word for door (דלת) is one of the most ancient words and is found in the Bible where it is used in the account of the Garden of Eden. (The lesson there is that opening a door can lead to something very evil. The second time the word is used in the Bible, opening a door leads to something very good – to Noah's ark.)

Just notice the opened door when you see a dalet (דלת) and you will find that this is a very easy letter to learn.

Hebrew Alphabet Letter Dalet – האלפבית אוֹת דלת
Hebrew Alphabet Letter Dalet – האלפבית אוֹת דלת
The Hebrew Letter Hey – הא
The Hebrew Letter Hey – הא
Chanukah Dreidel Letter Hey
Chanukah Dreidel Letter Hey

Hebrew Letter Hey

The Hebrew letter Hey (הא) is for the sound of the letter 'H' in the English language. This letter is probably familiar to you because it is used two times in the four-letter Hebrew name of the God of Israel.

Many, many times in Hebrew you will find the Hey (הא) used at the beginning of other words. When you see this, it is identical to the word the in English. If you want to write 'the alphabet', you just put the Hey (הא) in front of the Hebrew word for alphabet (אלפבית):

האלפבית

It's easy to write the word Hey (הא) because it only has two letters: Hey (הא) and Aleph (אלף).

Hey is also one of the letters found on the spinning dreidel toy used to play a game for Chanukah.

The letter looks a lot like a hockey player. The word hockey is the same in Hebrew as it is in English. In Hebrew, the word begins with the letter hey (הא). So, just remember that hey (הא) is for hockey!

Hebrew Alphabet Letter Hey – האלפבית אוֹת הא
Hebrew Alphabet Letter Hey – האלפבית אוֹת הא
The Hebrew Letter Vav – וו
The Hebrew Letter Vav – וו
Word Shalom in Hebrew with Vowels
Word Shalom in Hebrew with Vowels

Hebrew Letter Vav

The Hebrew letter Vav (וו) is for the sound of the letter 'V' in the English language. To write the word Vav (וו) in Hebrew, you just write two Vav (וו) letters. In some type fonts used on the Internet, the Vav (וו) doesn't display the top hook to the left – like on the website you are viewing. Don't worry; you'll get used to seeing it both ways.

When the Vav (וו) is used at the beginning of other words, it means and. So, you will see this little Vav (וו) a lot in printed Hebrew.

Sometimes the Vav is used to represent the sound of the English vowel 'O'. You'll find this in the familiar word, shalom (שלום). Mostly, Hebrew is written without vowels. But, when you see a Vav (וו) with a dot on top, the text is showing you that the Vav (וו) is for the vowel sound 'O' in English. (This is a vowel, not a Dagesh.)

In the flash card below, you'll see that the Vav (וו) is used to spell the word vanilla. In Hebrew, the word is pronounced like it is in English, except there is no 'a' sound at the end. The letter looks just like a cone filled with ice cream, doesn't it?

Hebrew Alphabet Letter Vav – האלפבית אוֹת וו
Hebrew Alphabet Letter Vav – האלפבית אוֹת וו
The Hebrew Letter Zayin – זין
The Hebrew Letter Zayin – זין

Hebrew Letter Zayin

The Hebrew letter Zayin (זין) is for the 'Z' sound in English.

In the Bible, the word Zayin (זין) also means sword. The letter looks like a sword, doesn't it?

The letter Zayin (זין) is used to spell the word for zebra and that word is pronounced just like it is in English.

When you see the letter, notice that it has a long curving line just like the stripes on a zebra.

Hebrew Alphabet Letter Zayin – האלפבית אוֹת זין
Hebrew Alphabet Letter Zayin – האלפבית אוֹת זין
The Hebrew Letter Chet – חית
The Hebrew Letter Chet – חית

Hebrew Letter Chet

The Hebrew letter Chet (חית) is difficult for many English speakers to pronounce because the sound doesn't exist in the English alphabet. It's not pronounced like the 'ch' in the English word cheese. Not at all! To say it correctly, you make a gurgling sound at the back of the throat.

People from Scotland can say the Chet (חית) properly, because it is a sound they use in words like loch, as in the Loch Ness Monster. To hear the Chet (חית) pronounced, just go to the Hebrew Alphabet Video below.

The Chet (חית) is used in many words you probably already know, like L'Chaim – לחיים (to life).

When people try to identify this letter with something in the English alphabet, they will transliterate it as 'H', 'Ch' or 'Kh.' Because Chet (חית) is the first letter in the word Chanukah (חנוכה), this is why you see the name of the holiday spelled different ways when written in English.

Hebrew Alphabet Letter Chet  – האלפבית אוֹת חית
Hebrew Alphabet Letter Chet – האלפבית אוֹת חית
The Hebrew Letter Tet – טית
The Hebrew Letter Tet – טית

Hebrew Letter Tet

The Hebrew letter Tet (טית) is pronounced just like the letter 'T' in the English alphabet.

It is the first letter in the Hebrew word for toast and that word is pronounced just like it is in English.

If you think about it, the letter Tet (טית) is shaped like a toaster, with a space at the top for the toast to pop up.

So, it's easy to remember that Tet (טית) is for toast!

