ArtsAutosBooksBusinessEducationEntertainmentFamilyFashionFoodGamesGenderHealthHolidaysHomeHubPagesPersonal FinancePetsPoliticsReligionSportsTechnologyTravel

Kitchen Witchin’: Wishbone Magic for Thanksgiving

Updated on August 25, 2016
WiccanSage profile image

Sage has been celebrating the Wheel of the Year for 25+ years, and being a holiday junkie, she just can't get enough of the sabbats!

Wishbone Magic

Thanksgiving is coming, and families will be gathering around big tables to break bread over a turkey dinner. When you join your family’s Thanksgiving dinner table this year, don’t forget to call the wishbone for yourself! The wishbone has a long, rich magical history—you can use it for your own magical purposes if you desire!

You find the wishbone by looking for where the neck cavity of the turkey. The ‘forked’ end of the wishbone straddles that cavity. If you peel away the meat, you’ll find the top tip of the wishbone and can pry it off the bird.

Once you dig out that little beauty of yours, consider doing one of these things with it.

Looking for more Thanksgiving 'kitchen witchery'? Check out Have a Magical Holiday: Kitchen Witchery for Thanksgiving!

Source

Traditional Wishbone Wish!

Make a Wish with magic!
Make a Wish with magic! | Source

Make a Wish

We all know the most popular use of the wishbone is to ‘make a wish’ between two people. Most people will do it right there at the dinner table, but it’s actually better if you let the bone dry for at least three days and become brittle before attempting it.

Have two people each take a hold of one side of the wishbone. Tell them to close their eyes and make their wishes. The most important factor is that they don’t tell the wish to anyone or it will not come true!!! When they’re ready, both parties can begin to tug and pull—if they both have patience, it can take a little while.

Once the bone breaks, the person holding the bigger half is the one who’s wish will come true. But guess what—if the bone splits up the center into equal pieces, or breaks into three pieces, both people’s wishes will come true!

Marriage Divination

In Victorian times, young ladies would use the wishbone similarly to the wishing process, only instead of trying to make a wish they would break it to see who would be the first to get married. In this case, the person holding the ­smaller piece is the one destined to be wed next.

Keep On Wishing

Source

Wish Amulet

You might not want to bust up that wishbone just yet—it’s actually got some staying power. The ancient Etruscans used to utilize the wishbones of birds for wish amulets around 700 – 900 BCE.

The process started by tossing a big circle of feed on the ground, and drawing letters or symbols around it. They would put a bird in the circle and take note of where it went to feed (sounds a little like a Ouija board, with a chicken as the planchette, doesn’t it?).

The ritual wasn’t done, though—after the chicken would tell them their fortune, it would be slaughtered and eaten. The wishbone would be reserved, and whenever the keeper of it had any desire he would wish for it while stroking the wishbone with his fingers.

Wishbone amulets of gold and silver were eventually forged for the same purpose—as a wish amulet. They were charmed and then worn or put in pouches and carried to bring good fortune. You can keep your wishbone for your own amulet—if you like, paint it with silver or gold paint. That will not only make it look pretty, will strengthen it so it wont’ get too brittle.

Incidentally, you can do this with a chicken, too—it doesn’t have to be a turkey.

Bring Fertility

If fertility is what you seek, you can do what early American women did with their turkey bones. Tack up a nail over the door, and put the wishbone on it. This tradition apparently came over with the Pilgrims from Europe, who probably got it from the Romans. This was not just used for women looking to conceive, but those looking to find someone to start a family with—so you might use it as an amulet to draw love.

Do you ever utilize the magic of the wishbone? Do you have any traditions not listed here? Please share!

Happy Thanksgiving!

Source

Comments

    0 of 8192 characters used
    Post Comment

    • WiccanSage profile imageAUTHOR

      Mackenzie Sage Wright 

      8 months ago

      Thank you Larry!

    • Larry Fish profile image

      Larry W Fish 

      8 months ago from Raleigh

      An interesting read, Mackenzie! I have made many wishes at the Thanksgiving table in my 70 years. I have never told anyone even one wish that I made. It is amazing down through history what the wishbone has meant. I have learned so much that I didn't know.

    • WiccanSage profile imageAUTHOR

      Mackenzie Sage Wright 

      4 years ago

      Thanks Sangre. I found it interesting when I started researching the history myself. It's amazing how long traditions or beliefs can hang on and continue, even when we've totally forgotten about why we do them or what they're for. I appreciate your comments, thanks for stopping by.

    • sangre profile image

      Sp Greaney 

      4 years ago from Ireland

      That's such an interesting fact to learn. I've never really knew the history behind it and the beliefs held by certain cultures relating to it. Amazing really. Great hub.

    • WiccanSage profile imageAUTHOR

      Mackenzie Sage Wright 

      4 years ago

      Wishing for more wishbones, I wonder if that's taboo like wishing for more wishes? Ah, well... there's always chicken dinners to look forward to in between Novembers. Thanks for stopping by, I appreciate your comments!

    • pocono foothills profile image

      John Fisher 

      4 years ago from Easton, Pennsylvania

      @WiccanSage-Interesting article. I never knew the part about if the wishbone breaks in the center or into 3 pieces. I don't know what happened to the wishbone this Thankgiving. All I know is that I didn't get it. Maybe last year, I should have wished that I would get the wishbone this year. Great Hub. Voted up!!!

    • WiccanSage profile imageAUTHOR

      Mackenzie Sage Wright 

      5 years ago

      Thanks Bishop; though Wicca came about 250 years too late and one ocean away to have any ties to Salem, MA (it originated in the UK in the 1940s). But I think learning about different religions and beliefs can be pretty interesting as well. I'm glad you enjoyed it, your comments are much appreciated.

