ArtsAutosBooksBusinessEducationEntertainmentFamilyFashionFoodGamesGenderHealthHolidaysHomeHubPagesPersonal FinancePetsPoliticsReligionSportsTechnologyTravel

Judas Iscariot, Unsung Hero or the Treacherous Villain? -an Introspect

Updated on August 12, 2019
Joey Guillermo profile image

Entrepreneur, Life Coach, Enthusiast. In search for truth, prosperity, wisdom, serenity, a life living worth it’s while..

Sunday.. it’s traditional for most of us to do something spiritual. So, i’ve been looking for something to read or watch to broaden the spiritual aspects of my human self.. (I am not a preacher guys, ok? ;)


I stumbled upon Jesus and Judas, then i found myself following and browsing some researches, write ups and videos regarding Judas Iscariot. (Thank goodness, we have the internet :) Long story short, he became a villanous traitor by the near end in one of the most famous stories in history - after being one of the closest people to our master teacher, Jesus. (I’m a Christian, as you might have guessed; just an ordinary one :)

Judas’ story is seen as an unparalleled depth of betrayal, and regret turned suicide. His decisions made him one of the most hated character in history, maybe just a notch below the devil itself. But have u ever wondered, just for 30 pieces of silver, it’s not even gold, he turned-in one of the most benevolent person in the world? Have we asked ourselves what can we learn from this story? Or we just judged him rightaway saying he’s good for nothing?


There were several theories revolving and versions, even mentions of the gospel of Judas. I just kept my mind open and tried to be wiser than i usually am. Battling in my head, was Judas an unsung hero; or the anti-hero, just plain old bad gone worst? He sold out Jesus to the leaders of the Jewish priesthood which then turned him in to the Romans. But come to think of it, the resurrection couldn’t have come about without his treachery, doesn’t it?

Battling in my head, was Judas an unsung hero; or the anti-hero, just plain old bad gone worst?

As i revisited the story and browsed, i was faced with these - Being a close disciple and friend, was he possessed by the devil to do the deed? But Jesus could have excorsised him, right? Or, was it plain greediness that drove him mad, he was the treasurer of the pack by the ways. But you see, 30pcs of silver isn’t that much actually. He won’t get rich out of those.. Or was it a pact; that he has to do what was necessary to give way to the greater end - the resurrection and ascension? Take your pick, nevertheless, he became the most hated being in the world; an embodiment of treacherous betrayal at it’s best (or worst, if i may say).


You can do your own research because i tell you, there’s a lot, too many to mention here and get to the nitty-gritty details. My point in this article is more than just deciding on if he was ‘somehow the good guy’ or the bad, but futhermore, what can we learn from this story? Aren’t we sometimes a bit of a Judas ourselves? We make mistakes everyday of our lives, maybe not as bad as he had it; but do we learn from it? We maybe are making those mistakes and not learning anything; then continuously making basically the same mistakes in different degrees over and over? Or digging deeper, deeper learning and wisdom even from these mistakes? Or we just hang ourselves in regret?


Maybe it’s not a suicide physically, but emotionally; or maybe mentally or spiritually. We maybe ‘hanging ourselves‘ over those mistakes by quitting on broadening our wisdom - Wisdom that can be gained from mistakes and situations. We might be ‘hanging ourselves‘ by quitting to learn from our ‘not so good experiences’ that becomes eventually fears and doubts in ourselves, and other people. Keeping it up like that, maybe one day we might quit on life as well because our life-flames become smaller and smaller until the last spark fades; shrouded in all those fears and doubts. I hope you’re getting me here..

We might be ‘hanging ourselves’ by quitting to learn from our ‘not so good experiences’ that becomes eventually fears and doubts in ourselves, and other people.

The decision is ours to make on how to look at Judas’ story. And how we look at our own personal Judas.


Do we stop believing and learning, and hang ourselves failing to get what we might be missing out on? I’m just trying to make sense and somehow maybe awaken you, my friends, by making the Judas story as a template and learning from the greatest mistake in history. The choice is ours to make..