Hebrew Alphabet Letter Tet  – האלפבית אוֹת טית
Hebrew Alphabet Letter Tet – האלפבית אוֹת טית
The Hebrew Letter Yod – יוד
The Hebrew Letter Yod – יוד

Hebrew Letter Yod

The letter Yod (יוד) is pronounced like the 'Y' in the English word yellow.

Yod (יוד) is the smallest letter in the Hebrew alphabet but it has major significance. The most important word in Judaism and in the Hebrew language begins with this letter – the actual name of the God of Israel.

Like other Hebrew alphabet letters (אותיות האלפבית), many type fonts don't show the little hook at the top (like on this website).

Important Hebrew names begin with the letter Yod (יוד), including:


Jacob (Ya'akovיעקב)

Israel (Yisraelישראל)

Isaac (Yitzchakיצחק)

Judah (Yehudaיהודה)

Jewish (Yehudiיהודי)

Jerusalem (Yerushalayimירושלים)

Hebrew Alphabet Letter Yod and Israel Flag – האלפבית אוֹת יוד
Hebrew Alphabet Letter Yod and Israel Flag – האלפבית אוֹת יוד

Israel Flags

Valley Forge Flag 3-Foot by 5-Foot Nylon Israel Flag
Valley Forge Flag 3-Foot by 5-Foot Nylon Israel Flag

Read the great reviews of the quality of this outdoor flag of Israel.

 
The Hebrew Letter Kaf or Khaf – כף
The Hebrew Letter Kaf or Khaf – כף

Hebrew Letter Kaf

The Hebrew letter Kaf (כף) is for the sound of the English letter 'C' in the word cat, or for a Kh sound similar to the Chet ((חית)) at the beginning of the word Chanukah (חנוכה).

You'll learn the difference when you get to the last flash card for the Dagesh.

But for now, learn that the Kaf (כף) looks like a reversed letter 'C' in the English language. The Kaf (כף) begins the word for canary in Hebrew and that word is pronounced almost exactly the same as it is in the English. The letter even looks a little like the canary in the flash card below.

Hebrew Alphabet Letter Kaf or Khaf  – האלפבית אוֹת כף
Hebrew Alphabet Letter Kaf or Khaf – האלפבית אוֹת כף
The Hebrew Letter Kaf or Khaf Sofit – כף סופית
The Hebrew Letter Kaf or Khaf Sofit – כף סופית

Hebrew Letter Kaf Sofit

The Kaf (כף) changes its shape when it is at the end of a word. The final form is called a Kaf Sofit (כף סופית). The word Sofit (סופית) means final or end.

Like the letter Kaf (כף), it is pronounced either with a 'K' sound or a 'Kh' like the end of the name of the musical composer Bach.

The most important word in Judaism which uses the Kaf Sofitף סופית) is the name for the Bible – the Tanakh (תנ"ך). Tanakh (תנ"ך) is an acronym made up from the beginning letters of the three parts of the Hebrew Bible:

Torah (תורה) Law

Nevi'm (נביאים) Prophets

Ketuvim (כתובים) Writings

You can see the complete Tanakh (תנ"ך) online in Hebrew with English translation at the Tanakh website. The website also has translations in French, Spanish and Portuguese. On the website, you can also listen to any verse in the Bible, read in Hebrew. When you have learned the Hebrew letters, that website will help you learn how to read and pronounce Hebrew words.

Hebrew Alphabet Letter Kaf or Khaf Sofit – האלפבית אוֹת  כף סופית
Hebrew Alphabet Letter Kaf or Khaf Sofit – האלפבית אוֹת כף סופית
The Hebrew Letter Lamed – למד
The Hebrew Letter Lamed – למד

Hebrew Letter Lamed

The Hebrew letter Lamed (למד) is pronounced just like the English letter 'L.'

It's the tallest letter in the Hebrew alphabet and always stands out.

The word lamed (למד) is also the word for 'why?' in Hebrew. And why is that? Because everyone wants to know why the lamed stands so high above the other letters! Why, oh why?

In Hebrew, the word lemon starts with a lamed (למד) and is pronounced like the English word, except the accent is on the last syllable and the 'o' is really said like an 'o.' In Hebrew, the word lemon rhymes with cone.

The Hebrew Alphabet Letter Lamed – האלפבית אוֹת למד
The Hebrew Alphabet Letter Lamed – האלפבית אוֹת למד
The Hebrew Letter Mem – מם
The Hebrew Letter Mem – מם

Hebrew Letter Mem

The Hebrew letter Mem (מם) sounds exactly like the 'M' in the English alphabet. It is said that the symbol came from the ancient Egyptian hieroglyphic for the word water. The Phoenician word for water is mem. In Hebrew, the word for water is mayim (מים).

In many languages, the word for mother starts with a Mem sound. In Hebrew, the word for mother is imaמא).

It's sometimes said that the universal language is music. The word for music in Hebrew starts with the letter Mem and is pronounced like the English word, except you say 'ah' at the end.