    • Bishop55 profile image

      Rebecca 

      5 years ago from USA

      I don't really identify with Wicca/Wiccan's although my family is full of people native to Salem, MA, Indians, and tarot card readers. I'm much more "energy/spiritually" oriented, but I still find this stuff fun and interesting to read. :) Keep up the good hubs!

    • WiccanSage profile imageAUTHOR

      Mackenzie Sage Wright 

      5 years ago

      15, wow that's pretty cool. LOL. I'm glad you enjoyed it, thanks for your comments!

    • Bishop55 profile image

      Rebecca 

      5 years ago from USA

      interesting. The house I currently live in has a nail in the basement with about 15 wishbones on it. We cleaned the entire house, but I left those up. This was fun to read.

    • WiccanSage profile imageAUTHOR

      Mackenzie Sage Wright 

      5 years ago

      Thanks so much, MysticMoonlight, I wish you many more bigger halves. :-)

    • WiccanSage profile imageAUTHOR

      Mackenzie Sage Wright 

      5 years ago

      Thanks Nell Rose, much appreciated!

    • WiccanSage profile imageAUTHOR

      Mackenzie Sage Wright 

      5 years ago

      My kids still fight over it, lol. That and the drumsticks. You'd think they'd grow out of it by the teens & 20s.

    • profile image

      MysticMoonlight 

      5 years ago

      I've always had great luck with the wishbone! I've somehow always managed to get the larger half! :) As always, great article, Sage. I found the wish amulet especially interesting. Voted!

    • Nell Rose profile image

      Nell Rose 

      5 years ago from England

      I love the history of the wishbone, I never knew that it had been used to foresee who would get married first, and I love the idea of placing above the door too, voted up and shared! nell

    • CraftytotheCore profile image

      CraftytotheCore 

      5 years ago

      We always save the wishbone. It's part of our family tradition. It's a fun thing, especially for the kids. ;D

    • WiccanSage profile imageAUTHOR

      Mackenzie Sage Wright 

      5 years ago

      Thanks so much, Dreamhowl!

    • Dreamhowl profile image

      Jessica Marello 

      5 years ago from United States

      I love wishing on the wishbone at Thanksgiving. Thanks for sharing all of this history - voted up!

    working

    This website uses cookies

    As a user in the EEA, your approval is needed on a few things. To provide a better website experience, hubpages.com uses cookies (and other similar technologies) and may collect, process, and share personal data. Please choose which areas of our service you consent to our doing so.

    For more information on managing or withdrawing consents and how we handle data, visit our Privacy Policy at: https://hubpages.com/privacy-policy#gdpr

    Show Details
    Necessary
    HubPages Device IDThis is used to identify particular browsers or devices when the access the service, and is used for security reasons.
    LoginThis is necessary to sign in to the HubPages Service.
    Google RecaptchaThis is used to prevent bots and spam. (Privacy Policy)
    AkismetThis is used to detect comment spam. (Privacy Policy)
    HubPages Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide data on traffic to our website, all personally identifyable data is anonymized. (Privacy Policy)
    HubPages Traffic PixelThis is used to collect data on traffic to articles and other pages on our site. Unless you are signed in to a HubPages account, all personally identifiable information is anonymized.
    Amazon Web ServicesThis is a cloud services platform that we used to host our service. (Privacy Policy)
    CloudflareThis is a cloud CDN service that we use to efficiently deliver files required for our service to operate such as javascript, cascading style sheets, images, and videos. (Privacy Policy)
    Google Hosted LibrariesJavascript software libraries such as jQuery are loaded at endpoints on the googleapis.com or gstatic.com domains, for performance and efficiency reasons. (Privacy Policy)
    Features
    Google Custom SearchThis is feature allows you to search the site. (Privacy Policy)
    Google MapsSome articles have Google Maps embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    Google ChartsThis is used to display charts and graphs on articles and the author center. (Privacy Policy)
    Google AdSense Host APIThis service allows you to sign up for or associate a Google AdSense account with HubPages, so that you can earn money from ads on your articles. No data is shared unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    Google YouTubeSome articles have YouTube videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    VimeoSome articles have Vimeo videos embedded in them. (Privacy Policy)
    PaypalThis is used for a registered author who enrolls in the HubPages Earnings program and requests to be paid via PayPal. No data is shared with Paypal unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    Facebook LoginYou can use this to streamline signing up for, or signing in to your Hubpages account. No data is shared with Facebook unless you engage with this feature. (Privacy Policy)
    MavenThis supports the Maven widget and search functionality. (Privacy Policy)
    Marketing
    Google AdSenseThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Google DoubleClickGoogle provides ad serving technology and runs an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Index ExchangeThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    SovrnThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Facebook AdsThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Amazon Unified Ad MarketplaceThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    AppNexusThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    OpenxThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Rubicon ProjectThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    TripleLiftThis is an ad network. (Privacy Policy)
    Say MediaWe partner with Say Media to deliver ad campaigns on our sites. (Privacy Policy)
    Remarketing PixelsWe may use remarketing pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to advertise the HubPages Service to people that have visited our sites.
    Conversion Tracking PixelsWe may use conversion tracking pixels from advertising networks such as Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and Facebook in order to identify when an advertisement has successfully resulted in the desired action, such as signing up for the HubPages Service or publishing an article on the HubPages Service.
    Statistics
    Author Google AnalyticsThis is used to provide traffic data and reports to the authors of articles on the HubPages Service. (Privacy Policy)
    ComscoreComScore is a media measurement and analytics company providing marketing data and analytics to enterprises, media and advertising agencies, and publishers. Non-consent will result in ComScore only processing obfuscated personal data. (Privacy Policy)
    Amazon Tracking PixelSome articles display amazon products as part of the Amazon Affiliate program, this pixel provides traffic statistics for those products (Privacy Policy)