Comments

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment
    • Joey Guillermo profile imageAUTHOR

      Joey A Guillermo 

      6 days ago from Pasig City, Philippines

      Thanks sir jameel and tita paz for commenting ;) God bless all your works

    • Joey Guillermo profile imageAUTHOR

      Joey A Guillermo 

      7 days ago from Pasig City, Philippines

      Thanks Richard for sharing your take on the topic :) this issue is still being on debate for 2000 yrs, but i see you have your take and it’s an enlightening one.. thank you for sharing your thoughts

    • parrster profile image

      Richard Parr 

      7 days ago from Australia

      Judas is an interesting character. Like all of us, judas was a sinner (eg. scriptures tell us he was a thief). However his failing was that he didnt believe in Jesus. His action didnt condemn him because they were simply sin, but because they stemmed from a lack of faith (he didnt trust Jesus); and without faith it is impossible to please God. That's my thoughts. Thanks for sharing.

    • profile image

      Jameel Sule 

      7 days ago

      Nice Article!

    • profile image

      Paz 

      7 days ago

      Wow!!! Galing!

    working

    This website uses cookies

    As a user in the EEA, your approval is needed on a few things. To provide a better website experience, hubpages.com uses cookies (and other similar technologies) and may collect, process, and share personal data. Please choose which areas of our service you consent to our doing so.

    For more information on managing or withdrawing consents and how we handle data, visit our Privacy Policy at: https://hubpages.com/privacy-policy#gdpr

    Show Details
    Necessary
    HubPages Device IDThis is used to identify particular browsers or devices when the access the service, and is used for security reasons.
    LoginThis is necessary to sign in to the HubPages Service.
    Google RecaptchaThis is used to prevent bots and spam. (Privacy Policy)
    AkismetThis is used to detect comment spam. (Privacy Policy)
    HubPages Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide data on traffic to our website, all personally identifyable data is anonymized. (Privacy Policy)
    HubPages Traffic PixelThis is used to collect data on traffic to articles and other pages on our site. Unless you are signed in to a HubPages account, all personally identifiable information is anonymized.
    Amazon Web ServicesThis is a cloud services platform that we used to host our service. (Privacy Policy)
    CloudflareThis is a cloud CDN service that we use to efficiently deliver files required for our service to operate such as javascript, cascading style sheets, images, and videos. (Privacy Policy)
    Google Hosted LibrariesJavascript software libraries such as jQuery are loaded at endpoints on the googleapis.com or gstatic.com domains, for performance and efficiency reasons. (Privacy Policy)
    Features
    Google Custom SearchThis is feature allows you to search the site. (Privacy Policy)
    Google MapsSome articles have Google Maps embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    Google ChartsThis is used to display charts and graphs on articles and the author center. (Privacy Policy)
    Google AdSense Host APIThis service allows you to sign up for or associate a Google AdSense account with HubPages, so that you can earn money from ads on your articles. No data is shared unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    Google YouTubeSome articles have YouTube videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    VimeoSome articles have Vimeo videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    PaypalThis is used for a registered author who enrolls in the HubPages Earnings program and requests to be paid via PayPal. No data is shared with Paypal unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    Facebook LoginYou can use this to streamline signing up for, or signing in to your Hubpages account. No data is shared with Facebook unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    MavenThis supports the Maven widget and search functionality. (Privacy Policy)
    Marketing
    Google AdSenseThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Google DoubleClickGoogle provides ad serving technology and runs an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Index ExchangeThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    SovrnThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Facebook AdsThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Amazon Unified Ad MarketplaceThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    AppNexusThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    OpenxThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Rubicon ProjectThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    TripleLiftThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Say MediaWe partner with Say Media to deliver ad campaigns on our sites. (Privacy Policy)
    Remarketing PixelsWe may use remarketing pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to advertise the HubPages Service to people that have visited our sites.
    Conversion Tracking PixelsWe may use conversion tracking pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to identify when an advertisement has successfully resulted in the desired action, such as signing up for the HubPages Service or publishing an article on the HubPages Service.
    Statistics
    Author Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide traffic data and reports to the authors of articles on the HubPages Service. (Privacy Policy)
    ComscoreComScore is a media measurement and analytics company providing marketing data and analytics to enterprises, media and advertising agencies, and publishers. Non-consent will result in ComScore only processing obfuscated personal data. (Privacy Policy)
    Amazon Tracking PixelSome articles display amazon products as part of the Amazon Affiliate program, this pixel provides traffic statistics for those products (Privacy Policy)
    ClickscoThis is a data management platform studying reader behavior (Privacy Policy)