The Hebrew Alphabet Letter Mem – האלפבית אוֹת מם
The Hebrew Alphabet Letter Mem – האלפבית אוֹת מם
The Hebrew Letter Mem Sofit – מם סופית
The Hebrew Letter Mem Sofit – מם סופית

Hebrew Letter Mem Sofit

The Hebrew letter Mem Sofit (מם סופית) is used when the Memם) comes at the end of a word. It sounds exactly the same as the Mem ם).

In fact, when you write the letter Memם) in Hebrew, it only has two letters: the Memם) and the Mem Sofit ם סופית).

It's easy to tell them apart: The Memם) is open at the bottom (because the word isn't finished yet) and the Mem Sofitם סופית) is closed at the bottom, because it is always the final letter and it closes the word.

Hebrew Alphabet Letter Mem Sofit  – האלפבית אוֹת מם סופית
Hebrew Alphabet Letter Mem Sofit – האלפבית אוֹת מם סופית
The Hebrew Letter Nun – נון
The Hebrew Letter Nun – נון

Hebrew Letter Nun

The Hebrew letter Nun (נון) sounds just like the English letter 'N' and the name of the letter is pronounced like the English word noon.

The letter is on the Chanukah dreidel, so you probably already know this letter.

The letter Nun (נון) is the first letter in the word for Ninja. (Yes, that's a Hebrew word now, too!) Look at the picture in the flash card below. The letter Nun looks just like the Ninja. And, notice how the 'J' sound is made with a Gimel (גימל) and a Geresh (גרש).

The Hebrew Alphabet Letter Nun – האלפבית אוֹת נון
The Hebrew Alphabet Letter Nun – האלפבית אוֹת נון
Hebrew Letter Nun Sofit – נון סופית
Hebrew Letter Nun Sofit – נון סופית

Hebrew Letter Nun Sofit

The letter Nun Sofit (נון סופית) is the final form of the letter Nun (נון) and you use this letter at the end of a word.

See: It's the last letter in the word for Nun - נון.

Some type fonts display the Nun Sofit (נון סופית) without the hook at the top, like on this website. You'll see it printed both ways.

It's also the last letter in the Hebrew word for balloon (בלון), which is pronounced just like the word in English. The Nun Sofit (נון סופית) kind of looks like a balloon with a long string.

Hebrew Alphabet Letter Nun Sofit  – האלפבית אוֹת נון סופית
Hebrew Alphabet Letter Nun Sofit – האלפבית אוֹת נון סופית
Hebrew Letter Samekh – סמך
Hebrew Letter Samekh – סמך

Hebrew Letter Samekh

The Hebrew letter Samekh or Samech (סמך) is pronounced like the letter 'S' in the English alphabet, as in the word sun. In fact, the letter Samekh (סמך) looks like the sun. In some font styles, like on this website, the Samekh (סמך) looks like the English letter 'O.'

The Hebrew word for sandal begins with the letter Samekh (סמך).

The Samekh (סמך) looks a little like a sandal and the word for sandal in Hebrew is pronounced just like it is in English. So, you already know how to say another word in Hebrew.

Hebrew Alphabet Letter Samekh – האלפבית אוֹת סמך
Hebrew Alphabet Letter Samekh – האלפבית אוֹת סמך
Hebrew Letter Ayin – עין
Hebrew Letter Ayin – עין

Hebrew Letter Ayin

The Hebrew letter Ayin (עין) doesn't really have an equivalent sound in any English letter. The beginning of the letter sounds a little like the word eye in English, but it is a deeper sound and is made by opening the back of the throat and using a deep voice.

To hear the Ayin (עין) pronounced, just go to the Hebrew Alphabet Video below.

In Hebrew, the word for eye (עין) is exactly the same as the word for the letter Ayin (עין). If you will remember that the Ayin (עין) sounds a little like the word eye in English, it will be easy to remember.

Hebrew Letter Ayin – האלפבית אוֹת עין
Hebrew Letter Ayin – האלפבית אוֹת עין
The Hebrew Letter Pey or Fey – פא
The Hebrew Letter Pey or Fey – פא

Hebrew Letter Pey or Fey

The Hebrew Letter Pey or Fey (פא) is either pronounced like the letter 'P' or the letter 'F' in English. You learn which way to say it just by learning Hebrew words.

Sometimes you will see the letter with a Dagesh (דגש) – a dot in the middle of the letter – and this will tell you exactly which pronunciation to use. But mostly, when you see Hebrew printed, it will be without the Dagesh (דגש).

That might sound confusing, but it really isn't. The words you learn will teach you how to pronounce the Pey (פא).

Take the word pizza, for example. It is pronounced just like the word in English, so you already know that the 'P' sound is used.

The Hebrew Alphabet Letter Pey or Fey – האלפבית אוֹת פא
The Hebrew Alphabet Letter Pey or Fey – האלפבית אוֹת פא
The Hebrew Letter Fey Sofit – פא סופית
The Hebrew Letter Fey Sofit – פא סופית

Hebrew Letter Fey Sofit

When the letter Fey (פא) is needed at the end of a word, the Fey Sofit (פא סופית) is used. This letter is always pronounced like the letter 'F' in English.

Some people think it looks a little like the English letter 'F' in reverse.

Like all Sofit (סופית) letters, you will only find it at the end of a word. The Fey Sofit (פא סופית) is found at the end of the very first word you learned in the Hebrew alphabet (האלפבית), the letter Aleph (אלף). So, you should already recognize it.

The Hebrew Alphabet Letter Fey Sofit – האלפבית אוֹת פא סופית
The Hebrew Alphabet Letter Fey Sofit – האלפבית אוֹת פא סופית
The Hebrew Letter Tzade – צדי
The Hebrew Letter Tzade – צדי

Hebrew Letter Tzade

The Hebrew letter Tzade (צדי) is sometimes spelled Tsade when written in English. That's because the sound it makes is like 'ts' in English, as in the word cats.

The letter is easy to recognize because the tail looks just like the bottom of the English letter 'Z', in reverse.

You are probably already familiar with this letter because it begins the word Tzadakah (צדקה), an extremely important word in Judaism. The word is often translated as charity, but that isn't exactly what it means. It really means justice. And it means that the less fortunate people among us deserve our help and, under Biblical law, have an absolute right to have our help. That is true justice.

Every Jewish home has a Tzadakah (צדקה) box to collect money to help other people. Most homes have several of them, one for each family member's Tzadakah (צדקה) obligation and one for each cause the family supports. If you look on your Tzadakah (צדקה) box, you'll probably see the letter Tzade (צדי) .

Yair Emanuel Star of David Tzedakah Box With Jerusalem Depictions
Yair Emanuel Star of David Tzedakah Box With Jerusalem Depictions

A collector's item from Israeli artist Yair Emanuel, made in his studio in Jerusalem.

 
The Hebrew Alphabet Letter Tzade – האלפבית אוֹת צדי
The Hebrew Alphabet Letter Tzade – האלפבית אוֹת צדי
Hebrew Letter Tzade Sofit – צדי סופית
Hebrew Letter Tzade Sofit – צדי סופית
Jewish National Fund Tzadakah Box
Jewish National Fund Tzadakah Box | Source

Hebrew Letter Tzade Sofit

When the letter Tzade (צדי) is needed at the end of a word, the Tzade Sofit (צדי סופית) is used.

This letter looks a little like a tree and is used to write the word tree (etz) in Hebrew: עץ.

It's easy to remember that this is a Tzade (צדי) because, since 1901, Jews around the world have collected Tzadakah (צדקה) to plant trees in Israel through the Jewish National Fund (JNF). The special blue Tzadakah boxes for this purpose have been in Jewish homes for more than 100 years!

Planting trees in Israel creates more oxygen for people to breathe and increases rainfall so people have water to drink. Wild animals need the trees, too! For two thousand years people cut down trees for wood, but didn't replant them. So, Israel was left without very many trees.

The money collected for the JNF charity is used for reforestation in the land of Israel (ארץ ישראל). The Hebrew word for land (which is where you plant trees) is eretz (ארץ).

Hebrew Alphabet Letter Tzade Sofit – האלפבית אוֹת צדי סופית
Hebrew Alphabet Letter Tzade Sofit – האלפבית אוֹת צדי סופית
Hebrew Letter Kof – קוף
Hebrew Letter Kof – קוף
Kof – קוף
Kof – קוף

Hebrew Letter Kof

The Hebrew letter Kof (קוף) is sometimes spelled Qof in English, because the English letters 'Q' and 'K' sound so much alike.

Some people say that the letter was named Kof (קוף) because it looks like the eye of a sewing needle. In fact, the word for needle in Hebrew is spelled exactly the same as the name for the letter Kof (קוף), but it is pronounced Kuf.

The word pronounced exactly the same as the word for the letter Kof (קוף) is the word for monkey in Hebrew. That word is found twice in the Hebrew Bible. Do you think a monkey looks like the letter Kof? Many people do.

You already know how to say a word in Hebrew which begins with the letter Kof (קוף): It is the word for kangaroo. The word is pronounced just like it is in the English language.

Hebrew Alphabet Letter Kof – האלפבית אוֹת קוף
Hebrew Alphabet Letter Kof – האלפבית אוֹת קוף
Hebrew Letter Resh – ריש
Hebrew Letter Resh – ריש
Hebrew Letter Resh – ריש
Hebrew Letter Resh – ריש
Hebrew Letters Dalet  דלת and Resh  ריש
Hebrew Letters Dalet דלת and Resh ריש

Hebrew Letter Resh

The Hebrew letter Resh (ריש) is pronounced just like the letter 'R' in the English language. It looks like the 'r' in English, only in reverse. (If you consider the fact that English is written left-to-right and Hebrew is written right-to-left, that makes perfect sense.)

In Israel, many people pronounce the Resh with a trilled 'R' sound, like in the Spanish language. So, you'll hear it pronounced like that, too.

The letter comes from a very ancient pictograph where the 'R' sound was represented by the symbol for a person's head, looking sideways. The word for head in Hebrew is rosh (ראש). The Hebrew word is also used for the 'head' of something, like the head of a company.

When learning the Hebrew alphabet, sometimes students are confused by the differences between the letters Dalet (דלת) and Resh (ריש). Look at the image at the right. Can you see the differences? If not, it might be time to see the optometrist for a new pair of glasses! It's not really a joke; it happens often when a person first starts to learn the Hebrew alphabet (האלפבית).

You already know a Hebrew word which begins with the letter Resh (ריש): It is the word Rabbi. Because the word is from the Hebrew languge, it is pronounced just like it is in English.

Hebrew Alphabet Letter Resh – האלפבית אוֹת ריש
Hebrew Alphabet Letter Resh – האלפבית אוֹת ריש
Hebrew Letter Shin or Sin – שין
Hebrew Letter Shin or Sin – שין
Evolution of Hebrew Letter Shin
Evolution of Hebrew Letter Shin

Hebrew Letter Shin or Sin

The Hebrew letter Shin (שין) is also the letter Sin (pronounced like the word seen in English). So, it is either pronounced like 'Sh' or like 'S' in the English language. For example, in the familiar word Shalom (שלום), the Shin (שין) is pronounced with an 'Sh' sound and in the word Israel (ישראל) the Shin (שין) is pronounced with an 'S' sound.

If the Shin (שין) has a dot on the top right or left, you'll know how to pronounce the letter. Otherwise, you'll recognize what to say just from the Hebrew words you learn.

There's an account in the Bible about how the Shin (שין) received two different pronunciations. The historical record is found in the twelfth chapter of the book of Judges (שופטים) in the year 1100 BCE. Two dialects had emerged within the tribes of Israel (ישראל) just like dialects are found in different regions in America or England. During a civil war among the tribes, members of opposing tribes were identified by the way they pronounced the letter Shin (שין) in the Hebrew word for grain growing on plants in the field – Shibboleth (שבלת).

When the Hebrew Bible was translated into English and printed, less than 500 years ago, the word Shibboleth became an English word to denote jargon only insider members of a group would know.

The letter Shin (שין) has had the same shape in the Hebrew alphabet (האלפבית) for at least four thousand years, since the days of Abraham.

It is the first letter in the word Shalom (שלום), which is translated as Peace, Hello (peaceful greetings), and goodbye (go in peace).

Hebrew Alphabet Letter Shin or Sin – האלפבית אוֹת שין
Hebrew Alphabet Letter Shin or Sin – האלפבית אוֹת שין
Shalom Dove
Shalom Dove
Seeka Shalom Dove Necklace from The Artazia Collection N1026
Seeka Shalom Dove Necklace from The Artazia Collection N1026

Hand-painted Hebrew word Shalom and Swarovski crystals - a work of art. The pendant is 1". Give the gift of peace.

 
Hebrew Letter Tav – תו
Hebrew Letter Tav – תו

Hebrew Letter Tav

The Hebrew letter Tav (תו) is the last letter of the alphabet. It is also the last letter of the term for the Hebrew alphabet (האלפבית).

The Jewish expression for exploring something thoroughly is 'from Aleph (אלף) to Tav (תו).' It's like saying 'from A to Z' in English.

The letter Tav (תו) sounds just like the letter 'T' in English. In Hebrew, it also represents the sound for 'th.' In the years before Hebrew was revived as a modern, everyday language, the ability to pronounce 'th' was lost and most Israelis can't make that sound at all! Yiddish preserved it somewhat in that the 'th' usage of the Tav (תו) became an 'S' sound in Yiddish.

The Tav (תו) is used for the word for tea in Hebrew. But, in Hebrew the word is pronounced tay.

Hebrew Alphabet Letter Tav – האלפבית אוֹת תו
Hebrew Alphabet Letter Tav – האלפבית אוֹת תו
Hebrew Dagesh – דגש
Hebrew Dagesh – דגש

Hebrew Dagesh Video

The Hebrew Dagesh (דגש)

The Hebrew Dagesh (דגש) is a dot placed inside a Hebrew letter which tells you which version of pronunciation to use when a letter can have more than one sound.

You will seldom see letters with a Dagesh (דגש), though, because printed Hebrew just doesn't use the symbol. But, when learning Hebrew, many people find the Dagesh (דגש) is helpful. You will find that it is added in Jewish prayer books used in countries outside of the land of Israel (ארץ ישראל).

The letters Dalet (דלת) and Gimel (גימל) can be written with a Dagesh (דגש), but these are for archaic pronunciations that you are unlikely to encounter. The Pey Sofit (פא סופית) also has a Dagesh (דגש), but that letter is so rare you will probably never see it in your lifetime.

The letters using a Dagesh (דגש) on the chart below are the ones you are most likely to see used in the Jewish prayer book and in printed texts used for education.

Hebrew Letter Chart with Dagesh
Hebrew Letter Chart with Dagesh

The Hebrew letter Shin (שין) also uses a dot, but it isn't called a Dagesh (דגש); it is called a Nikud (נקוד). In teaching English speakers, it is also called the 'Shin Dot' or the 'Sin Dot.' A dot by any other name is still a dot. It tells you how to pronounce the letter in a specific word.

The Shin Dot and the Sin Dot Chart
The Shin Dot and the Sin Dot Chart
Hebrew Dagesh Symbol  – דגש
Hebrew Dagesh Symbol – דגש

Learning the Hebrew letters opens the door to speaking, reading and writing in the Hebrew language (Evritעברית). Each letter (Otאוֹת) is a building block for words.

Repetition is the key to learning any language. Below you will find videos and coloring pages which repeat the letters (Ototאותיות) and will help you continue the learning process.

How do you pronounce the Hebrew letters? Watch this video from the Hebrew Sesame Street TV show in Israel. The show is called Shalom Sesame!

The Hebrew Alphabet Coloring Pages and Colouring Sheets - דפי צביעת האלפבית עברי
The Hebrew Alphabet Coloring Pages and Colouring Sheets - דפי צביעת האלפבית עברי

Hebrew Letter Coloring Pages Videos

Hebrew Letters Coloring Pages

Coloring Pages (also known as colouring sheets in UK English and as דפי צביעת in Hebrew) are a fun way for children to learn the Hebrew letters.

The time a child spends focusing on the shape of each letter while coloring is a learning process that cements the letter in the child's mind.

These Hebrew letter coloring pages are without other pictures, so a child can explore creativity as well.

You can right-click to copy the Hebrew letter coloring page, paste it to a document on your computer, and print it for personal use*, to use in a classroom, for home schooling, or for after-school play.

Before you print these out, watch the videos about Hebrew letter coloring pages and see how children created their own artwork with the letters. In the second video, a little girl also pronounces each letter and sings a Hebrew alphabet song.

You can jump to a specific letter's coloring page by clicking on it here, or just scroll down to see them all:

א -- ב -- ג -- ד -- ה -- ו -- ז -- ח -- ט -- י -- כ -- ך -- ל -- מ

ם -- נ -- ן -- ס -- ע -- פ -- ף -- צ -- ץ -- ק -- ר -- ש -- ת

Hebrew Letter Aleph Coloring Page - דף צביעה אוֹת אלף
Hebrew Letter Aleph Coloring Page - דף צביעה אוֹת אלף
Hebrew Letter Bet Coloring Page - דף צביעה אוֹת  בית
Hebrew Letter Bet Coloring Page - דף צביעה אוֹת בית
Hebrew Letter Gimel Coloring Page - דף צביעה אוֹת גימל
Hebrew Letter Gimel Coloring Page - דף צביעה אוֹת גימל
Hebrew Letter Dalet Coloring Page - דף צביעה אוֹת דלת
Hebrew Letter Dalet Coloring Page - דף צביעה אוֹת דלת
Hebrew Letter Hey Coloring Page - דף צביעה אוֹת הא
Hebrew Letter Hey Coloring Page - דף צביעה אוֹת הא
Hebrew Letter Vav Coloring Page - דף צביעה אוֹת וו
Hebrew Letter Vav Coloring Page - דף צביעה אוֹת וו
Hebrew Letter Zayin Coloring Page - דף צביעה אוֹת זין
Hebrew Letter Zayin Coloring Page - דף צביעה אוֹת זין
Hebrew Letter Chet Coloring Page - דף צביעה אוֹת חית
Hebrew Letter Chet Coloring Page - דף צביעה אוֹת חית
Hebrew Letter Tet Coloring Page - דף צביעה אוֹת טית
Hebrew Letter Tet Coloring Page - דף צביעה אוֹת טית
Hebrew Letter Yod Coloring Page - דף צביעה אוֹת יוד
Hebrew Letter Yod Coloring Page - דף צביעה אוֹת יוד
Hebrew Letter Kaf Coloring Page - דף צביעה אוֹת כף
Hebrew Letter Kaf Coloring Page - דף צביעה אוֹת כף
Hebrew Letter Kaf Sofit Coloring Page - דף צביעה אוֹת כף סופית
Hebrew Letter Kaf Sofit Coloring Page - דף צביעה אוֹת כף סופית
Hebrew Letter Lamed Coloring Page - דף צביעה אוֹת למד
Hebrew Letter Lamed Coloring Page - דף צביעה אוֹת למד
Hebrew Letter Mem Coloring Page - דף צביעה אוֹת מם
Hebrew Letter Mem Coloring Page - דף צביעה אוֹת מם
Hebrew Letter Mem Sofit Coloring Page - דף צביעה אוֹת מם סופית
Hebrew Letter Mem Sofit Coloring Page - דף צביעה אוֹת מם סופית
Hebrew Letter Nun Coloring Page - דף צביעה אוֹת נון
Hebrew Letter Nun Coloring Page - דף צביעה אוֹת נון
Hebrew Letter Nun Sofit Coloring Page - דף צביעה אוֹת נון סופית
Hebrew Letter Nun Sofit Coloring Page - דף צביעה אוֹת נון סופית
Hebrew Letter Samech Coloring Page - דף צביעה אוֹת סמך
Hebrew Letter Samech Coloring Page - דף צביעה אוֹת סמך
Hebrew Letter Ayin Coloring Page - דף צביעה אוֹת עין
Hebrew Letter Ayin Coloring Page - דף צביעה אוֹת עין
Hebrew Letter Pey Coloring Page - דף צביעה אוֹת פא
Hebrew Letter Pey Coloring Page - דף צביעה אוֹת פא
Hebrew Letter Fey Sofit Coloring Page - דף צביעה אוֹת פא סופית
Hebrew Letter Fey Sofit Coloring Page - דף צביעה אוֹת פא סופית
Hebrew Letter Tzade Coloring Page - דף צביעה אוֹת צדי
Hebrew Letter Tzade Coloring Page - דף צביעה אוֹת צדי
Hebrew Letter Tzade Sofit Coloring Page - דף צביעה אוֹת צדי סופית
Hebrew Letter Tzade Sofit Coloring Page - דף צביעה אוֹת צדי סופית
Hebrew Letter Kof Coloring Page - דף צביעה אוֹת קוף
Hebrew Letter Kof Coloring Page - דף צביעה אוֹת קוף
Hebrew Letter Resh Coloring Page - דף צביעה אוֹת ריש
Hebrew Letter Resh Coloring Page - דף צביעה אוֹת ריש
Hebrew Letter Shin Coloring Page - דף צביעה אוֹת שין
Hebrew Letter Shin Coloring Page - דף צביעה אוֹת שין
Hebrew Letter Tav Coloring Page - דף צביעה אוֹת תו
Hebrew Letter Tav Coloring Page - דף צביעה אוֹת תו

Hebrew Alphabet Cards

The Hebrew alphabet cards below are without the word or picture clues. You can use these to help with letter recognition. If you print them out and shuffle them like a deck of cards, you'll see how well you can recognize the letters in random order. Online, they are in alphabetical order, according to the Hebrew alphabet (AlephBet -אלפבית).

You can right-click to copy the Hebrew letters, paste to a document on your computer, and print them for personal use*, to use in a classroom, for home schooling, or for after-school play.

Hebrew Alphabet Letter Aleph – האלפבית אוֹת אלף
Hebrew Alphabet Letter Aleph – האלפבית אוֹת אלף
Hebrew Alphabet Letter Bet or Vet – האלפבית אוֹת בית
Hebrew Alphabet Letter Bet or Vet – האלפבית אוֹת בית
Hebrew Alphabet Letter Gimel – האלפבית אוֹת גימל
Hebrew Alphabet Letter Gimel – האלפבית אוֹת גימל
Hebrew Alphabet Letter Dalet – האלפבית אוֹת דלת
Hebrew Alphabet Letter Dalet – האלפבית אוֹת דלת
Hebrew Alphabet Letter Hey – האלפבית אוֹת הא
Hebrew Alphabet Letter Hey – האלפבית אוֹת הא
Hebrew Alphabet Letter Vav – האלפבית אוֹת וו
Hebrew Alphabet Letter Vav – האלפבית אוֹת וו
Hebrew Alphabet Letter Zayin – האלפבית אוֹת זין
Hebrew Alphabet Letter Zayin – האלפבית אוֹת זין
Hebrew Alphabet Letter Chet – האלפבית אוֹת חית
Hebrew Alphabet Letter Chet – האלפבית אוֹת חית
Hebrew Alphabet Letter Tet – האלפבית אוֹת טית
Hebrew Alphabet Letter Tet – האלפבית אוֹת טית
Hebrew Alphabet Letter Yod – האלפבית אוֹת יוד
Hebrew Alphabet Letter Yod – האלפבית אוֹת יוד
Hebrew Alphabet Letter Kaf or Khaf – האלפבית אוֹת כף
Hebrew Alphabet Letter Kaf or Khaf – האלפבית אוֹת כף
Hebrew Alphabet Letter Kaf or Khaf Sofit – האלפבית אוֹת כף סופית
Hebrew Alphabet Letter Kaf or Khaf Sofit – האלפבית אוֹת כף סופית
The Hebrew Alphabet Letter Lamed – האלפבית אוֹת למד
The Hebrew Alphabet Letter Lamed – האלפבית אוֹת למד
The Hebrew Alphabet Letter Mem – האלפבית אוֹת מם
The Hebrew Alphabet Letter Mem – האלפבית אוֹת מם
Hebrew Alphabet Letter Mem Sofit – האלפבית אוֹת מם סופית
Hebrew Alphabet Letter Mem Sofit – האלפבית אוֹת מם סופית
The Hebrew Alphabet Letter Nun – האלפבית אוֹת נון
The Hebrew Alphabet Letter Nun – האלפבית אוֹת נון
Hebrew Alphabet Letter Nun Sofit – האלפבית אוֹת נון סופית
Hebrew Alphabet Letter Nun Sofit – האלפבית אוֹת נון סופית
Hebrew Alphabet Letter Samekh – האלפבית אוֹת סמך
Hebrew Alphabet Letter Samekh – האלפבית אוֹת סמך
Hebrew Letter Ayin – האלפבית אוֹת עין
Hebrew Letter Ayin – האלפבית אוֹת עין
The Hebrew Alphabet Letter Pey or Fey – האלפבית אוֹת פא
The Hebrew Alphabet Letter Pey or Fey – האלפבית אוֹת פא
The Hebrew Alphabet Letter Fey Sofit – האלפבית אוֹת פא סופית
The Hebrew Alphabet Letter Fey Sofit – האלפבית אוֹת פא סופית
The Hebrew Alphabet Letter Tzade – האלפבית אוֹת צדי
The Hebrew Alphabet Letter Tzade – האלפבית אוֹת צדי
Hebrew Alphabet Letter Tzade Sofit – האלפבית אוֹת צדי סופית
Hebrew Alphabet Letter Tzade Sofit – האלפבית אוֹת צדי סופית
Hebrew Alphabet Letter Kof – האלפבית אוֹת קוף
Hebrew Alphabet Letter Kof – האלפבית אוֹת קוף
Hebrew Alphabet Letter Resh – האלפבית אוֹת ריש
Hebrew Alphabet Letter Resh – האלפבית אוֹת ריש
Hebrew Alphabet Letter Shin or Sin – האלפבית אוֹת שין
Hebrew Alphabet Letter Shin or Sin – האלפבית אוֹת שין
Hebrew Alphabet Letter Tav – האלפבית אוֹת תו
Hebrew Alphabet Letter Tav – האלפבית אוֹת תו
Happy Rosh Hashanah 5774!
Happy Rosh Hashanah 5774!

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Read about the celebration of the Rosh Hashanah holiday in Israel and learn how to say and write all of the traditional greetings in Hebrew for the Holiday:

Happy Rosh Hashanah!

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Read about the history of Jerusalem through poems and songs. An inspiration collection of the most holy place on earth and the city central to Judaism:

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Flag of Israel
Flag of Israel

Yom Kippur 2013 was the 40th anniversary of the Yom Kippur War. Read the account of Israel's miraculous victory in the largest religious war in human history:

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Read the chilling allegory of the next event on the horizon for Israel and be sure to watch the video at the end:

Fox Fairy Tale: The Israel Iran Conflict

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Share - Don't Copy.

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Who is the Writer Fox™? Read his bio in A Fox Fairy Tale.

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    • Anneikaelhouti profile image

      Anneika 2 years ago from VA.

      I have always wante to learn the Hebrew Aleph Bet, and I am so glad that I have found your hub I can now learn with my children so they can become my study partners. This is a great thank you. Hopefully we will be able to convert.

    • Writer Fox profile image
      Author

      Writer Fox 3 years ago from the wadi near the little river

      Here's how you write Emunah in Hebrew:

      אמונה

    • swilliams profile image

      Emunah La Paz 3 years ago from Arizona

      Do you speak Hebrew Fluently? I choose the name Emunah which means faith. It's such a meaningful language.

    • Writer Fox profile image
      Author

      Writer Fox 3 years ago from the wadi near the little river

      Hi SWilliams! Thanks so much for your feedback and your vote. Any language takes a lot of practice to learn. I know that Hebrew can be difficult for English speakers, but it does get easier the more you practice!

    • swilliams profile image

      Emunah La Paz 3 years ago from Arizona

      Very insightful! I took a course on the Hebrew alphabet, it's something that you need to practice daily if you want to get the hang of it. Voted up!

    • Writer Fox profile image
      Author

      Writer Fox 3 years ago from the wadi near the little river

      Thanks Martin!

    • Martin VK profile image

      Martin VK 3 years ago from Copenhagen, Denmark

      Awesome Hub!

    • Writer Fox profile image
      Author

      Writer Fox 3 years ago from the wadi near the little river

      Thank you, Earl. Chanukah Sameach!

    • Earl Noah Bernsby profile image

      Earl Noah Bernsby 3 years ago from Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

      Well done, sir! You don't know how long I've been looking for something like this!

    • Writer Fox profile image
      Author

      Writer Fox 4 years ago from the wadi near the little river

      Thank you and I hope you learned a little about the Hebrew alphabet.

    • DDE profile image

      Devika Primić 4 years ago from Dubrovnik, Croatia

      Informative and new to me and you shared this hub to the point.

    • Writer Fox profile image
      Author

      Writer Fox 4 years ago from the wadi near the little river

      Thank you so much, Audrey! I truly appreciate your support. This is the time of year many people are trying to learn a little Hebrew because the High Holidays begin next month.

    • brakel2 profile image

      Audrey Selig 4 years ago from Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

      Hi Writer Fox. You really did a lot of work on this hub.All your hubs are good,and I am glad you spoke up and it got published.. I am glad the other article on SEO is doing well in the SERPS. This hub might interest me in learning Hebrew. The tutorial looks easy to follow. I pinned it, tweeted it, and sent it to Facebook. Hope you get many visitors. Take care. Audrey

    • Writer Fox profile image
      Author

      Writer Fox 4 years ago from the wadi near the little river

      I truly appreciate your comment. Learning just a little Hebrew is the door to a new world and a life-time adventure. I hope you share the link to this webpage.

    • LaurieNunley517 profile image

      LaurieNunley517 4 years ago from Deep South

      I hope you win an award for this hub! This a comprehensive article and I will be on and off of it for awhile. I learned today that the Hebrew language has the power of creation in it and that the first words of Genesis spell G--s name . Do you believe He spoke the universe into existence using the Hebrew language? Thanks so much for this great resource!